Modular DIN Rail Box PC Targets Transportation Systems

MEN Micro has announced the MC50M, a modular DIN rail box PC for embedded applications in transportation. The computer platform is based on Intel’s Atom E3900 CPU series. This makes the MC50M the ideal basis for functions such as security gateway, predictive maintenance, CCTV, ticketing systems or as a diagnostic server.

The MC50M can be used as a stand-alone product or in combination with a range of pre-fabricated extension modules, providing additional features and short delivery times. Extension modules can provide application-specific functions such as wireless communication (LTE advanced, WLAN, GNSS), MVB, CAN bus or other I/Os. A removable storage shuttle supports the integration of one to two 2.5″ SATA hard disks/SSDs. The wide range PSU allows isolated power supply from 24 V DC to 110 V DC nominal and extends the entire system to EN 50155 compliance.

The board management controller provides increased reliability and reduces downtime. The Trusted Platform Module supports security and encryption features. With the ignition switch for remote startup and shutdown control, the platform provides additional energy saving features. The aluminum housing with cooling fins ensures conductive cooling and fanless operation. The MC50M has no moving parts, so it can be operated maintenance-free.

The long-term availability of 15 years from product launch minimizes life cycle management by making the MC50M available for at least this period. MEN’s DIN rail concept is designed for flexible configuration of module combinations and is suitable for embedded IoT applications in various markets. The CPU modules can be flexibly combined with various expansion modules and power supplies.

In the modular system, the data transfer between the individual modules as well as the power supply of the components is implemented via the expansion connectors standardized by MEN.The concept specifications include housing dimensions, mounting, cooling and IP protection. In addition, the expansion connectors and their pin assignment are defined. DIN rail mounting (35 mm) is standard. Wall and 19” rack mounting is possible using adaption brackets.

MEN Micro | www.menmicro.com

Building Automation LON-IP Standard Earns ANSI/CTA Approval

The Consumer Technology Association(CTA) and LonMark International have announced that the ANSI/CTA-709.7 LON IP is now approved as a new American National Standard (ANS) by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The new standard focuses on the interoperability of Internet of Things (IoT) devices and provides a complete model for implementing LON IP device-to-device and device-to-application communication interoperability.
This new standard will provide multiple parties – including users, developers, vendors, integrators and specifiers of open building control systems – a mechanism to develop and deliver a higher level of interoperability using native Ethernet/IP based devices. The new standard describes the complete set of requirements for vendors to develop LON devices with native IP communications, which offers higher speed and better IT integration flexibility. As more building control networks require more data and more IoT application interfaces, this new media type for LON control networks provides all of the benefits and functionality to meet this growing demand.

The ANSI/CTA-709.7 Implementation Guidelines define the application layer requirements for interoperable devices to communicate directly on Ethernet. It defines the addressing requirements for both IPv4 and IPv6. LonMark will offer full interoperability testing of any device utilizing the new channel type. The standard defines all of the timing parameters, configuration, and interface requirements to the full 709.1 protocol stack.

A few years prior the ANSI/CTA-709.6 Application Elements built upon the ANSI/CTA-709.5 Implementation Guidelines by providing a catalog of more than 100 common device profiles, with more than 380 specific implementation options. These profiles define the mandatory and optional design requirements for standard data variables, standard configuration properties, enumeration types and standard interface file requirements. This extensive library of device profiles includes definitions for a broad collection of devices for HVAC, indoor and outdoor (roadway) lighting, security, access, metering, energy management, fire and smoke control, gateways, commercial and industrial I/O, gas detection, generators, room automation, renewable energy, utility, automated food service, semiconductor fabrication, transportation, home appliances and others.

LonMark International | www.lonmark.org

 

Category 11 LTE Supported on Full Mini PCIe Card

Telit has announced the LM940, a global Full PCI Express Mini Card (mPCIe) module for supporting LTE Advanced Category 11 (Cat 11) with speeds of up to 600 Mbps, available with various mobile network operator approvals in the fourth quarter of 2017. According to Telit it is the only enabling technology in an mPCIe form factor to support Cat 11 with the Snapdragon X12 LTE modem. The card gives system designers additional bandwidth and near instant network response times to serve applications like high definition video streaming for digital signage. The Snapdragon X12 LTE modem with LTE Advanced Telit urltechnologies provides peak download speeds of 600 Mbps.

The LM940 iallows OEMs to immediately leverage the 3x carrier aggregation and the higher order modulation of the 256 QAM capabilities currently available amongst most mobile operator networks. Combined with an exceptional power efficiency platform, the card is well suited to enable commercial and enterprise applications in the router industry, such as branch office connectivity, LTE failover, digital signage, kiosks, pop-up stores, vehicle routers, construction sites and more.

Telit | www.telit.com

Places for the IoT Inside Your Home

It’s estimated that by the year 2020, more than 30 billion devices worldwide will be wirelessly connected to the IoT. While the IoT has massive implications for government and industry, individual electronics DIYers have long recognized how projects that enable wireless communication between everyday devices can solve or avert big problems for homeowners.

February CoverOur February issue focusing on Wireless Communications features two such projects, including  Raul Alvarez Torrico’s Home Energy Gateway, which enables users to remotely monitor energy consumption and control household devices (e.g., lights and appliances).

A Digilent chipKIT Max32-based embedded gateway/web server communicates with a single smart power meter and several smart plugs in a home area wireless network. ”The user sees a web interface containing the controls to turn on/off the smart plugs and sees the monitored power consumption data that comes from the smart meter in real time,” Torrico says.

While energy use is one common priority for homeowners, another is protecting property from hidden dangers such as undetected water leaks. Devlin Gualtieri wanted a water alarm system that could integrate several wireless units signaling a single receiver. But he didn’t want to buy one designed to work with expensive home alarm systems charging monthly fees.

In this issue, Gualtieri writes about his wireless water alarm network, which has simple hardware including a Microchip Technology PIC12F675 microcontroller and water conductance sensors (i.e., interdigital electrodes) made out of copper wire wrapped around perforated board.

It’s an inexpensive and efficient approach that can be expanded. “Multiple interdigital sensors can be wired in parallel at a single alarm,” Gualtieri says. A single alarm unit can monitor multiple water sources (e.g., a hot water tank, a clothes washer, and a home heating system boiler).

Also in this issue, columnist George Novacek begins a series on wireless data links. His first article addresses the basic principles of radio communications that can be used in control systems.

Other issue highlights include advice on extending flash memory life; using C language in FPGA design; detecting capacitor dielectric absorption; a Georgia Tech researcher’s essay on the future of inkjet-printed circuitry; and an overview of the hackerspaces and enterprising designs represented at the World Maker Faire in New York.

Editor’s Note: Circuit Cellar‘s February issue will be available online in mid-to-late January for download by members or single-issue purchase by web shop visitors.