Slim Signage Player Features Radeon E8860 GPU and 6 HDMI Ports

By Eric Brown

Ibase’s new SI-626 digital signage and video wall (VW) player combines high-end functionality with a slim 30 mm height—1.5 mm thinner than its AMD Ryzen V1000 based SI-324 player. Like the SI-324, the SI-626 features hardware based EDID remote management with software setting mode to prevent display issues due to cable disconnection or display identification failures.


 
SI-626 from two angles
(click images to enlarge)
The system is notable for providing AMD’s Radeon E8860 graphics, which can drive six HDMI 1.4b displays. There’s also hardware EDID emulation for remote operation, as well as a “flexible VW display configuration setting.”

Like Ibase’s recent SI-614 and OPS-compatible IOPS-602
players, the SI-626 supports Intel’s 7th Gen “Kaby Lake” Core processors, and like the IOPS-602, it also supports 6th Gen Skylake parts. The system supports 7th and 6th Gen chips with FCBGA1440 sockets and Intel QM170 or HM170 chipsets by way of a “MBD626” mainboard.


SI-626 front view
(click image to enlarge)
The product page notes that the Core CPUs have 35 W TDPs or lower. Yet, the press release notes only one model: the quad-core 2.8 GHz/ 3.5 GHz Core i7-6820EQ from the Skylake family, which has a 45 W TDP. OS support is listed as “Win7 64-bit, Win10 64-bit Enterprise, and Linux Ubuntu 64-bit (Installation).”

The SI-626 can load up to 32GB of DDR4-2133 RAM and offers an M.2 M-Key 2280 slot for storage. There’s also a 2.5-inch SATA bay and an M.2 E-Key 2230 slot, as well as a full-size mini-PCIe slot for WiFi/BT, 4G LTE, and capture cards.

The SI-626 is equipped with 6x HDMI 1.4 ports with independent audio output and “ultra-high resolution” support. You also get 4x USB 3.0 ports, 2x RS-232 serial ports with RJ45 connectors, and dual GbE ports (Realtek RTL8111G). The system is further equipped with an audio jack, watchdog, mounting brackets, and 2x LEDs.

The 290 mm x 222 mm x 29.9 mm, 2.2 kg signage player provides a 0 to 45°C range with 5 grms, 5~500 Hz, random vibration resistance (with SSD). A segregated ventilation system is said to reduce internal dust.

The SI-626 offers a 12 V DC jack with a 150 W power adapter supported with Ibase iControl power management and Observer remote monitoring technologies. These work together to provide automatic power scheduling, power failure detection, and restoration to default state in the event of a system crash. You can even boot up the system “under low ambient conditions,” says Ibase.

Further information

The SI-626 appears to be available now at an undisclosed price with a standard configuration of 16 GB RAM and a 128 GB SSD. More information may be found at Ibase’s SI-626 product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on September 20..

Ibase | www.ibase.com.tw

COM Express Type 6 Card Sports 8th Gen Core or Xeon Chips

ADLINK has introduced its latest COM Express Type 6 modules. According to the company, Express-CF modules are equipped with the 8th generation Intel Core processor family and Intel Xeon processor E-2100M family, and are the first Type 6 modules to support both Xeon and Core i7 Hexa-core (6-core) CPUs. These Hexa-core processors support up to 12 threads and a turbo boost of up to 4.4 GHz. Compared to earlier mobile quad-core Xeon and Core i7 CPUs, the additional two cores of the new Hexa-core CPUs results in more than 25% performance boost at no significant cost increase.ADLINK’s Express-CF provides standard support for up to 48GB non-ECC DDR4 in three SO-DIMMs (two on the top side, one on the bottom), while complying with PICMG COM.0 mechanical specifications. Modules equipped with the Xeon Hexa-core processor support both ECC and non-ECC SODIMMs.

With integrated Intel UHD Graphics 630, the Express-CF supports up to three independent 4K displays via DisplayPort, HDMI, DVI and LVDS. ADLINK also offers either eDP or analog VGA as build options by customer request. Additionally, the Express-CF supports Intel Optane memory and NVMe SSDs through high speed PCIe x4 Gen3 interfaces.

ADLINK Technology | www.adlinktech.com

Form vs. Function in Test

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

A couple months back I and the Circuit Cellar team attended ESC (Embedded Systems Conference) Boston. Having a booth was new for Circuit Cellar at ESC, so we were very pleased at the positive feedback from people who stopped by our booth—a mix of devoted long-time readers and new faces just learning about us. My thanks to those who became new subscribers on the spot. There are many good reasons for a technology editor like myself to attend tradeshows in our industry. Meeting with technology vendors—the people—face to face is the big one. I don’t care how convenient, realistic or powerful our various forms of electronic communication become. There will never—never ever—be any substitute for meetings done in person and the kind of conversation you can have face to face.

Another good reason to attend a show like ESC is to see the “stuff”—the embedded boards, chips, instruments and so on. I can write all day about the size, weight and power of a COM Express board. But it’s kinda nice to feel the size and weight by holding one in my hand. One type of gear that’s enormously important to see close up is test instrumentation products—oscilloscopes, logic analyzers, signal generators and so forth. Fortunately for me, ESC Boston had a nice cluster this year of test equipment exhibitors. Among these were Pico Technology, Rohde & Schwarz, Siglent Technologies, Tektronix and Teledyne LeCroy.

Like many of you, as an Electrical Engineering major in college I had a lot of EE labs. And I have to make a confession: Operating test equipment was never my strong suit. I remember my lab partners would seldom let me touch the oscilloscope once they caught on to my poor skills. I vividly remember a pair of them saying “Let’s have Jeff write the lab report. That’s at least something he’s good at.” Fast forward to my early years as a New Products Editor, and I sat through many press tour meetings. In those days, test equipment companies would make great efforts to lug their gear across country just to set it up and show me every last new feature of their new logic analyzer or scope.

At this year’s ESC Boston, it was fun seeing the state of the art test equipment on display. And I was able to glean a few insights. At today’s state of electronics technology, it’s quite feasible to have an all-in-one test system. But according to the vendors I talked to, there’s still a desire have a stand-alone box one can call an oscilloscope, for example. Also, even though touch-screen and push-button digital interfaces are mature technologies, many test customers still like feel of turning knobs when it comes to operating test gear.

Exemplifying what can be done with today’s technology, Pico Technology’s approach to test gear is to create compact, easily portable box-level systems. Instead of having a screen and arrays of controls, Pico Technology’s test systems instead interface with your laptop, so that laptop provides all the display and control needs for the equipment. Its latest example along those lines is its PicoScope 9300 Series of sampling oscilloscopes designed for measuring high-speed signals. The 9300 Series scopes provide 2 channels, 15 GHz bandwidth and 15 Terasample/s (64 fs) sequential sampling.

Rohde & Schwarz in contrast makes more traditional test gear, focusing on the high-performance end of the market. Its latest offering is its enhanced power-of-ten oscilloscope family with 10-bit resolution and large memory depth. According to the company, the power-of-ten oscilloscope families R&S RTB2000, R&S RTM3000 and R&S RTA4000 provide 10 times as much memory as comparable instruments and large 10.1” touchscreen displays.

Among the new products on display at Teledyne LeCroy’s booth at ESC Boston was what it claims as the industry’s first HDMI 2.1 Fixed Rate Link (FRL) Video Generator. FRL is the transport mode for HDMI 2.1 which enables transmission of uncompressed 8K video formats to reach link rates of up to 48 Gb/s.

All in all, my two days at ESC Boston were well spent. Aside from those test equipment vendors, there were a great mix of embedded hardware and embedded software tool vendors I met with at the show. I also sat in on a few presentations, including a great one called “ARM Trace: Kills Bugs Fast!” by IAR Systems’ Shawn Prestridge

This appears in the June (335) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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Intel Coffee Lake H-Series Debut Processors Debut in Congatec and Seco Modules

By Eric Brown

Intel has rolled out new H-, M-, U- and T-series Intel Core and Xeon chips, expanding its line of 14 nm fabricated, 8th Gen Core Kaby Lake Refresh processors, code-named “Coffee Lake.” Of special interest are four new dual- and quad-core U-series chips with up to 2.7 GHz clock rates and 28 W TDPs, as well as four quad- and hexa-core H-series Core i5 and i7 processors and a pair of hexa-core M-series Xeon chips, all with 45 W TDP (total dissipated power).

Congatec Conga-TS370 (top) and Seco COMe-C08-BT6 (bottom) (click images to enlarge)

The hexa-core Core i7-8850H, quad-core Core i5-8400H, and hexa-core Xeon E-2176M are appearing in a pair of 125 mm x 95 mm COM Express Basic Type 6 announced by Congatec and Seco. Both the Conga-TS370 and Seco’s COMe-C08-BT6 are available with Linux or Windows 10, and support 0 to 60°C temperatures (see farther below).

Intel’s 8th Gen M- and H-series processors (click image to enlarge)

Intel launched its first round of 8th-Gen Kaby Lake Refresh “Coffee Lake” chips back in September. This fourth generation of its 14 nm fabricated Core chips — following Broadwell, Skylake, and Kaby Lake — offers relatively modest performance and power efficiency improvements.Like most of AMD’s new Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoCs, most of the Coffee Lake processors are double threaded, so four cores give you eight threads and six cores give you 12. The exception is a line of standard, desktop-oriented T-series chips with 35 W TDPs. The T-series models are all single-threaded except the top-of-the-line, hexa-core Core i7-8700T, clocked to 2.4 GHz /4.0 GHz.

Intel’s latest batch of U-series (top) and new T-series CPUs (bottom)
(click images to enlarge)

The latest batch of U-series processors give you more speed, but higher 28 W TDPs than the original batch. The initial U-series chips, which were used in recent Linux-based laptops from System76 and ZaReason, provide slightly faster quad- instead of dual-core designs with the same price and 15 W TDP as 7th-Gen “Kaby Lake” models. The first round of Coffee Lake chips also included some high-end models tuned to gaming, as well as the first hexa-core Core i5 and first quad-core Core i3 models.

Also today, Intel unveiled a new line of 300-series I/O chipsets that are based on the upcoming Cannon Lake PCH. The lineup includes a Q370 model that supports up to 6x USB 3.1 Gen2 ports, up to 24x PCIe 3.0 lanes, and Intel Wireless-AC for faster 802.11ac.

Intel’s original line of 8th Gen CPUs (top) and new 300-series I/O chipsets (bottom) (click images to enlarge)Intel added to the Coffee Lake parade with some gaming focused G-series chips that use a Radeon Vega GPU from rival AMD. The Core i7-8809G, which can be overclocked, as well as the fixed rate Core i7-8705G, are available in Intel NUC mini-PCs.Today’s media coverage emphasized Intel’s first mobile version of its gaming-oriented Core i9 design. The hexa-core Core i9-8950HK CPU uses thermal velocity boost” technology to jump from 2.9 GHz to 4.8 GHz.

The related H- and M-series processors used by Seco and Congatec include the Core i7-8850H, the fastest of the two hexa-core Core i7 models with 2. 6GHz /4.3 GHz performance. The i7-8850H offers a 9MB Intel Smart Cache and supports “partial” overclocking. The Core i5-8400H is the fastest of the two quad-core i5 models, with 2.5 GHz /4.2 GHz performance and an 8MB cache. The hexa-core, 2.7 GH z/4.4 GHz Xeon E-2176M with 12 MB cache is the slower of the two Xeon M-series chips. (The turbo speeds can only be achieved by one core at a time.)

All the models used by Congatec and Seco offer 45W TDPs and support Intel Optane memory and Intel VPro technology. As with other Coffee Lake processors, there are software patches to protect against Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. However, a hardware fix will await the 10nm Cannon Lake generation.

The three models used by the Conga-TS370 and COMe-C08-BT6 modules are the:

  • Intel Core i7-8850H (6x 12-thread 14nm Coffee Lake cores at 2.6 GHz /4.3 GHz); 9 MB Cache, 45W TDP (35W cTDP)
  • Intel Core i5-8400H 4x 8-thread 14 nm Coffee Lake cores at 2.5 GHz /4.2 GHz); 8 MB Cache, 45W TDP (35W cTDP)
  • Intel Xeon E-2176M, 8850H (6x 12-thread 14 nm Coffee Lake cores at 2.7 GHz /4.4 GHz); 9 MB Cache, 45 W TDP (35W cTDP)

Intel claims that the six-core H-series and M-series modules offer between 45 to 50 percent more multi-thread and 15 to 25 percent more single-thread performance compared to 7th Gen “Kaby Lake” Core processors. The built-in Intel Gen9 LP graphics can manage up to 3x independent displays at once, with a resolution up to 4096 x 2304 at 60 Hz, 24 bpp. There’s support for DirectX 12 and OpenGL 4.5, as well as an H.265 / HEVC hardware transcoder.

Conga-TS370

Like Congatec’s 6th Gen Skylake based Conga-TS170 and 7th Gen Kaby Lake powered Conga-TS175, the Conga-TS370 uses the COM Express Type 6 Basic form factor. All common Linux operating systems, as well as the 64-bit versions of Microsoft Windows 10 and Windows 10 IoT are supported.

 

Conga-TS370 block diagram
(click image to enlarge)

The module offers up to 10-year availability, and targets applications including “high performance embedded and mobile systems, industrial and medical workstations, storage servers and cloud workstations, as well as media transcoding and edge computing cores,” says Congatec.Thanks to the Coffee Lake-H chips, the module supports Intel Optane memory, as well as Intel Software Guard extensions, Trusted Execution Engine, and Intel Platform Trust Technology. The Core processors use the new Intel PCH-H QM370 Series I/O chipset while the Xeon is paired with a CM246 Series controller.

You can load up to 32GB of  DDR4-2666 memory via dual sockets with optional ECC. There are 4x SATA III interfaces, as well as an Intel i219-LM GbE controller with AMT 12.0 support. Expansion features include a PEG x16 Gen3 interface and 8x PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes.

The integrated Intel UHD630 graphics supports up to three independent 4K displays via HDMI 1.4a, eDP 1.4, and DisplayPort 1.2. Dual-channel LVDS is also available as an alternative to eDP, and for the first time, you can switch between eDP to LVDS by software alone, says Congatec.

The highlighted feature enabled by Coffee Lake-H is its support for up to 4x USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports, which operate at up to 10 Gbps. The module also includes 8x USB 2.0 interfaces.

The Conga-TS370 is further equipped with LPC, I2C, SMBus, GPIO, SDIO, and dual UARTs. There’s also an HD Audio interface, TPM 2.0, and ACPI 4.0 with battery support. The Congatec Board Controller provides features including watchdog, non-volatile user storage, and backlight control.

Support services are available, along with a range of accessories and standardized or customized carrier boards and systems. A Conga-Teva2 carrier is in the works but is not yet documented.

COMe-C08-BT6

Seco’s COMe-C08-BT6 module, which follows it similarly Type 6, 6th Gen Skylake based COMe-B09-BT6, is designed for applications including gaming, signage, infotainment, HMI, biomedical devices, Industry 4.0, automation, and telco. There’s support for 64-bit Linux and Windows 10.

 

COMe-C08-BT6
(click image to enlarge)

Not surprisingly, the feature set is very similar to that of the Conga-TS370. You get up to 3 2GB of DDR4-2666 with ECC, 4x SATA 3.0 channels, and an Intel i219-LM GbE controller.The COMe-C08-BT6 has the same triple display and 4K support as the Congatec model. In this case you get DP, HDMI, and DVI DDI interfaces, as well as a choice of eDP, LVDS, or LVDS + VGA interfaces. HD Audio is also available.

Like the Conga-TS370, there are 4x USB 3.1 Gen 2 interfaces, 8x USB 2.0 links, a PEG x16 Gen3 interface, and 8x PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes. Other features include 2x UARTs, as well as SPI, I2C, SMBus, LPC, and GPIO. You also get a watchdog, optional TPM 2.0, thermal and fan management signals, and 12 V or optional 5 V DC input.

CCOMe-965 carrier (top) and block diagram (bottom)
(click images to enlarge)The COMe-C08-BT6 is available with Seco’s CCOMe-965 Mini-ITX carrier board, which also supports other Seco Type 6 modules such as the COMe-B09-BT6 and Ryzen V1000 based COMe-B75-CT6. There’s also a Cross Platform Development Kit that includes the CCOMe-965, along with HDMI and DisplayPort cables, and is said to support ARM-based Type 6 COMs in addition to x86.

CCOMe-C30 carrier (top) and block diagram (bottom)
(click images to enlarge)One final development option is an upcoming, 3.5-inch form factor CCOMe-C30 board that features a DP++ port, 2x mini-DP++ ports, and LVDS and eDP connections. The 146 mm x 102 mm board has dual M.2 sockets, dual GbE ports, and SATA and microSD slots. You also get 2x USB 3.0 and 2x USB 2.0 ports, plus 4x serial headers, among other features.Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the Congatec Conga-TS370 or Seco COMe-C08-BT6 Type 6 modules. More on Congatec’s Conga-TS370 module may be found in the Conga-TS370 announcement and product pages.

More on Seco’s COMe-C08-BT6 may be found on the COMe-C08-BT6 product page.

Intel’s latest Intel Coffee Lake processors should start shipping in volume by the end of the month. More information may be found on Intel’s 8th Gen Intel Core announcement page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on April 3.

Congatec | www.congtatec.com

Seco | www.seco.com

Tiny i.MX8M Module Focuses on Streaming Media

By Eric Brown

Innocomm announced a 50 mm x 50 mm “WB10” module with an NXP i.MX8M Quad SoC, 8 GB eMMC, Wi-Fi-ac, BT 4.2, GbE, HDMI 2.0 with 4K HDR and audio I/O including SAI, SPDIF and DSD512.Among the many embedded products announced in recent weeks that run NXP’s 1.5 GHz, Cortex-A53-based i.MX8M SoC, Innocomm’s 50 mm x 500 mm WB10 is one of the smallest. The top prize goes to Variscite’s SODIMM-style, 55 mm x 30 mm DART-MX8M. Like Emcraft’s 80 mm x 60mm i.MX 8M SOM, the home entertainment focused WB10 supports only the quad-core i.MX8M instead of the dual-core model. Other i.MX8M modules include Compulab’s 68 mm x 42mm CL-SOM-iMX8.

WB10 (above) and NXP i.MX8M block diagram (below)
(click images to enlarge)
No OS support was listed, but all the other i.MX8M products we’ve seen have either run Linux or Linux and Android. The i.MX8M SoC incorporates a Vivante GC7000Lite GPU and VPU, enabling 4K HEVC/H265, H264, and VP9 video decoding with HDR. It also provides a 266MHz Cortex-M4 core for real-time tasks, as well as a security subsystem.

The WB10 module offers only 2 GB LPDDR4 instead of 4 GB for the other i.MX8M modules, and is also limited to 8GB eMMC. You do, however, get a GbE controller and onboard 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac with MIMO 2×2 and Bluetooth 4.2.

The WB10 is designed for Internet audio, home entertainment, and smart speaker applications, and offers more than the usual audio interfaces. Media I/O expressed via its three 80-pin connectors include HDMI 2.0a with 4K and HDR support, as well as MIPI-DSI, 2x MIPI-CSI, SPDIF Rx/Tx, 4x SAI and the high-end DSD512 audio interface.

WB10 block diagram (above) and WB10 mounted on optional carrier board (below)
(click images to enlarge)

You also get USB 3.0 host, USB 2.0 device, 2x I2C, 3x UART and single GPIO, PWM, SPI, and PCIe interfaces. No power or temperature range details were provided. The WB10 is also available with an optional, unnamed carrier board that is only slightly larger than the module itself. No more details were available. Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the WB10. More information may be found on Innocomm’s WB10 product page.

Innocomm | www.innocomm.com

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on March 6.

Commell Launches its First ARM-Based Pico-ITX

By Eric Brown

Commell has announced the LP-150, a Rockchip RK3128 based Pico-ITX SBC that appears to be its first ARM-based embedded board of any kind. The 100 mm x 72 mm LP-150 is the only ARM-based SBC out of the many dozens of mostly Intel-based boards listed on Commell’s SBC page.

Shipping with Android 4.4.4, but also supporting Linux, the LP-150 is intended primarily for imaging, machine vision and digital signage applications. Other Commell Pico-ITX SBCs include its Intel Braswell based LP-176.

Commell LP-150

Rockchip’s quad-core, Cortex-A7 RK3128 hasn’t seen as much uptake in the embedded world as the quad -A17 RK3288, which is found on hacker boards such as the Firefly-RK3288 Reload or the high-end, hexa-core RK3399, which has appeared on numerous recent products such as OpenEmbed’s em3399 module or Aaeon’s RICO-3399 PICO-ITX SBC. The only RK3128-based SBC we can recall is the open spec Firefly-FirePrime S.

The LP-150 SBC has a fairly modest feature set, with only 512 MB DDR3. Yet, it offers a few features you don’t typically find on x86 Pico-ITX SBCs like eMMC storage (8GB) and built-in Wi-Fi. Media features include an HDMI 1.4 port limited to HD resolution and an LVDS interface with capacitive touchscreen support. You also get CVBS inputs and outputs and audio I/O headers.

The LP-150 is further equipped with a GbE port and USB 2.0 host and OTG ports. There is also an RTC with battery, and a smattering of RS-232, UART, and GPIO interfaces.

Specifications listed for the Commell LP-150 include:

  • Processor — Rockchip RK3128 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.3 GHz); Mali-400 MP2 GPU with OpenGL ES1.1 and 2.0, OpenVG1.1
  • Memory — 512 MB DDR3
  • Storage — 8 GB eMMC; microSD slot
  • Display:
    • HDMI 1.4 port for up to 1080p
    • Single-channel 18/24-bit LVDS for up to 1280 x 720 displays or up to 1024 x 600 cap. touchscreens
    • LCD/LVDS panel and inverter connectors
    • CVBS in/out
  • Wireless — Wi-Fi with SMA antenna
  • Networking — Gigabit Ethernet port (RTL8211E)
  • Other I/O:
    • USB 2.0 host port with support for 4-port hub
    • USB 2.0 OTG port
    • 2x RS232 interfaces
    • 3x UART
    • Audio line-out, mic-in headers (Rockchip codec)
    • GPIO header
  • Other features — Power, recovery, reset buttons; RTC with lithium battery; LED
  • Operating temperature — 0 to 70°C
  • Power — DC input 5 V
  • Dimensions — 100 mm x 72 mm (Pico-ITX)
  • Operating system — Android 4.4.4; Linux also supported

Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the LP-150. More information may be found on Commell’s LP-150 product page.

Commell |  www.commell.com.tw

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on March 6.

Rugged COM Express Module Sports AMD V1000

MEN Micro has announced the CB71C, a rugged COM Express module for rail, public transportation and industry applications like data acquisition, infotainment, transcoding and live 3D. It is 100% compatible with COM Express Type 6 pin-out and conforms to the VITA 59 standard, which specifies robust mechanics to ensure reliable operation even under the harshest environmental conditions.

The CB71C is based on AMD’s V1000 APU family. It is equipped with a Radeon Vega next-generation 3D graphics engine with up to 11 compute units, and supports up to 4 displays with a resolution of up to 4k without the need for additional graphics hardware. With up to four high-performance processor cores, the CB71C is also suitable for virtualization. Based on the Rugged COM Express standard, the CB71C is embedded in a closed aluminum frame, which ensures optimum EMC protection and efficient conduction cooling supporting a temperature range of -40°C to +85°C. To withstand serious shock and vibration, only soldered components are used.

The CB71C can be equipped with a wide range of long-term available processors with scalable performance, all supporting ECC. Passive cooling is possible with low-power versions. The CB71C can also be equipped with up to 32 GB of directly soldered DDR4 main memory and a 16 GB eMMC. Available high-speed interfaces include PCI Express 3.0 links, DDI (DP, eDP, HDMI), SATA 3.0, Gbit Ethernet and USB 3.0.

The board features an advanced board management controller with monitoring functions for safety-relevant applications. In addition, the CB71C has a Trusted Platform Module and supports hardware memory encryption, providing protection against both physical and inter-VM storage attacks. This is essential for security-critical applications such as payment and ticketing terminals, fleet management or monitoring.

MEN Micro | www.menmicro.com

HDMI TFT Modules Simplify Connectivity

HDMI TFT module product line that greatly simplifies the process of connecting to the display. Rather than juggling an FPC ribbon cable with a middle-man controller board, you can connect an HDMI cable from your desired board or computer right into the TFT module. This makes it easy to interface with your display from the development and prototyping stages, all the way into final application production.

The ease-of-use of these new products follows through into touch panel integration as well. For both the resistive and capacitive (PCAP) touch panel options, USB-HID driver recognition is installed. Each of the touch panel modules are also each pre-calibrated in-house to the display they’re mounted on. This means that a simple USB to micro-USB cable just needs to be connected from your board with touch interaction output (such as Raspberry Pi) to the module and your touch interactivity is ready to go immediately.

3.5″ SBC Serves up Skylake Processors

COMMELL has announced its LS-37K 3.5-inch embedded mini-board based on Intel 6th/7th generation FCLGA1151 Skylake / Kaby Lake Core processor family and Xeon E3-1200 v5 processor. The Skylake PC is claimed to deliver 30 percent better performance than a PC base on Ivy Bridge architecture, 20 percent better performance than a PC based on Haswell, and 10 percent better performance than a Broadwell PC.

LS-37K-3D8The LS-37K desktop 3.5-inch mini-board platform supports DDR4 memory DIMM 1866/2133 MHz up to 16 GB. The platform is based on Intel HD530 (Skylake) HD630, (Kaby Lake) and HD P530 (Xeon E3-1200v5). For graphics, the Skylake GPU offers 24 execution units (EUs) clocked at up to 1150Mhz (depending on the CPU model). The revised video engine now decodes H.265/HEVC completely in hardware and thereby much more efficiently than before, and HD Graphics 630 GPU is largely identical to the 530 found in Skylake, The only real upgrade here is the HEVC and VP9 support. LS-37K Displays can be connected via 1 VGA, 1 LVDS, 1 DVI, 1 HDMI and one DP port, up to three displays can be controlled simultaneously.

LS-37K offers lots of features including high-speed data transfer interfaces such as 4 x USB3.0 and 2 x SATAIII, equipped with dual Gigabit Ethernet (One of the dual LAN with iAMT 11.0 supported), and comes with PS/2 port, 5 x RS232 and 1 x RS232/422/485, 4 x USB2.0, Intel® High Definition Audio, and 1 Mini PCIe socket (supporting mSATA) and 9 to 30 VDC input.

COMMELL | www.commell.com

Fanless Small Form Factor PC System

HABEYThe BIS-3922 improves on HABEY’s BIS-6922 system by offering additional I/O for more applications and solutions. The system is well suited for automation, digital signage, network security, point of sale, transportation, and digital surveillance applications.
The BIS-3922 system includes six DB9 COM ports on the front panel, one of which supports RS-232/-422/-485. HABEY’s proprietary ICEFIN design ensures maximum heat dissipation and a true fanless system.

The BIS-3922 system is built with the Intel QM77 chipset and is compatible with the third-generation Ivy Bridge Core processors. The BIS-3922 system’s additional features include a HM77 chipset that supports third-generation Intel Core i3/i5/i7 processors; dual gigabit Ethernet ports; High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI), video graphics array (VGA), and low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS) display interfaces; one mini-PCI Express (PCIe) and one mSATA expansion; and a 3.5” single-board computer (SBC) form factor.

Contact HABEY for pricing.

HABEY USA, Inc.
www.habeyusa.com