June Issue: Vehicle Tracking, Bit Banging, and More

Circuit Cellar’s June issue is now online, outlining DIY projects ranging from an automated real-time vehicle locator to a  GPS-oriented solar tracker and offering solid advice on bit banging, FPGA reconfiguration, customizing the Linux kernel, and more.

June issueA persistent problem typically sparks the invention of projects featured in our magazine. For example, when the campus at Penn State Erie, The Behrend College, had a growth spurt, the local transit authority provided a shuttle bus to help students who were rushing from class to class. But ridership was low because of the bus’ unpredictable schedule.

So a college engineering team constructed a mobile application to track the bus. That system inspired the cover of our June issue and complements its communications theme.

The three-part system consists of a user’s smartphone running a HTML5-compatible browser, a base station consisting of an XTend 900-MHz radio connected to a Raspberry Pi single-board computer, and a mobile tracker including a GPS receiver, a Microchip Technology PIC18F26K22 microcontroller, and an XTend module.

The Raspberry Pi runs a web server to handle requests from a user’s smartphone. The user then receives accurate bus arrival times.

Also aligning with June’s theme, we present an article about implementing serial data transmission through bit banging. You’ll gain a better understanding of how serial data is transmitted and received by a microprocessor’s hardware UART peripheral. You’ll also learn how bit banging can achieve serial communication in software, which is essential when your embedded system’s microprocessor lacks a built-in UART.

Recognizing a rapidly unfolding communications trend, this issue includes an inventor’s essay about how the presence of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) in the latest mobile devices is sparking a big boom in innovative hardware/sensor add-ons that use your smartphone or tablet as an interface. Other communications-related articles include Part 2 of a close look at radio-frequency identification (RFID). This month’s installment describes the front-end analog circuitry for the RFID base station of a secure door-entry project.

In addition, we offer articles about adjusting your FPGA design while it’s operating, modifying the Linux kernel to suit your hardware and software designs, tools and techniques to boost your power supply, digital data encoding in wireless systems, GPS orientation of a solar panel, and an interview with Quinn Dunki, an embedded applications consultant and hacker.

The June issue is available for membership download or single-issue purchase.

A Serene Workspace for Board Evaluation and Writing

 Elecronics engineer, entrepreneur, and author Jack Ganssle recently sent us information about his Finksburg, MD, workspace:

I’m in a very rural area and I value the quietness and the view out of the window over my desk. However, there are more farmers than engineers here so there’s not much of a high-tech community! I work out of the house and share an office with my wife, who handles all of my travel and administrative matters. My corner is both lab space and desk. Some of the equipment changes fairly rapidly as vendors send in gear for reviews and evaluation.

ganssle-workspace

Ganssle’s desk is home to ever-changing equipment. His Agilent Technologies MSO-X-3054A mixed-signal oscilloscope is a mainstay.

The centerpiece, though, is my Agilent Technologies MSO-X-3054A mixed-signal oscilloscope. It’s 500 MHz, 4 GSps, and includes four analog channels and 16 digital channels, as well as a waveform generator and protocol analyzer. I capture a lot of oscilloscope traces for articles and talks, and the USB interface sure makes that easy. That’s pretty common on oscilloscopes, now, but being an old-timer I remember struggling with a Polaroid scope camera.

The oscilloscope’s waveform generator has somewhat slow (20-ns) rise time when making pulses, so the little circuit attached to it sharpens this to 700 ps, which is much more useful for my work. The photo shows a Siglent SDS1102CML oscilloscope on the bench that I’m currently evaluating. It’s amazing how much capability gets packed into these inexpensive instruments.

The place is actually packed with oscilloscopes and logic analyzers, but most are tucked away. I don’t know how many of those little USB oscilloscope/logic analyzers vendors have sent for reviews. I’m partial to bench instruments, but do like the fact that the USB instruments are typically quite cheap. Most have so-so analog performance but the digital sampling is generally great.

Only barely visible in the picture, under the bench there’s an oscilloscope from 1946 with a 2” CRT I got on eBay just for fun. It’s a piece of garbage with a very nonlinear timebase, but a lot of fun. The beam is aimed by moving a magnet around! Including the CRT there are only four tubes. Can you imagine making anything with just four transistors today?

The big signal generator is a Hewlett-Packward 8640B, one of the finest ever made with astonishing spectral purity and a 0.5-dB amplitude flatness across 0.5 MHz to 1 GHz. A couple of digital multimeters and a pair of power supplies are visible as well. The KORAD supply has a USB connection and a serviceable, if klunky, PC application that drives it. Sometimes an experiment needs a slowly changing voltage, which the KORAD manages pretty well.

They’re mostly packed away, but I have a ton of evaluation kits and development boards. A Xilinx MicroZed is shown on the bench. It’s is a very cool board that has a pair of Cortex-A9s plus FPGA fabric in a single chip.

I use IDEs and debuggers from, well, everyone: Microchip Technology, IAR Systems, Keil, Segger, you name it. These run on a variety of processors but, along with so many others, more and more I’m using Cortex-M series parts.

My usual lab work is either evaluating boards, products and instruments, or running experiments that turn into articles. It pains me to see so much engineering is done via superstition today. For example, people pick switch contact debounce times based on hearsay or smoke signals or something. Engineers need data, so I tested about 50 pairs of switches to determine what real bounce characteristics are. The results are on my website. Ditto for watchdog timers and other important issues embedded people deal with.

Ganssle notes that his other “bench” is his woodworking shop. To learn more about Ganssle, read our 2013 interview.

Real-Time Processing for PCIe Digitizers

Agilent U5303A PCIe 12bit High-Speed DigitizerThe U5303A digitizer and the U5340A FPGA development kit are recent enhancements to Agilent Technologies’s PCI Express (PCIe) high-speed digitizers. The U5303A and the U5340A FPGA add next-generation real-time peak detection functionalities to the PCIe devices.

The U5303A is a 12-bit PCIe digitizer with programmable on-board processing. It offers high performance in a small footprint, making it an ideal platform for many commercial, industrial, and aerospace and defense embedded systems. A data processing unit (DPU) based on the Xilinx Virtex-6 FPGA is at the heart of the U5303A. The DPU controls the module functionality, data flow, and real-time signal processing. This feature enables data reduction and storage to be carried out at the digitizer level, minimizing transfer volumes and accelerating analysis.

The U5340A FPGA development kit is designed to help companies and researchers protect their IP signal-processing algorithms. The FPGA kit enables integration of an advanced real-time signal processing algorithm within Agilent Technologies’s high-speed digitizers. The U5340A features high-speed medical imaging, analytical time-of-flight, lidar ranging, non-destructive testing, and a direct interface to digitizer hardware elements (e.g., the ADC, clock manager, and memory blocks). The FPGA kit includes a library of building blocks, from basic gates to dual-port RAM; a set of IP cores; and ready-to-use scripts that handle all aspects of the build flow.

Contact Agilent Technologies for pricing.

Agilent Technologies, Inc.
www.agilent.com

All-Programmable SoC Solution

Anyone creating a complex, powerful digital design may want to turn to a single device that integrates high-speed processing and programmable logic.

In Circuit Cellar’s April issue, columnist Colin O’Flynn explores using the Xilinx Zynq  Z-7020 All Programmable SoC (system-on-a-chip) as part of the Avnet ZedBoard development board.

“I used a Xilinx Zynq SoC device, although Altera offers several flavors of a similar device (e.g., the Cyclone V SoC, the Arria V SoC, and the Arria 10 SoC), and Microsemi offers the SmartFusion2 SoC FPGA,” O’Flynn says in his article. “The Xilinx and Altera devices feature a dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 processor, whereas the Microsemi devices feature a less powerful Cortex-M3 processor. You may not need a dual-core A9 processor, so ‘less powerful’ may be an advantage.”

While O’Flynn’s article introduces the ZedBoard, he notes many of its specifics also apply to the MicroZed board, a less expensive option with a smaller SoC. Xilinx’s Zynq device has many interesting applications made highly accessible through the ZedBoard and MicroZed boards, he says.

O’Flynn’s discussion of the Zynq SoC device includes the following excerpt. (The April issue, which includes O’Flynn’s full article, is available for membership download or single-issue purchase.)

WHERE’S THE BEEF?
Originally, I had planned to describe a complete demo project in this article. I was going to demonstrate how to use a combination of a custom peripheral and some of the hard cores to stream data from a parallel ADC device into DDR memory. But there wasn’t enough room to introduce the tools and cover the demo, so I decided to introduce the Zynq device (using the ZedBoard).

A demo project is available at ProgrammableLogicInPractice.com. Several tutorials for the Zynq device are available at xilinx.com and zedboard.org, so there isn’t any point in duplicating work! I’ve linked to some specific tutorials from the April 2014 post on ProgrammableLogicInPractice.com. Photo 1 shows the hardware I used, which includes a ZedBoard with my custom OpenADC board connected through the I/O lines.

An Avnet ZedBoard is connected to the OpenADC. The OpenADC provides a moderate-speed ADC (105 msps), which interfaces to the programmable logic (PL) fabric in Xilinx’s Zynq device via a parallel data bus. The PL fabric then maps itself as a peripheral on the hard-core processing system (PS) in the Zynq device to stream this data into the system DDR memory.

Photo 1: An Avnet ZedBoard is connected to the OpenADC. The OpenADC provides a moderate-speed ADC (105 msps), which interfaces to the programmable logic (PL) fabric in Xilinx’s Zynq device via a parallel data bus. The PL fabric then maps itself as a peripheral on the hard-core processing system (PS) in the Zynq device to stream this data into the system DDR memory.

FPGA PROCESSOR DESIGN 101
Even if you’re experienced in FPGA design, you may not have used Xilinx tools for processor-specific design. These tools include the Xilinx Platform Studio (XPS) and the Xilinx Software Development Kit (SDK). Before the advent of hard-core processors (e.g., Zynq), there have long existed soft-core processors, including the popular Xilinx MicroBlaze soft processor. The MicroBlaze system is completely soft core, so you can use the XPS tool to define the peripherals you wish to include. For the Zynq device, several hard-core peripherals are always present and you can choose to add additional soft-core (i.e., use the FPGA fabric) peripherals.

In a future article I will discuss different soft-core processor options, including some open-source third-party ones that can be programmed from the Arduino environment. For now, I’ll examine only the Xilinx tools, which are applicable to the Zynq device, along with the MicroBlaze core.

The ARM cores in the Zynq device are well suited to run Linux, which gives you a large range of existing code and tools to use in your overall solution. If you don’t need those tools, you can always run on “bare metal” (e.g., without Linux), as the tools will generate a complete base project for you that compiles and tests the peripherals (e.g., printing “Hello World” out the USART). To give you a taste of this, I’ve posted a demo video of bringing up a simple “Hello World” project in both Linux and bare metal systems on ProgrammableLogicInPractice.com.

The FPGA part of the Zynq device is called the programmable logic (PL) portion. The ARM side is called the processing system (PS) portion. You will find a reference to the SoC’s PL or PS portion throughout most of the tutorials (along with this article), so it’s important to remember which is which!

For either system, you’ll be starting with the XPS software (see Photo 2). This software is used to design your hardware platform (i.e., the PL fabric), but it also gives you some customization of the PS hard-core peripherals.

This is the main screen of the Xilinx Platform Studio (XPS) when configuring a Zynq design. On the left you can see the list of available soft-core peripherals to add to the design. You can configure any of the hard-core peripherals by choosing to enable or disable them, along with selecting from various possible I/O connections. Additional screens (not shown) enable you to configure peripherals addressing information, configure I/O connections for the soft-core peripherals, and connect peripherals to various available extension buses.

Photo 2: This is the main screen of the Xilinx Platform Studio (XPS) when configuring a Zynq design. On the left you can see the list of available soft-core peripherals to add to the design. You can configure any of the hard-core peripherals by choosing to enable or disable them, along with selecting from various possible I/O connections. Additional screens (not shown) enable you to configure peripherals addressing information, configure I/O connections for the soft-core peripherals, and connect peripherals to various available extension buses.

MAKING THE CONNECTION
For example, clicking on the list of hard-core peripherals opens the options dialogue so you can enable or disable each peripheral along with routing the I/O connections. The ZedBoard’s Zynq device has 54 multipurpose I/O (MIO) lines that can be used by the peripherals, which are split into two banks. Each bank can use different I/O standards (e.g., 3.3 and 1.5 V).

Enabling all the peripherals would take a lot more than 54 I/O lines. Therefore, most of the I/O lines share multiple functions on the assumption that every peripheral doesn’t need to be connected. Many of the peripherals can be connected to several different I/O locations, so you (hopefully) don’t run into two peripherals needing the same I/O pin.

Almost all of the peripheral outputs can be routed to the PL fabric as well under the name EMIO, which is a dedicated 64-bit bus that connects to the PL fabric. If you simply wish to get more I/O pins, you can configure these extra pins from within XPS. But you can also use this EMIO bus to control existing cores in your FPGA fabric using peripherals on the Zynq device.

Assume you had an existing FPGA design where you had an FPGA core doing some processing connected to a microcontroller or computer via I2C, SPI, or serial. You could simply connect this core to the appropriate PS peripheral and port the existing code onto the Zynq processor by changing the low-level calls to use the Zynq peripherals. You may eventually wish to change this interface to the peripheral bus, the AMBA Advanced eXtensible Interface (AXI), for better performance. However, using standard peripherals to interface to a PL design can still be useful for many cores for which you have extensive existing code.

The MIO/EMIO pins can even be used in a bit-banging fashion, so if you need a special device or core control logic, it’s possible to quickly develop this in software. You can then move to a hardware peripheral for considerably better performance.

O’Flynn’s article goes on to discuss in greater detail the internal buses, peripherals, and taking a design from hardware to software. For more, refer to Circuit Cellar‘s  April issue and related application notes posted at O’Flynn’s companion site ProgrammableLogicInPractice.com.

Embedded Programming: Rummage Around In This Toolbox

Circuit Cellar’s April issue is nothing less than an embedded programming toolbox. Inside you’ll find tips, tools, and online resources to help you do everything from building a simple tracing system that can debug a small embedded system to designing with a complex system-on-a-chip (SoC) that combines programmable logic and high-speed processors.

Article contributor Thiadmer Riemersma describes the three parts of his tracing system: a set of macros to include in the source files of a device under test (DUT), a PC workstation viewer that displays retrieved trace data, and a USB dongle that interfaces the DUT with the workstation (p. 26).

Thaidmer Riemersma's trace dongle is connected to a laptop and device. The dongle decodes the signal and forwards it as serial data from a virtual RS-232 port to the workstation.

Thaidmer Riemersma’s trace dongle is connected to a laptop and DUT. The dongle decodes the signal and forwards it as serial data from a virtual RS-232 port to the workstation.

Riemersma’s special serial protocol overcomes common challenges of tracing small embedded devices, which typically have limited-performance microcontrollers and scarce interfaces. His system uses a single I/O and keeps it from bottlenecking by sending DUT-to-workstation trace transmissions as compact binary messages. “The trace viewer (or trace “listener”) can translate these message IDs back to the human-readable strings,” he says.

But let’s move on from discussing a single I/0 to a tool that offers hundreds of I/0s. They’re part of the all-programmable Xilinx Zynq SoC, an example of a device that blends a large FPGA fabric with a powerful processing core. Columnist Colin O’Flynn explores using the Zynq SoC as part of the Avnet ZedBoard development board (p. 46). “Xilinx’s Zynq device has many interesting applications,” O’Flynn concludes. “This is made highly accessible by the ZedBoard and MicroZed boards.”

An Avnet ZedBoard is connected to the OpenADC. The OpenADC provides a moderate-speed ADC (105 msps), which interfaces to the programmable logic (PL) fabric in Xilinx’s Zynq device via a parallel data bus. The PL fabric then maps itself as a peripheral on the hard-core processing system (PS) in the Zynq device to stream this data into the system DDR memory.

An Avnet ZedBoard is connected to the OpenADC. (Source: C. O’Flynn, Circuit Cellar 285)

Our embedded programming issue also includes George Novacek’s article on design-level software safety analysis, which helps avert hazards that can damage an embedded controller (p. 39). Bob Japenga discusses specialized file systems essential to Linux and a helpful networking protocol (p. 52).

One of the final steps is mounting the servomotor for rudder control. Thin cords connect the servomotor horn and the rudder. Two metal springs balance mechanical tolerances.

Jens Altenburg’s project

Other issue highlights include projects that are fun as well as instructive. For example, Jens Altenburg added an MCU, GPS, flight simulation, sensors, and more to a compass-controlled glider design he found in a 1930s paperback (p. 32). Columnist Jeff Bachiochi introduces the possibilities of programmable RGB LED strips (p. 66).