“Robocup” Soccer: Robot Designs Compete in Soccer Matches

Roboticists and soccer fans from around the world converged on Eindhoven, The Netherlands, from April 25–29 for the Roboup Dutch Open. The event was an interesting combination of sports and electronics engineering.

Soccer action at the Robocup Dutch Open

Since I have dozens of colleagues based in The Netherlands, I decided to see if someone would provide event coverage for our readers and members. Fortunately, TechtheFuture.com’s Tessel Rensenbrink was available and willing to cover the event. She reports:

Attending the Robocup Dutch Open is like taking a peek into the future. Teams of fully autonomous robots compete with each other in a soccer game. The matches are as engaging as watching humans compete in sports and the teams even display particular characteristics. The German bots suck at penalties and the Iranian bots are a rough bunch frequently body checking their opponents.

The Dutch Open was held in Eindhoven, The Netherlands from the 25th to the 29th of April. It is part of Robocup, a worldwide educational initiative aiming to promote robotics and artificial intelligence research. The soccer tournaments serve as a test bed for developments in robotics and help raise the interest of the general public. All new discoveries and techniques are shared across the teams to support rapid development.
The ultimate goal is to have a fully autonomous humanoid robot soccer team defeat the winner of the World Cup of Human Soccer in 2050.

In Eindhoven the competition was between teams from the Middle Size Robot League. The bots are 80 cm (2.6 ft) high, 50 cm (1.6 ft) in diameter and move around on wheels. They have an arm with little wheels to control the ball and a kicker to shoot. Because the hardware is mostly standardized the development teams have to make the difference with the software.

Once the game starts the developers aren’t allowed to aid or moderate the robots. Therefore the bots are equipped with all the hardware they need to play soccer autonomously. They’re mounted with a camera and a laser scanner to locate the ball and determine the distance. A Wi-Fi network allows the team members to communicate with each other and determine the strategy.

The game is played on a field similar to a scaled human soccer field. Playing time is limited to two halves of 15 minutes each. The teams consist of five players. If a robot does not function properly it may be taken of the field for a reset while the game continues. There is a human referee who’s decisions are communicated to the bots over the Wi-Fi network.

The Dutch Open finals were between home team TechUnited and MRL from Iran. The Dutch bots scored their first goal within minutes of the start of the game to the excitement of the predominantly orange-clad audience. Shortly thereafter a TechUnited bot went renegade and had to be taken out of the field for a reset. But even with a bot less the Dutchies scored again. When the team increased their lead to 3 – 0 the match seemed all but won. But in the second half MRL came back strong and had everyone on the edge of their seats by scoring two goals.

When the referee signaled the end of the game, the score was 3-2 for TechUnited. By winning the tournament the Dutch have established themselves as a favorite for the World Cup held in Mexico in June. Maybe, just maybe, the Dutch will finally bring home a Soccer World Cup trophy.

The following video shows a match between The Netherlands and Iran. The Netherlands won 2-1.

TechTheFuture.com is part of the Elektor group. 

 

Design West Update: Intel’s Computer-Controlled Orchestra

It wasn’t the Blue Man Group making music by shooting small rubber balls at pipes, xylophones, vibraphones, cymbals, and various other sound-making instruments at Design West in San Jose, CA, this week. It was Intel and its collaborator Sisu Devices.

Intel's "Industrial Controller in Concert" at Design West, San Jose

The innovative Industrial Controller in Concert system on display featured seven Atom processors, four operating systems, 36 paint ball hoppers, and 2300 rubber balls, a video camera for motion sensing, a digital synthesizer, a multi-touch display, and more. PVC tubes connect the various instruments.

Intel's "Industrial Controller in Concert" features seven Atom processors 2300

Once running, the $160,000 system played a 2,372-note song and captivated the Design West audience. The nearby photo shows the system on the conference floor.

Click here learn more and watch a video of the computer-controlled orchestra in action.

Design West Update: Compilers Unveiled

IAR Systems announced Tuesday at Design West in San Jose, CA, that GainSpan selected IAR Embedded Workbench as its primary development tool chain for MCU drivers and next-generation chip. “By standardizing on IAR Systems’ embedded software development tool chain, GainSpan will more easily support a wide range of MCUs to communicate with their modules,” IAR publicized a in a release.

It’s an important aspect of a larger plan, IAR’s ARM Strategic Accounts Manager Mike Skrtic said. IAR has overall tool chain standardization goals aimed at giving designers’ more flexibility when choosing MCUs for product development.

Remember: IAR Systems is teamed with Renesas for the RL78 Green Energy Challenge, which is administered by Circuit Cellar and Elektor. Designers are challenged to transform how the world experiences energy efficiency by developing a unique, low-power application using the RL78 MCU and IAR toolchain.

In other compiler-related news, Microchip Technology announced Monday at Design West its new MPLAB XC C compiler line, which supports its approximately 900 microcontrollers. Microchip’s Joe Drzewiecki said the compilers reduce code size by about 35% and improve code execution speed by about 30%. But you can judge for yourself because Microchip offers 8-, 16-, and 32-bit free editions of MPLAB XC compilers. According to Microchip reps, they are” fully functional and have no license restrictions for commercial use.”

So, if you give MPLAB XC a try, let us know what you think!

Read CircuitCellar.com for Updates/News from Design West, San Jose

Circuit Cellar and Elektor editors and staffers will attend Design West in San Jose, CA, from March 27 to 29. If you can’t make it to the conference, check www.CircuitCellar.com daily for conference updates, news, and more!

Feed the latest posts from CircuitCellar.com to your RSS reader! Doing so will keep you up-to-date on everything we post! Setting up the feed is simple.Add www.circuitcellar.com/feed/rss to your RSS reader and enjoy!

The Circuit Cellar/Elektor booth at ESC 2011 (San Jose, CA)

This year’s conference comprises seven summits at once: ESC, Android, Black Hat, DesignMED, LED, Sensors, and Multicore.

Members and clients are encouraged to stop by booth #2332 to chat with staff, subscribe to our magazines, grab free copies of the magazines, and check out our books. Readers should feel free to bring and pitch article proposals, book proposals, and project ideas!

 

Improved Radiation Meter Webinar

Want to learn about Elektor’s improved radiation meter? On February 16, Elektor technical editor Thijs Beckers will host a webinar at element14 about the radiation meter, which is a DIY system that can measure alpha, beta, and gamma radiation.

(Improved Radiation Meter – Source: Elektor.com)

According to Elektor, all that’s required to measure radiation is “a simple PIN photodiode and a suitable preamplifier circuit.” The system features “an optimized preamplifier and a microcontroller-based counter. The microcontroller takes care of measuring time and pulse rate, displaying the result in coun

ts per minute.The device we describe can be used with different sensors to measure gamma and alpha radiation. It is particularly suitable for long-term measurements and for examining weakly radioactive samples.”

Its FREE to register at www.element14.com/community/events/3185.

Start Time: 2/16/12 9:00 AM CST (America/Chicago)
End Time: 2/16/12 10:00 AM CST (America/Chicago)
Location: Online event

Elektor International Media is the parent company of Circuit Cellar.