Enter to Win a Wireless Pen-Sized Oscilloscope!

IKALOGIC is giving away an IkaScope! (retail value $379)

The IkaScope WS200 is a pen-shaped battery-powered wireless oscilloscope that streams captured signals to almost any Wi-Fi-connected screen.

GO HERE TO ENTER TO WIN!

The IkaScope WS200 offers a 30M Hz bandwidth with its 200 Msamples/s sampling rate and maximum input of +/-40 Vpp. It provides galvanically-isolated measurements even when a USB connection is charging the internal battery. The IkaScope WS200 will work on desktop computers (Windows, Mac and Linux) as well as on mobile devices like tablets or smartphones. The free application software can be downloaded for whichever platform is needed.
The IkaScope WS200 has no power switch. It detects pressure on the probe tip and turns on automatically. Patented ProbeClick technology saves battery life: all power-consuming circuitry is only turned on when the probe tip is pressed, and the IkaScope WS200 automatically shuts down completely after a short period of non-use. The internal 450 mAh battery lasts about one week with daily regular use before recharging is necessary. An isolated USB connection allows for recharging the internal battery: two LEDs in the unit indicate battery charge and Wi-Fi status.

Clicking the Autoset button on the IkaScope software automatically adjusts gain and time-base to quickly view the signal optimally. The IkaScope WS200 also knows when to measure and when to hold the signal display without the need for a Run/Stop button. The IkaScope’s innovative Automatic History feature saves a capture of the signal when releasing pressure on the ProbeClick tip. The History Database is divided into Current Session and Favorites, where signal captures are permanently saved, even after the application is closed. Previously measured signals can quickly be recalled.

Most desktop oscilloscopes have a static reference grid with a fixed number of divisions, but the IkaScope allows pinch and zoom on touch screens (or zoom in/out with a mouse wheel), stretching the grid and allowing an operator to move and zoom through a signal capture for detailed review. The associated software even has a share button on the screen: simply click on it to share screenshot measurements.

IKALOGIC | www,ikalogic.com

 

Sensor Interface IC Enables Advanced Bio-Chemical Sensing

Analog Devices has announced today a new sensor interface IC that enables the next generation of intelligent electrochemical sensors. According to the company, it is the only solution available to incorporate potentiostat and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) functionality on a single chip. The ADuCM355 precision analog microcontroller with bio-sensor and chemical sensor interface is well suited for applications such as industrial gas sensing, instrumentation, vital signs monitoring and disease management.

The ADuCM355 is an ultra-low power precision analog microcontroller based on the ARM Cortex M3 processor especially designed to control and measure chemical and biosensors. It is the only solution available that supports dual potentiostat and >3 sensor electrodes.

Additional features:

  • Voltage, current and impedance measurement
  • Dual ultra-low power, low noise potentiostats: 8.5u A, 1.6 uV RMS
  • Flexible 16-bit, 400 ksps measurement channel
  • Advanced sensor diagnostics
  • Integrated analog hardware accelerators
  • 26 MHz core, 128 kB Flash, 64 kB SRAM

View the ADuCM355 product page, download data sheet, order samples and evaluation board.: www.analog.com/ADuCM355. Available now, the ADuCM355 is priced at $5.90 (1,000s).

Analog Devices | www.analog.com

Form vs. Function in Test

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

A couple months back I and the Circuit Cellar team attended ESC (Embedded Systems Conference) Boston. Having a booth was new for Circuit Cellar at ESC, so we were very pleased at the positive feedback from people who stopped by our booth—a mix of devoted long-time readers and new faces just learning about us. My thanks to those who became new subscribers on the spot. There are many good reasons for a technology editor like myself to attend tradeshows in our industry. Meeting with technology vendors—the people—face to face is the big one. I don’t care how convenient, realistic or powerful our various forms of electronic communication become. There will never—never ever—be any substitute for meetings done in person and the kind of conversation you can have face to face.

Another good reason to attend a show like ESC is to see the “stuff”—the embedded boards, chips, instruments and so on. I can write all day about the size, weight and power of a COM Express board. But it’s kinda nice to feel the size and weight by holding one in my hand. One type of gear that’s enormously important to see close up is test instrumentation products—oscilloscopes, logic analyzers, signal generators and so forth. Fortunately for me, ESC Boston had a nice cluster this year of test equipment exhibitors. Among these were Pico Technology, Rohde & Schwarz, Siglent Technologies, Tektronix and Teledyne LeCroy.

Like many of you, as an Electrical Engineering major in college I had a lot of EE labs. And I have to make a confession: Operating test equipment was never my strong suit. I remember my lab partners would seldom let me touch the oscilloscope once they caught on to my poor skills. I vividly remember a pair of them saying “Let’s have Jeff write the lab report. That’s at least something he’s good at.” Fast forward to my early years as a New Products Editor, and I sat through many press tour meetings. In those days, test equipment companies would make great efforts to lug their gear across country just to set it up and show me every last new feature of their new logic analyzer or scope.

At this year’s ESC Boston, it was fun seeing the state of the art test equipment on display. And I was able to glean a few insights. At today’s state of electronics technology, it’s quite feasible to have an all-in-one test system. But according to the vendors I talked to, there’s still a desire have a stand-alone box one can call an oscilloscope, for example. Also, even though touch-screen and push-button digital interfaces are mature technologies, many test customers still like feel of turning knobs when it comes to operating test gear.

Exemplifying what can be done with today’s technology, Pico Technology’s approach to test gear is to create compact, easily portable box-level systems. Instead of having a screen and arrays of controls, Pico Technology’s test systems instead interface with your laptop, so that laptop provides all the display and control needs for the equipment. Its latest example along those lines is its PicoScope 9300 Series of sampling oscilloscopes designed for measuring high-speed signals. The 9300 Series scopes provide 2 channels, 15 GHz bandwidth and 15 Terasample/s (64 fs) sequential sampling.

Rohde & Schwarz in contrast makes more traditional test gear, focusing on the high-performance end of the market. Its latest offering is its enhanced power-of-ten oscilloscope family with 10-bit resolution and large memory depth. According to the company, the power-of-ten oscilloscope families R&S RTB2000, R&S RTM3000 and R&S RTA4000 provide 10 times as much memory as comparable instruments and large 10.1” touchscreen displays.

Among the new products on display at Teledyne LeCroy’s booth at ESC Boston was what it claims as the industry’s first HDMI 2.1 Fixed Rate Link (FRL) Video Generator. FRL is the transport mode for HDMI 2.1 which enables transmission of uncompressed 8K video formats to reach link rates of up to 48 Gb/s.

All in all, my two days at ESC Boston were well spent. Aside from those test equipment vendors, there were a great mix of embedded hardware and embedded software tool vendors I met with at the show. I also sat in on a few presentations, including a great one called “ARM Trace: Kills Bugs Fast!” by IAR Systems’ Shawn Prestridge

This appears in the June (335) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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Digital Pressure Sensors Boost Design Flexibility

All Sensors has announced a new line of digital pressure sensors: the ELVR Series.  The new device series offers OEM customers increased design flexibility for pressure ranges from 2.5 to 75 mbar (1 to 30 inch H2O). The ELVR Series is a direct replacement to First Sensors’ HCLA product line.

Product highlights include an I2C or SPI interface, an analog 0.5 V to 4.5 V output signal, and significantly reduced position sensitivity. All Sensors’ CoBeam2 Technology allows for greater sensitivity while reducing package stress. The ELVR sensors can communicate directly with microcontrollers, eliminating the need for additional A/D converters. ELVR available at 3 V and 5 V supply voltage. the ELVR series is well suited for portable applications. A wide range of miniature SIP and DIP package options allows for flexible and space-saving PCB-mounting. Devices are available in bidirectional and unidirectional 2.5, 12.5, 25, 50 and 75 mbar pressure ranges.(inches of water)

Product Features

  • Miniature package with SIP, DIP and SMT lead configurations
  • PC board mountable package
  • Multiple port and lead configurations available

Electrical Features

  • Digital I2C , SPI interface and analog output
  • 12 Bit digital resolution and higher available upon request
  • Offered at 3 V and 5 V supply voltages. High Speed (cycle time 0.25 ms typical and response time 0.5 ms typical.)
  • All Sensors’ proprietary low pressure CoBeam2 Technology die

Custom pressure range and calibration outputs are available upon request. The device is well suited for applications including medical devices, pneumatic controls, instrumentation, environmental controls, HVAC and industrial controls. Samples are available for product testing.

All Sensors | www.allsensors.com 

Technology and Test Solutions for 5G

Next-Gen Communications

As carriers worldwide prepare for 5G communications, chip suppliers and test equipment vendors are evolving their products to meet the challenges of the 5G era.

By Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

The technologies that are enabling 5G communications are creating new challenges for embedded system developers. Faster mobile broadband data rates, massive amounts of machine-to-machine network interfacing and daunting low latency constraints all add to the complexity of 5G system design. Feeding those needs, chip vendors over the past 12 months have been releasing building blocks like modem chips and wideband mixers supporting 5G. And test equipment vendors are keeping pace with test gear designed to work with 5G technology.

With standards expected to reach finalization around 2020, 5G isn’t here yet, But efforts worldwide are laying the groundwork to deploy it. For its part, the Global mobile Suppliers Association (GSA) released a report in October 2017 entitled “Evolution from LTE to 5G.” According to the report, there is a frenzy of testing of 5G technology and concepts worldwide. The GSA has identified 103 operators in 49 countries that are investing in 5G technology in the form of demos, lab trials or field tests that are either under way or planned. Operators are sharing their intentions in terms of launch timetables for 5G, or prestandards 5G. The earliest launch dates currently planned are by operators in Italy and the US. Those early launches are necessarily limited in scope to either specific applications, or in limited geographic areas where they will function as extended commercial trials. Figure 1 shows the countries and the current planned dates for the earliest 5G launches in those countries.

FIGURE 1
Here is a map of pre-standards and standards-based 5G network plans announced. It shows the countries and current planned dates for the earliest 5G launches in those countries. (Source: Global mobile Suppliers Association (GSA)).

THE BIG PLAYERS

Intel and Qualcomm have been the big players to watch for 5G enabling technologies. In October 2017, Qualcomm Technologies, a subsidiary of Qualcomm, hit a significant milestone successfully achieving a 5G data connection on a 5G modem chipset for mobile devices. The Qualcomm Snapdragon X50 5G modem chipset achieved speeds and a data connection in the 28 GHz mmWave radio frequency band. The solution is expected to accelerate the delivery of 5G new radio (5G NR) enabled mobile devices to consumers. Along with the chip set demo Qualcomm Technologies previewed its first 5G smartphone reference design for the testing and optimization of 5G technology within the power and form-factor constraints of a smartphone.

The 5G data connection demonstration showed the chip set achieving Gigabit/s download speeds, using several 100 MHz 5G carriers and demonstrated a data connection in the 28 GHz millimeter wave (mmWave) spectrum. In addition to the Snapdragon X50 5G modem chipset, the demonstration also used the SDR051 mmWave RF transceiver IC. The demonstration made use of Keysight Technologies’ new 5G Protocol R&D Toolset and UXM 5G Wireless Test Platform. Qualcomm Technologies was the first company to announce a 5G modem chipset in 2016. The Snapdragon X50 5G NR modem family is expected to support commercial launches of 5G smartphones and networks in the first half of 2019. …

Read the full article in the January 330 issue of Circuit Cellar

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Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.