February Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The February issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. We’ve raised up a bumper crop of in-depth embedded electronics articles just for you, and packed ’em into our 84-page magazine.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of February 2019 Circuit Cellar:

MCUs ARE EVERYWHERE, DOING EVERYTHING

Electronics for Automotive Infotainment
As automotive dashboard displays get more sophisticated, information and entertainment are merging into so-called infotainment systems. That’s driving a need for powerful MCU- and MPU-based solutions that support the connectivity, computing and interfacing needs particular to these system designs. In this article, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at the technology and trends feuling automotive infotainment.

Inductive Sensing with PSoC MCUs
Inductive sensing is shaping up to be the next big thing for touch technology. It’s suited for applications involving metal-over-touch situations in automotive, industrial and other similar systems. In his article, Nishant Mittal explores the science and technology of inductive sensing. He then describes a complete system design, along with firmware, for an inductive sensing solution based on Cypress Semiconductor’s PSoC microcontroller.

Build a Self-Correcting LED Clock
In North America, most radio-controlled clocks use WWVB’s transmissions to set the correct time. WWVB is a Colorado-based time signal radio station near. Learn how Cornell graduates Eldar Slobodyan and Jason Ben Nathan designed and built a prototype of a Digital WWVB Clock. The project’s main components include a Microchip PIC32 MCU, an external oscillator and a display.

WE’VE GOT THE POWER

Product Focus: ADCs and DACs
Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and digital-to-analog converters (DACs) are two of the key IC components that enable digital systems to interact with the real world. Makers of analog ICs are constantly evolving their DAC and ADC chips pushing the barriers of resolution and speeds. This new Product Focus section updates readers on this technology and provides a product album of representative ADC and DAC products.

Building a Generator Control System
Three phase electrical power is a critical technology for heavy machinery. Learn how US Coast Guard Academy students Kent Altobelli and Caleb Stewart built a physical generator set model capable of producing three phase electricity. The article steps through the power sensors, master controller and DC-DC conversion design choices they faced with this project.

EMBEDDED COMPUTING FOR YOUR SYSTEM DESIGN

Non-Standard Single Board Computers
Although standard-form factor embedded computers provide a lot of value, many applications demand that form take priority over function. That’s where non-standard boards shine. The majority of non-standard boards tend to be extremely compact, and well suited for size-constrained system designs. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest technology trends and product developments in non-standard SBCs.

Thermal Management in machine learning
Artificial intelligence and machine learning continue to move toward center stage. But the powerful processing they require is tied to high power dissipation that results in a lot of heat to manage. In his article, Tom Gregory from 6SigmaET explores the alternatives available today with a special look at cooling Google’s Tensor Processor Unit 3.0 (TPUv3) which was designed with machine learning in mind.

… AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Bluetooth Mesh (Part 1)
Wireless mesh networks are being widely deployed in a wide variety of settings. In this article, Bob Japenga begins his series on Bluetooth mesh. He starts with defining what a mesh network is, then looks at two alternatives available to you as embedded systems designers.

Implementing Time Technology
Many embedded systems need to make use of synchronized time information. In this article, Jeff Bachiochi explores the history of time measurement and how it’s led to NTP and other modern technologies for coordinating universal date and time. Using Arduino and the Espressif System’s ESP32, Jeff then goes through the steps needed to enable your embedded system to request, retrieve and display the synchronized date and time to a display.

Infrared Sensors
Infrared sensing technology has broad application ranging from motion detection in security systems to proximity switches in consumer devices. In this article, George Novacek looks at the science, technology and circuitry of infrared sensors. He also discusses the various types of infrared sensing technologies and how to use them.

The Art of Voltage Probing
Using the right tool for the right job is a basic tenant of electronics engineering. In this article, Robert Lacoste explores one of the most common tools on an engineer’s bench: oscilloscope probes, and in particular the voltage measurement probe. He looks and the different types of voltage probes as well as the techniques to use them effectively and safely.

Pioneer Chooses Cypress Wi-Fi/ Bluetooth IC for Infotainment System

Cypress Semiconductor has announced that Pioneer has integrated Cypress’ Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Combo solution into its flagship in-dash navigation AV receiver. The solution enables passengers to display and use their smartphone’s apps on the receiver’s screen via Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, which provide the ability to use smartphone voice recognition to search for information or respond to text messages. The Cypress Wi-Fi and Bluetooth combo solution uses Real Simultaneous Dual Band (RSDB) technology so that Apple CarPlay and Android Auto can operate concurrently without degradation caused by switching back and forth between bands.
The Pioneer AVH-W8400NEX receiver uses Cypress’ CYW89359 combo solution, which includes an advanced coexistence engine that enables optimal performance for dual-band 2.4-GHz and 5-GHz 802.11ac Wi-Fi and dual-mode Bluetooth/Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) simultaneously for superior multimedia experiences. The CYW89359’s RSDB architecture enables two unique data streams to run at full throughput simultaneously by integrating two complete Wi-Fi subsystems into a single chip.

The CYW89359 is fully automotive qualified with AECQ-100 grade-3 validation and is being designed in by numerous top-tier car OEMs and automotive suppliers as a full in-vehicle connectivity solution, supporting infotainment and telematics applications such as smartphone screen-mirroring, content streaming and Bluetooth voice connectivity in car kits.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

Simplified Interfacing to High-Speed Infotainment In-Vehicle Networks

Microchip Technology recently announced a new high-speed network solution for in-vehicle infotainment with device control over Internet Protocol (IP). Unified Centralized Software Stack (UNICENS) is a free software module for anyone using Intelligent Network Interface Controllers (INIC), such as the OS81118, OS81119, and any future INICs. It enables you to focus on application development rather than network management.

Microchip UNICENS
With UNICENS, you can choose your preferred device control method including Media Oriented Systems Transport (MOST) technology’s FBlock, Ethernet IP and customer-specific methods. It also supports the configuration and control of all network participants from one central node. Furthermore, you don’t need microcontrollers in all the other nodes in the network. UNICENS is currently available as open-source software for Microchip customers.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

H.264 Video I/O Companion Integrated Circuits

Microchip Technology has announced the availability of the OS85621 and OS85623, which are the world’s first H.264 video I/O companion integrated circuits (ICs) optimized for the Media Oriented Systems Transport (MOST) high-speed automotive infotainment and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) network technology. Microchip OS85621

Featuring a low-latency, high-quality H.264 codec and an on-chip Digital Transmission Content Protection (DTCP) coprocessor, the OS85621 enables automotive designers to quickly implement content-protected video transmission solutions. You can now transmit video streams with restricted access from devices (e.g., DIDs, digital media drives, and TV tuners) as encrypted H.264 over a MOST network.

The OS85621’s on-chip DTCP coprocessor accelerates the computation-intensive operations required for DTCP authentication and content protection. You can simultaneously route up to eight independent data streams through the DTCP coprocessor’s cipher engine for M6 or AES-128 encryption/decryption.

The ultra-low-latency mode of the H.264 codec enables single-digit millisecond latency from video input to video output, including encoding, transmission over a MOST network, and decoding. This real-time, high-speed video processing makes the OS85623—which has no DTCP coprocessor—an excellent option for camera-based ADAS applications that are designed to enhance vehicle safety.

The OS85621 and OS85623 H.264 video I/O companion ICs are now available in a BGA 196 package. Volume pricing starts at $8.

Source: Microchip Technology