Gigabit Ethernet Designs

WurthWurth Electronics Midcom and Lantiq recently announced The Evaluation Kit, a jointly developed demonstration kit. The kit enables users to easily add Ethernet hardware to an application or device and provides all necessary information to understand the demands of an Ethernet hardware design.

The Evaluation Kit includes an easy-to-use 1-Gbps demonstration board. The (54-mm × 92-mm) credit card-sized demonstration board is powered by USB. The board plugs into PCs and provides up to 1-Gbps bidirectional data rates.

The Evaluation Kit costs approximately $175.

Wurth Electronics Midcom, Inc.
www.we-online.com

Lantiq
www.lantiq.com

Client Profile: Integrated Knowledge Systems

Integrated Knowledge Systems' NavRanger board

Integrated Knowledge Systems’ NavRanger board

Phoenix, AZ

CONTACT: James Donald, james@iknowsystems.com
www.iknowsystems.com

EMBEDDED PRODUCTS: Integrated Knowledge Systems provides hardware and software solutions for autonomous systems.
featured Product: The NavRanger-OEM is a single-board high-speed laser ranging system with a nine-axis inertial measurement unit for robotic and scanning applications. The system provides 20,000 distance samples per second with a 1-cm resolution and a range of more than 30 m in sunlight when using optics. The NavRanger also includes sufficient serial, analog, and digital I/O for stand-alone robotic or scanning applications.

The NavRanger uses USB, CAN, RS-232, analog, or wireless interfaces for operation with a host computer. Integrated Knowledge Systems can work with you to provide software, optics, and scanning mechanisms to fit your application. Example software and reference designs are available on the company’s website.

EXCLUSIVE OFFER: Enter the code CIRCUIT2014 in the “Special Instructions to Seller” box at checkout and Integrated Knowledge Systems will take $20 off your first order.


 

Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

Client Profile: ImageCraft Creations, Inc.

CorStarter prototyping board

CorStarter prototyping board

2625 Middlefield Road, #685,
Palo Alto, CA 94306

CONTACT: Richard Man,
richard@imagecraft.com
imagecraft.com

EMBEDDED PRODUCTS:ImageCraft Version 8 C compilers with an IDE for Atmel AVR and Cortex M devices are full-featured toolsets backed by strong support.

CorStarter-STM32 is a complete C hardware and software kit for STM32 Cortex-M3 devices. The $99 kit includes a JTAG pod for programming and debugging.

ImageCraft products offer excellent features and support within budget requisitions. ImageCraft compiler toolsets are used by professionals who demand excellent code quality, full features, and diligent support in a timely manner.

The small, fast compilers provide helpful informational messages and include an IDE with an application builder (Atmel AVR) and debugger (Cortex-M), whole-program code compression technology, and MISRA safety checks. ImageCraft offers two editions that cost $249 and $499.

The demo is fully functional for 45 days, so it is easy to test it yourself.

EXCLUSIVE OFFER: For a limited time, ImageCraft is offering Circuit Cellar readers $40 off the Standard and PRO versions of its Atmel AVR and Cortex-M compiler toolsets. To take advantage of this offer, please visit http://imagecraft.com/xyzzy.html.


 

Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

Innovation Space: A Workspace for Prototyping, Programming, and Writing

RobotBASIC co-developer John Blankenship accomplishes a lot in his “cluttered” Vero Beach, FL-based workspace.

JohnBlankenship

John Blankenship in his workspace, where he develops, designs, and writes.

He develops software, designs hardware, packages robot parts for sale, and write books and magazine articles. Thus, his workspace isn’t always neat and tidy, he explained.

“The walls are covered with shelves filled with numerous books, a wide variety of parts, miscellaneous tools, several pieces of test equipment, and many robot prototypes,” he noted.

“Most people would probably find my space cluttered and confining, but for me it comforting knowing everything I might need is close at hand.”

Blankenship co-developed RobotBASIC with Samuel Mishal, a friend and talented programmer. The introductory programming language is geared toward high school-level students.

This PCB makes it easy to build a RobotBASIC-compatible robot.

This PCB makes it easy to build a RobotBASIC-compatible robot.

You can read Blankenship’s article, “Using a Simulated Robot to Decrease Development Time,” in the March 2014 edition of Circuit Cellar. He details how implementing a robotic simulation can reduce development time. Here’s an excerpt:

If you have ever built a robot, you know the physical construction and electronic aspects are only the first step. The real work begins when you start programming your creation.

A typical starting point is to develop a library of subroutines that implement basic behaviors. Later, the routines can be combined to create more complex behaviors and eventually full-blown applications. For example, navigational skills (e.g., hugging a wall, following a line, or finding a beacon) can serve as basic building blocks for tasks such as mowing a yard, finding a charging station, or delivering drinks to guests at a party. Developing basic behaviors can be difficult though, especially if they must work for a variety of situations. For instance, a behavior that enables a robot to transverse a hallway to find a specified doorway and pass through it should work properly with different-width hallways and doorways. Furthermore, the robot should at least attempt to autonomously contend with problems arising from the imprecise movements associated with most hobby robots.

Such problems can generally be solved with a closed-loop control system that continually modifies the robot’s movements based on sensor readings. Unfortunately, sensor readings in a real-world environment are often just as flawed as the robot’s movements. For example, tray reflections from ultrasonic or infrared sensors can produce erroneous sensor readings. Even when the sensors are reading correctly, faulty data can be obtained due to unexpected environmental conditions. These types of problems are generally random and are therefore difficult to detect and identify because the offending situations cannot easily be duplicated. A robot simulator can be a valuable tool in such situations.

Do you want to share images of your workspace, hackspace, or “circuit cellar”? Send your images and space info to editor@circuitcellar.com.

Q&A: Scott Garman, Technical Evangelist

Scott Garman is more than just a Linux software engineer. He is also heavily involved with the Yocto Project, an open-source collaboration that provides tools for the embedded Linux industry. In 2013, Scott helped Intel launch the MinnowBoard, the company’s first open-hardware SBC. —Nan Price, Associate Editor

Scott Garman

Scott Garman

NAN: Describe your current position at Intel. What types of projects have you developed?

SCOTT: I’ve worked at Intel’s Open Source Technology Center for just about four years. I began as an embedded Linux software engineer working on the Yocto Project and within the last year, I moved into a technical evangelism role representing Intel’s involvement with the MinnowBoard.

Before working at Intel, my background was in developing audio products based on embedded Linux for both consumer and industrial markets. I also started my career as a Linux system administrator in academic computing for a particle physics group.

Scott was involved with an Intel MinnowBoard robotics and computer vision demo, which took place at LinuxCon Japan in May 2013.

Scott was involved with an Intel MinnowBoard robotics and computer vision demo, which took place at LinuxCon Japan in May 2013.

I’m definitely a generalist when it comes to working with Linux. I tend to bounce around between things that don’t always get the attention they need, whether it is security, developer training, or community outreach.

More specifically, I’ve developed and maintained parallel computing clusters, created sound-level management systems used at concert stadiums, worked on multi-room home audio media servers and touchscreen control systems, dug into the dark areas of the Autotools and embedded Linux build systems, and developed fun conference demos involving robotics and computer vision. I feel very fortunate to be involved with embedded Linux at this point in history—these are very exciting times!

Scott is shown working on an Intel MinnowBoard demo, which was built around an OWI Robotic Arm.

Scott is shown working on an Intel MinnowBoard demo, which was built around an OWI Robotic Arm.

NAN: Can you tell us a little more about your involvement with the Yocto Project (www.yoctoproject.org)?

SCOTT: The Yocto Project is an effort to reduce the amount of fragmentation in the embedded Linux industry. It is centered on the OpenEmbedded build system, which offers a tremendous amount of flexibility in how you can create embedded Linux distros. It gives you the ability to customize nearly every policy of your embedded Linux system, such as which compiler optimizations you want or which binary package format you need to use. Its killer feature is a layer-based architecture that makes it easy to reuse your code to develop embedded applications that can run on multiple hardware platforms by just swapping out the board support package (BSP) layer and issuing a rebuild command.

New releases of the build system come out twice a year, in April and October.

Here, the OWI Robotic Arm is being assembled.

Here, the OWI Robotic Arm is being assembled.

I’ve maintained various user space recipes (i.e., software components) within OpenEmbedded (e.g., sudo, openssh, etc.). I’ve also made various improvements to our emulation environment, which enables you to run QEMU and test your Linux images without having to install it on hardware.

I created the first version of a security tracking system to monitor Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) reports that are relevant to recipes we maintain. I also developed training materials for new developers getting started with the Yocto Project, including a very popular introductory screencast “Getting Started with the Yocto Project—New Developer Screencast Tutorial

NAN: Intel recently introduced the MinnowBoard SBC. Describe the board’s components and uses.

SCOTT: The MinnowBoard is based on Intel’s Queens Bay platform, which pairs a Tunnel Creek Atom CPU (the E640 running at 1 GHz) with the Topcliff Platform controller hub. The board has 1 GB of RAM and includes PCI Express, which powers our SATA disk support and gigabit Ethernet. It’s an SBC that’s well suited for embedded applications that can use that extra CPU and especially I/O performance.

Scott doesn’t have a dedicated workbench or garage. He says he tends to just clear off his desk, lay down some cardboard, and work on things such as the Trippy RGB Waves Kit, which is shown.

Scott doesn’t have a dedicated workbench or garage. He says he tends to just clear off his desk, lay down some cardboard, and work on things such as the Trippy RGB Waves Kit, which is shown.

The MinnowBoard also has the embedded bus standards you’d expect, including GPIO, I2C, SPI, and even CAN (used in automotive applications) support. We have an expansion connector on the board where we route these buses, as well as two lanes of PCI Express for custom high-speed I/O expansion.

There are countless things you can do with MinnowBoard, but I’ve found it is especially well suited for projects where you want to combine embedded hardware with computing applications that benefit from higher performance (e.g., robots that use computer vision, as a central hub for home automation projects, networked video streaming appliances, etc.).

And of course it’s open hardware, which means the schematics, Gerber files, and other design files are available under a Creative Commons license. This makes it attractive for companies that want to customize the board for a commercial product; educational environments, where students can learn how boards like this are designed; or for those who want an open environment to interface their hardware projects.

I created a MinnowBoard embedded Linux board demo involving an OWI Robotic Arm. You can watch a YouTube video to see how it works.

NAN: What compelled Intel to make the MinnowBoard open hardware?

SCOTT: The main motivation for the MinnowBoard was to create an affordable Atom-based development platform for the Yocto Project. We also felt it was a great opportunity to try to release the board’s design as open hardware. It was exciting to be part of this, because the MinnowBoard is the first Atom-based embedded board to be released as open hardware and reach the market in volume.

Open hardware enables our customers to take the design and build on it in ways we couldn’t anticipate. It’s a concept that is gaining traction within Intel, as can be seen with the announcement of Intel’s open-hardware Galileo project.

NAN: What types of personal projects are you working on?

SCOTT: I’ve recently gone on an electronics kit-building binge. Just getting some practice again with my soldering iron with a well-paced project is a meditative and restorative activity for me.

Scott’s Blinky POV Kit is shown. “I don’t know what I’d do without my PanaVise Jr. [vise] and some alligator clips,” he said.

Scott’s Blinky POV Kit is shown. “I don’t know what I’d do without my PanaVise Jr. [vise] and some alligator clips,” he said.

I worked on one project, the Trippy RGB Waves Kit, which includes an RGB LED and is controlled by a microcontroller. It also has an IR sensor that is intended to detect when you wave your hand over it. This can be used to trigger some behavior of the RGB LED (e.g., cycling the colors). Another project, the Blinky POV Kit, is a row of LEDs that can be programmed to create simple text or logos when you wave the device around, using image persistence.

Below is a completed JeeNode v6 Kit Scott built one weekend.

Below is a completed JeeNode v6 Kit Scott built one weekend.

My current project is to add some wireless sensors around my home, including temperature sensors and a homebrew security system to monitor when doors get opened using 915-MHz JeeNodes. The JeeNode is a microcontroller paired with a low-power RF transceiver, which is useful for home-automation projects and sensor networks. Of course the central server for collating and reporting sensor data will be a MinnowBoard.

NAN: Tell us about your involvement in the Portland, OR, open-source developer community.

SCOTT: Portland has an amazing community of open-source developers. There is an especially strong community of web application developers, but more people are hacking on hardware nowadays, too. It’s a very social community and we have multiple nights per week where you can show up at a bar and hack on things with people.

This photo was taken in the Open Source Bridge hacker lounge, where people socialize and collaborate on projects. Here someone brought a brainwave-control game. The players are wearing electroencephalography (EEG) readers, which are strapped to their heads. The goal of the game is to use biofeedback to move the floating ball to your opponent’s side of the board.

This photo was taken in the Open Source Bridge hacker lounge, where people socialize and collaborate on projects. Here someone brought a brainwave-control game. The players are wearing electroencephalography (EEG) readers, which are strapped to their heads. The goal of the game is to use biofeedback to move the floating ball to your opponent’s side of the board.

I’d say it’s a novelty if I wasn’t so used to it already—walking into a bar or coffee shop and joining a cluster of friendly people, all with their laptops open. We have coworking spaces, such as Collective Agency, and hackerspaces, such as BrainSilo and Flux (a hackerspace focused on creating a welcoming space for women).

Take a look at Calagator to catch a glimpse of all the open-source and entrepreneurial activity going on in Portland. There are often multiple events going on every night of the week. Calagator itself is a Ruby on Rails application that was frequently developed at the bar gatherings I referred to earlier. We also have technical conferences ranging from the professional OSCON to the more grassroots and intimate Open Source Bridge.

I would unequivocally state that moving to Portland was one of the best things I did for developing a career working with open-source technologies, and in my case, on open-source projects.