3D Gesture Recognition Controller for Cars

Microchip Technology has announced a new 3D gesture recognition controller that offers the lowest system cost in the automotive industry, providing a durable single-chip solution for advanced automotive HMI designs. The MGC3140 joins Microchip’s family of easy-to-use 3D gesture controllers as the first qualified for automotive use.

Suited for a range for applications that limit driver distraction and add convenience to vehicles, Microchip’s new capacitive technology-based air gesture controller is ideal for navigating infotainment systems, sun shade operation, interior lighting and other applications. The technology also supports the opening of foot-activated rear liftgates and any other features a manufacturer wishes to incorporate with a simple gesture action.
The MGC3140 is Automotive Electronics Council AEC-Q100 qualified with an operating temperature range of -40°C to +125°C, and it meets the strict electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements of automotive system designs. Each 3D gesture system consists of a sensor that can be constructed from any conductive material, as well as the Microchip gesture controller tuned for each individual application.

Car manufacturers are increasingly seeking ways to reduce driver distraction through implementing functional safety technology in vehicles. Many Human Machine Interface (HMI) designers are turning to gesture recognition as a solution to improve driver and vehicle safety without sacrificing interior design, adding features that allow drivers to easily control everything from switching on lights to answering phone calls while focusing on the road.

While existing solutions such as infrared and time-of-flight technologies can be costly and operate poorly in bright or direct sunlight, the MGC3140 offers reliable sensing in full sunlight and harsh environments. Other solutions on the market also come with physical constraints and require significant infrastructure and space to be integrated in a vehicle. The MGC3140 is compatible with ergonomic interior designs and enables HMI designers to innovate with fewer physical constraints, as the sensor can be any conductive material and hidden from view.

The Emerald evaluation kit provides a convenient evaluation platform for the 3D gesture recognition controller. The kit includes a reference PCB with the MGC3140 controller, a PCB-based sensor to recognize gestures, as well as all needed cables, software and documentation to support an easy-to-use user experience. All parts are compatible with Microchip’s Aurea software development environment which supports all Microchip 3D gesture controllers.

The MGC3140 is available now in sampling and volume production quantities.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

Gesture Recognition in a Boxing Glove

Sensors Packed in the Punch

Learn how these two Boston University graduate students built a gesture-detection wearable that acts as a building block for a larger fitness telemetry system. Using a Linux-based Gumstix Verdex, the wearable couples an inertial measurement unit with a pressure sensor embedded in a boxing glove.

By Blade Olson and Patrick Dillon

Diagnostic monitoring of physical activity is growing in demand for physical therapists, entertainment technologists, sports trainers and for postoperative monitoring with surgeons [1][2]. In response to the need for a low-cost, low-profile, versatile, extensible, wearable activity sensor, the Hit-Rec boxing sensor is a proof-of-concept device that demonstrates on-board gesture recognition and high-throughput data monitoring are possible on a wearable sensor that can withstand violent impacts. The Hit-Rec’s ability to gather raw sensor values and run calculations at a high frame rate make the Hit-Rec an ideal diagnostic device for physical therapists searching for slight perturbations across a user’s gestures in a single recording session or for looking at discrepancies between the ideal motions of a healthy individual and the user’s current motions. The following sections will describe the implementation of a prototype for the Hit-Rec using a boxing glove (See Lead Photo Above).

SYSTEM OVERVIEW

The Hit-Rec sensor incorporates a Gumstix Verdex Pro running Linux, a 9-DoF (degree of freedom) inertial measurement unit (IMU), a pressure sensor that is connected to the Gumstix via a 12-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and LEDs for user feedback. The ADC and IMU both communicate over I2C. The LEDs communicate to the Gumstix through general purpose input/output (GPIO). Figure 1 shows a high-level explanation of hardware interfaces and Figure 2 provides an illustration of the system overview. All software was written in C and runs exclusively on the Gumstix Verdex Pro. A Linux kernel module was written to interact with the LEDs from the user-space program that performs data capture and analysis. IMU data was smoothed and corrected in real-time with an open-source attitude and heading reference system (AHRS) provided by Mahony [3][4]. A circular buffer queue was used to store and retrieve sensor data for recording and analysis. Punch classification compares accelerometer values at each data point and chooses the gesture with smallest discrepancy.

Figure 1
This high-level diagram details the data transfer connections made between the main hardware and software components of the Hit-Rec.

Figure 2
Overview of the software architecture for translating IMU and Pressure data to user feedback

Each of three LEDs on the Hit-Rec glove represents a different gesture type. After the “punchomatic” program is started, the user is prompted to record three gestures by way of three flashing LEDs. In the background, IMU data is continuously being recorded. The first, yellow LED flashes until an impact is registered, at which point the last 50 frames of IMU data are used as the “fingerprint“ for the gesture. This gesture fingerprint is stored for the rest of the session. Two additional gestures are recorded in an identical manner using the red and blue LEDs for the subsequent punches. After three gestures have been recorded, the user can punch in any form and the Hit-Rec will classify the new punch according to the three recently recorded punch gestures. Feedback on the most closely related punch is presented by lighting up the corresponding LED of the originally recorded gesture when a new punch occurs.

SENSORS

We used the Adafruit LSM9DS0 with breakout board as an IMU sensor and a force-sensitive resistor (FSR) from Adafruit as a pressure sensor. Both sensors communicate over I2C, which the pressure sensor achieves through an ADC. …

Read the full article in the June 335 issue of Circuit Cellar

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Next-Gen Optical Sensors Enhance UV Protection & Gesture Recognition

Silicon Labs’s new optical sensors are intended to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enable you to develop touchless user interfaces. The Si1133 optical sensor provides a cost-effective solution for adding highly accurate UV index measurement capabilities to a variety of products (e.g., sports equipment).SiliconLabs Si1153

The Si1133 sensor enables you to accurately measure UV index levels and monitor UV exposure. You can implement it in a variety of outdoor recreation products (e.g.,  fitness wearables).

The Si1133’s specs and features:

  • ±1.5 on the UV scale
  • Ambient light sensing supporting less than 100 mlx resolution and operation under dark glass
  • Highly integrated solution reducing cost and complexity with on-chip dual 23-bit
  • ADCs, DSP, and high-sensitivity visible light, UV, and IR photodiodes
  • I2C serial communications with up to 3.4 Mbps data rate
  • 500-nA standby current
  • Small 2 mm × 2 mm QFN package

The Si1153 ambient light sensor is optimized for operation in bright daylight. You can use it for gesture control and proximity detection applications. The new sensor can be used outdoors over an extended range of up to 2 m, which makes ideal for the gesture-based operation of automotive infotainment systems, bicycle computers, and more.

The Si1153’s specs and features:

  • Proximity detection adjustable from 1 to 200 cm
  • Up to three LED drivers for motion detection
  • Ambient light sensing supporting less than 100 mlx resolution and operation under dark glass
  • On-chip dual 23-bit ADCs, DSP, and high-sensitivity visible light and IR photodiodes
  • I2C serial communications with up to 3.4 Mbps data rate
  • 500-nA standby current
  • 2 mm × 2 mm QFN or 2.9 mm × 4.9 mm module with LED

Samples and production quantities of the Si1133-AA00-GM UV index sensor are available for $1.13 in 10,000-unit quantities. Samples and production quantities of the Si1153 proximity/gesture detection sensor are also available. The extended-range Si1153-AA00-GM costs $1.84in 10,000-unit quantities. The Si1153-AA09-GM with enhanced daylight performance costs $1.91 in 10,000-unit quantities. The Si1153-AA9X-GM module with integrated IR LED costs $2.32 in 10,000-unit quantities. The 115XOPT-EXP-EVB evaluation kit is available for $44.43.

Source: Silicon Labs

GestIC Controller Enables One-step Design-in of 3-D Gesture Recognition

Microchip Technology recently announced a new addition to its patented GestIC family. The new MGC3030 3-D gesture controller features simplified user-interface options focused on gesture detection, enabling true one-step design-in of 3-D gesture recognition in consumer and embedded devices. Housed in an easy-to-manufacture SSOP28 package, the MGC3030 expands the use of 3-D gesture control features to high-volume, cost-sensitive applications such as audio, lighting, and toys.GestIC

The simplicity of gesture-detection integration offered by the MGC3030 is also achieved through Microchip’s free, downloadable AUREA graphical user interface (GUI) and easily configurable general-purpose IO ports that even allow for host MCU/processor-free usage. The MGC3030’s on-chip 32-bit digital signal processor executes real-time gesture processing, which eliminates the need for external cameras or controllers for host processing and allows for faster and more natural user interaction with devices.

The MGC3030 makes full use of the GestIC family development tools, such as Microchip’s Colibri Gesture Suite, which is an on-chip software library of gesture features. Intuitive and natural movements of the human hand are recognized, making the operation of a device functional, intuitive, and fun. Without the need to touch the device, features such as Flick Gestures, the Air Wheel, or the proximity detection perform commands such as changing audio tracks, adjusting volume control or backlighting, and many others. All gestures are processed on-chip, allowing manufacturers to realize powerful user interfaces with very low development effort.

Unique to GestIC technology, the programmable Auto Wake-Up On Approach feature begins operating in the range of 100-µW power consumption, enabling always-on gesture sensing in power-constrained applications. If real user interaction is detected, the system automatically switches into full sensing mode and alternates back to auto wake-up mode once the user leaves the sensing area. These combined features and capabilities provide designers with the ability to quickly integrate gesture detection features at price points that are ideal for high-volume devices.

Also available is Microchip’s Woodstar MGC3030 Development Kit (DM160226). The $139 kit is available via any Microchip sales representative, authorized worldwide distributor, or microchipDIRECT (www.microchip.com/Dev-Kit-012015a). The kit comes with the AUREA GUI, the central tool to parameterize the MGC3030 and the Colibri Suite to suit the needs of any design. AUREA is available via a free download at www.microchip.com/AUREA-GUI-012015a. The Colibri Gesture Suite is an extensive library of proven and natural 3-D gestures for hands and fingers that is preprogrammed into the MGC3030.

The MGC3030 featuring GestIC technology is available in a 28-pin SSOP package. Each unit costs under $2 each in high volumes.

Source: Microchip Technology