Laurent Haas Wins the CC Code Challenge (Week 11)

We have a winner of last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged the engineering community to find the mistake!

Congratulations to Laurent Haas of Paris, France for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 11! Laurent will receive CC T-shirt and The CC25 Anniversary Edition.

Laurent’s correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Laurent answered:

Line 6: reverse must be initialized to 0 => int reverse = 0;

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

Michael Welle Wins the CC Code Challenge (Week 10)

We have a winner of last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged the engineering community to find the mistake!

Congratulations to Michael Welle of Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 10! He’ll receive an IAR Kickstart: KSK-LPC4088-JL.

Michael’s correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Michael answered:

Line 15: strcmp returns 0 if both strings are equal. On the other hand 0 is interpreted as false in C, so the condition is wrong. if (strcmp(a,b)==0)

There were a few possible solutions to this error. Good job everyone who identified them!

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

Jon Chapman Wins the CC Code Challenge (Week 9)

We have a winner of last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged the engineering community to find the mistake!

Congratulations to Jon Chapman of Ohio, United States for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 9! He’ll receive a CCGold Archive on USB drive.

Jon’s correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Jon answered:

Line 24: bgcolor tag is misspelled as ‘bgoclor’. It needs to be corrected to ‘bgcolor’

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

CC Code Challenge (Week 8) Stumps Engineering Community

We stumped the engineering community with last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged you to find the mistake!

Since nobody had the correct answer, we’ve drawn one lucky winner at random from all those who participated.

Congratulations to Marcelo Jimenez of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for being selected in the CC Weekly Code Challenge – Week 7 drawing! He’ll receive a CC Tag Cloud t-shirt.

The language is Burroughs Corporation “Enhanced” Algol, a rather obscure language these days, though Algol variants were important in their time and are still discussed today in terms of their influence on the structure of subsequent programming languages. The correct answer was: Line 4: incorrect exponent character – it should be “2.99792458@8″

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

Alex Ivopol Wins the CC Code Challenge (Week 7)

We have a winner of last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged the engineering community to find the mistake!

Congratulations to Alex Ivopol of Wellington, New Zealand for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 7! He’ll receive an IAR Kickstart KSK-TMPM061-JL kit.

Alex’s correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Alex answered:

2013_code_challenge_07_answerYou can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

Colm Baston Wins the CC Code Challenge (Week 6)

We have a winner of last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged the engineering community to find the mistake!

Congratulations to Colm Baston of Flintshire, UK, for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 6! He’ll receive the Elektor 2012 & 2011 Archive DVD.

Colm’s correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Colm answered:

Line 7: (c == *s++) is comparing the values of c and *s rather than assigning: It should be (c = *s++)

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

Antonios Chorevas Wins the CC Code Challenge (Week 5)

We have a winner of last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged the engineering community to find the mistake!

Congratulations to Antonios Chorevas of Attiki, Greece, for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 5! He’ll receive a CC “Tag Cloud” T-shirt and a hardcopy of the CC25 Anniversary Issue.

Antonios’ correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Antonios answered:

Line 04: (x*x) must be replaced by ((x)*(x)) because there is problem with the priority of the operations

 

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

Heinz Nickisch Wins the CC Code Challenge (Week 4)

We have a winner of last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged the engineering community to find the mistake!

Congratulations to Heinz Nickisch of Bavaria, Germany, for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 4! He’ll receive an IAR Kickstart kit.

Heinz’s correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Heinz answered:

Line 37: BEGIN instead of BEING

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

Chu Tin Teng Wins the CC Code Challenge (Week 3)

We have a winner of last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged the engineering community to find mistake!

Congratulations to Chu Tin Teng of Fremont, CA, for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 3! He’ll receive a CC T-Shirt and one-year digital subscription/renewal to Circuit Cellar.

Chu’s correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Chu answered:

Line 7: string comparison should use cmp, instead of <=>. New line should read as “($aa cmp $ba) || ($an <=> $bn)”.

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

Chris Austen Wins the CC Code Challenge (Week 2)

It’s Wednesday, which means we’re announcing the winner of last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged the engineering community to find mistake!

Congratulations to Chris Austen of South Yorkshire, UK, for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 2! He’ll receive a CC Gold issue archive on a USB drive.

Chris’s correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Chris answered:

Line 5: ROT should be SWAP ROT for the given stack effect – though -ROT will work too.

The Code Challenge for Week 2

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

CC Weekly Code Challenge Winner

It’s Wednesday, which means we’re announcing the winner of the most recent CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems!

Congratulations to Peter Baston of Flintshire, UK, for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 1! He’ll receive an IAR Kickstart: KSK-LPC4088-JL.

Peter’s correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Peter answered Line 9: There should not be a “*” before argv[i].

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

 

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

CC25 Is Now Available

Ready to take a look at the past, present, and future of embedded technology, microcomputer programming, and electrical engineering? CC25 is now available.

Check out the issue preview.

We achieved three main goals by putting together this issue. One, we properly documented the history of Circuit Cellar from its launch in 1988 as a bi-monthly magazine
about microcomputer applications to the present day. Two, we gathered immediately applicable tips and tricks from professional engineers about designing, programming, and completing electronics projects. Three, we recorded the thoughts of innovative engineers, academics, and industry leaders on the future of embedded technologies ranging from
rapid prototyping platforms to 8-bit chips to FPGAs.

The issue’s content is gathered in three main sections. Each section comprises essays, project information, and interviews. In the Past section, we feature essays on the early days of Circuit Cellar, the thoughts of long-time readers about their first MCU-based projects, and more. For instance, Circuit Cellar‘s founder Steve Ciarcia writes about his early projects and the magazine’s launch in 1988. Long-time editor/contributor Dave Tweed documents some of his favorite projects from the past 25 years.

The Present section features advice from working hardware and software engineers. Examples include a review of embedded security risks and design tips for ensuring system reliability. We also include short interviews with professionals about their preferred microcontrollers, current projects, and engineering-related interests.

The Future section features essays by innovators such as Adafruit Industries founder Limor Fried, ARM engineer Simon Ford, and University of Utah professor John Regehr on topics such as the future of DIY engineering, rapid prototyping, and small-RAM devices. The section also features two different sets of interviews. In one, corporate leaders such as Microchip Technology CEO Steve Sanghi and IAR Systems CEO Stefan Skarin speculate on the future of embedded technology. In the other, engineers such as Stephen Edwards (Columbia University) offer their thoughts about the technologies that will shape our future.

As you read the issue, ask yourself the same questions we asked our contributors: What’s your take on the history of embedded technology? What can you design and program today? What do you think about the future of embedded technology? Let us know.

Electrostatic Cleaning Robot Project

How do you clean a clean-energy generating system? With a microcontroller (and a few other parts, of course). An excellent example is US designer Scott Potter’s award-winning, Renesas RL78 microcontroller-based Electrostatic Cleaning Robot system that cleans heliostats (i.e., solar-tracking mirrors) used in solar energy-harvesting systems. Renesas and Circuit Cellar magazine announced this week at DevCon 2012 in Garden Grove, CA, that Potter’s design won First Prize in the RL78 Green Energy Challenge.

This image depicts two Electrostatic Cleaning Robots set up on two heliostats. (Source: S. Potter)

The nearby image depicts two Electrostatic Cleaning Robots set up vertically in order to clean the two heliostats in a horizontal left-to-right (and vice versa) fashion.

The Electrostatic Cleaning Robot in place to clean

Potter’s design can quickly clean heliostats in Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants. The heliostats must be clean in order to maximize steam production, which generates power.

The robot cleaner prototype

Built around an RL78 microcontroller, the Electrostatic Cleaning Robot provides a reliable cleaning solution that’s powered entirely by photovoltaic cells. The robot traverses the surface of the mirror and uses a high-voltage AC electric field to sweep away dust and debris.

Parts and circuitry inside the robot cleaner

Object oriented C++ software, developed with the IAR Embedded Workbench and the RL78 Demonstration Kit, controls the device.

IAR Embedded Workbench IDE

The RL78 microcontroller uses the following for system control:

• 20 Digital I/Os used as system control lines

• 1 ADC monitors solar cell voltage

• 1 Interval timer provides controller time tick

• Timer array unit: 4 timers capture the width of sensor pulses

• Watchdog timer for system reliability

• Low voltage detection for reliable operation in intermittent solar conditions

• RTC used in diagnostic logs

• 1 UART used for diagnostics

• Flash memory for storing diagnostic logs

The complete project (description, schematics, diagrams, and code) is now available on the Challenge website.

 

CC 25th Anniversary Issue: The Past, Present, and Future of Embedded Design

In celebration of Circuit Cellar’s 25th year of publishing electrical engineering articles, we’ll release a special edition magazine around the start of 2013. The issue’s theme will be the past, present, and future of embedded electronics. World-renowned engineers, innovators, academics, and corporate leaders will provide essays, interviews, and projects on embedded design-related topics such as mixed-signal designs, the future of 8-bit chips, rapid prototyping, FPGAs, graphical user interfaces, embedded security, and much more.

Here are some of the essay topics that will appear in the issue:

  • The history of Circuit Cellar — Steve Ciarcia (Founder, Circuit Cellar, Engineer)
  • Do small-RAM devices have a future? — by John Regehr (Professor, University of Utah)
  • A review of embedded security risks — by Patrick Schaumont (Professor, Virginia Tech)
  • The DIY electronics revolution — by Limor Fried (Founder, Adafruit Industries)
  • The future of rapid prototyping — by Simon Ford (ARM mbed, Engineer)
  • Robust design — by George Novacek (Engineer, Retired Aerospace Executive)
  • Twenty-five essential embedded system design principles — by Bob Japenga (Embedded Systems Engineer, Co-Founder, Microtools Inc.)
  • Mixed-signal designs: the 25 errors you’ll make at least once — by Robert Lacoste (Founder, Alciom; Engineer)
  • User interface tips for embedded designers — by Curt Twillinger (Engineer)
  • Thinking in terms of hardware platforms, not chips — by Clemens Valens (Engineer, Elektor)
  • The future of FPGAs — by Colin O’Flynn (Engineer)
  • The future of e-learning for engineers and programmers — by Marty Hauff (e-Learning Specialist, Altium)
  • And more!

Interviews

We’ll feature interviews with embedded industry leaders and forward-thinking embedded design engineers and programmers such as:

More Content

In addition to the essays and interviews listed above, the issue will also include:

  • PROJECTS will be available via QR codes
  • INFOGRAPHICS depicting tech-related likes, dislikes, and ideas of hundreds of engineers.
  • And a few surprises!

Who Gets It?

All Circuit Cellar subscribers will receive the 25th Anniversary issue. Additionally, the magazine will be available online and promoted by Circuit Cellar’s parent company, Elektor International Media.

Get Involved

Want to get involved? Sponsorship and advertising opportunities are still available. Find out more by contacting Peter Wostrel at Strategic Media Marketing at 978-281-7708 (ext. 100) or peter@smmarketing.us. Inquire about editorial opportunities by contacting the editorial department.

About Circuit Cellar

Steve Ciarcia launched Circuit Cellar magazine in 1988. From its beginning as “Ciarcia’s Circuit Cellar,” a popular, long-running column in BYTE magazine, Ciarcia leveraged his engineering knowledge and passion for writing about it by launching his own publication. Since then, tens of thousands of readers around the world have come to regard Circuit Cellar as the #1 source for need-to-know information about embedded electronics, design, and programming.

DIY Green Energy Design Projects

Ready to start a low-power or energy-monitoring microcontroller-based design project? You’re in luck. We’re featuring eight award-winning, green energy-related designs that will help get your creative juices flowing.

The projects listed below placed at the top of Renesas’s RL78 Green Energy Challenge.

Electrostatic Cleaning Robot: Solar tracking mirrors, called heliostats, are an integral part of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants. They must be kept clean to help maximize the production of steam, which generates power. Using an RL78, the innovative Electrostatic Cleaning Robot provides a reliable cleaning solution that’s powered entirely by photovoltaic cells. The robot traverses the surface of the mirror and uses a high voltage AC electric field to sweep away dust and debris.

Parts and circuitry inside the robot cleaner

Cloud Electrofusion Machine: Using approximately 400 times less energy than commercial electrofusion machines, the Cloud Electrofusion Machine is designed for welding 0.5″ to 2″ polyethylene fittings. The RL78-controlled machine is designed to read a barcode on the fitting which determines fusion parameters and traceability. Along with the barcode data, the system logs GPS location to an SD card, if present, and transmits the data for each fusion to a cloud database for tracking purposes and quality control.

Inside the electrofusion machine (Source: M. Hamilton)

The Sun Chaser: A GPS Reference Station: The Sun Chaser is a well-designed, solar-based energy harvesting system that automatically recalculates the direction of a solar panel to ensure it is always facing the sun. Mounted on a rotating disc, the solar panel’s orientation is calculated using the registered GPS position. With an external compass, the internal accelerometer, a DC motor and stepper motor, you can determine the solar panel’s exact position. The system uses the Renesas RDKRL78G13 evaluation board running the Micrium µC/OS-III real-time kernel.

[Video: ]

Water Heater by Solar Concentration: This solar water heater is powered by the RL78 evaluation board and designed to deflect concentrated amounts of sunlight onto a water pipe for continual heating. The deflector, armed with a counterweight for easy tilting, automatically adjusts the angle of reflection for maximum solar energy using the lowest power consumption possible.

RL78-based solar water heater (Source: P. Berquin)

Air Quality Mapper: Want to make sure the air along your daily walking path is clean? The Air Quality Mapper is a portable device designed to track levels of CO2 and CO gasses for constructing “Smog Maps” to determine the healthiest routes. Constructed with an RDKRL78G13, the Mapper receives location data from its GPS module, takes readings of the CO2 and CO concentrations along a specific route and stores the data in an SD card. Using a PC, you can parse the SD card data, plot it, and upload it automatically to an online MySQL database that presents the data in a Google map.

Air quality mapper design (Source: R. Alvarez Torrico)

Wireless Remote Solar-Powered “Meteo Sensor”: You can easily measure meteorological parameters with the “Meteo Sensor.” The RL78 MCU-based design takes cyclical measurements of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, and supply voltage, and shares them using digital radio transceivers. Receivers are configured for listening of incoming data on the same radio channel. It simplifies the way weather data is gathered and eases construction of local measurement networks while being optimized for low energy usage and long battery life.

The design takes cyclical measurements of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, and supply voltage, and shares them using digital radio transceivers. (Source: G. Kaczmarek)

Portable Power Quality Meter: Monitoring electrical usage is becoming increasingly popular in modern homes. The Portable Power Quality Meter uses an RL78 MCU to read power factor, total harmonic distortion, line frequency, voltage, and electrical consumption information and stores the data for analysis.

The portable power quality meter uses an RL78 MCU to read power factor, total harmonic distortion, line frequency, voltage, and electrical consumption information and stores the data for analysis. (Source: A. Barbosa)

High-Altitude Low-Cost Experimental Glider (HALO): The “HALO” experimental glider project consists of three main parts. A weather balloon is the carrier section. A glider (the payload of the balloon) is the return section. A ground base section is used for communication and display telemetry data (not part of the contest project). Using the REFLEX flight simulator for testing, the glider has its own micro-GPS receiver, sensors and low-power MCU unit. It can take off, climb to pre-programmed altitude and return to a given coordinate.

High-altitude low-cost experimental glider (Source: J. Altenburg)