Two Campuses, Two Problems, Two Solutions

In some ways, Salish Kootenai College (SKC)  based in Pablo, MT, and Penn State Erie, The Behrend College in Erie, PA, couldn’t be more different

SKC, whose main campus is on the Flathead Reservation, is open to all students but primarily serves Native Americans of the Bitterroot Salish, Kootenai, and Pend d’Orellies tribes. It has an enrollment of approximately 1,400. Penn State Erie has roughly 4,300.

But one thing the schools have in common is enterprising employees and students who recognized a problem on their campuses and came up with technical solutions. Al Anderson, IT director at the SKC, and Chris Coulston, head of the Computer Science and Software Engineering department at Penn State Erie, and his team have written articles about their “campus solutions” to be published in upcoming issues of Circuit Cellar.

In the summer of 2012, Anderson and the IT department he supervises direct-wired the SKC dorms and student housing units with fiber and outdoor CAT-5 cable to provide students better  Ethernet service.

The system is designed around the Raspberry Pi device. The Raspberry Pi queries the TMP102 temperature sensor. The Raspberry Pi is queried via the SNMP protocol.

The system is designed around the Raspberry Pi device. The Raspberry Pi queries the TMP102 temperature sensor. The Raspberry Pi is queried via the SNMP protocol.

“Prior to this, students accessed the Internet via a wireless network that provided very poor service.” Anderson says. “We wired 25 housing units, each with a small unmanaged Ethernet switch. These switches are daisy chained in several different paths back to a central switch.”

To maintain the best service, the IT department needed to monitor the system’s links from Intermapper, a simple network management protocol (SNMP) software. Also, the department had to monitor the temperature inside the utility boxes, because their exposure to the sun could cause the switches to get too hot.

This is the final installation of the Raspberry Pi. The clear acrylic case can be seen along with the TMP102 glued below the air hole drilled into the case. A ribbon cable was modified to connect the various pins of the TMP102 to the Raspberry Pi.

This is the final installation of the Raspberry Pi in the SKC system. The clear acrylic case can be seen along with the TMP102 glued below the air hole drilled into the case. A ribbon cable was modified to connect the various pins of the TMP102 to the Raspberry Pi.

“We decided to build our own monitoring system using a Raspberry Pi to gather temperature data and monitor the network,” Anderson says. “We installed a Debian Linux distro on the Raspberry Pi, added an I2C Texas Instruments TMP102 temperature sensor…, wrote a small Python program to get the temperature via I2C and convert it to Fahrenheit, installed SNMP server software on the Raspberry Pi, added a custom SNMP rule to display the temperature from the script, and finally wrote a custom SNMP MIB to access the temperature information as a string and integer.”

Anderson, 49, who has a BS in Computer Science, did all this even as he earned his MS in Computer Science, Networking, and Telecommunications through the Johns Hopkins University Engineering Professionals program.

Anderson’s article covers the SNMP server installation; I2C TMP102 temperature integration; Python temperature monitoring script; SNMP extension rule; and accessing the SNMP Extension via a custom MIB.

“It has worked flawlessly, and made it through the hot summer fine,” Anderson said recently. “We designed it with robustness in mind.”

Meanwhile, Chris Coulston, head of the Computer Science and Software Engineering department at Penn State Erie, and his team noticed that the shuttle bus

The mobile unit to be installed in the bus. bus

The mobile unit to be installed in the bus.

introduced as his school expanded had low ridership. Part of cause was the unpredictable timing of the bus, which has seven regular stops but also picks up students who flag it down.

“In order to address the issues of low ridership, a team of engineering students and faculty constructed an automated vehicle locator (AVL), an application to track the campus shuttle and to provide accurate estimates when the shuttle will arrive at each stop,” Coulston says.

The system’s three main hardware components are a user’s smartphone; a base station on campus; and a mobile tracker that stays on the traveling bus.

The base station consists of an XTend 900 MHz wireless modem connected to a Raspberry Pi, Coulston says. The Pi runs a web server to handle requests from the user’s smart phones. The mobile tracker consists of a GPS receiver, a Microchip Technology PIC 18F26K22 and an XTend 900 MHz wireless modem.

Coulston and his team completed a functional prototype by the time classes started in August. As a result, a student can call up a bus locater web page on his smartphone. The browser can load a map of the campus via the Google Maps JavaScript API, and JavaScript code overlays the bus and bus stops. You can see the bus locater page between 7:40 a.m. to 7 p.m. EST Monday through Friday.

“The system works remarkably well, providing reliable, accurate information about our campus bus,” Coulston says. “Best of all, it does this autonomously, with very little supervision on our part.  It has worked so well, we have received additional funding to add another base station to campus to cover an extended route coming next year.”

The base station for the mobile tracker is a sandwich of Raspberry Pi, interface board, and wireless modem.

The base station for the mobile tracker is a sandwich of Raspberry Pi, interface board, and wireless modem.

And while the system has helped Penn State Erie students make it to class on time, what does Coulston and his team’s article about it offer Circuit Cellar readers?

“This article should appeal to readers because it’s a web-enabled embedded application,” Coulston says. “We plan on providing users with enough information so that they can create their own embedded web applications.”

Look for the article in an upcoming issue. In the meantime, if you have a DIY wireless project you’d like to share with Circuit Cellar, please e-mail editor@circuitcellar.com.

 

 

 

 

Client Profile: Netburner, Inc

NetBurner, Inc.
5405 Morehouse Drive
San Diego, CA 92121

www.netburner.com

Contact: sales@netburner.com

Embedded Products/Services: The NetBurner solution provides hardware, software, and tools to network enable new and existing products. All components are integrated and fully functional, so you can immediately begin working on your application.

Product Categories:

  • Serial to Ethernet: Modules can be used out of the box with no programming, or you can use a development kit to create your own custom applications. Hardware ranges from a single chip to small modules with many features.
  • Core Modules: Typically used as the core processing module in a design, core modules include the processor, flash, RAM and on-board network capability. The processor pins are brought out to connectors and include functions such as SPI, I2C, address/data bus, ADC, DAC, UARTs, digital I/O, PWM, and CAN.
  • Development Kits: Development kits can be used to customize any of NetBurner’s Serial-to-Ethernet or Core Modules. Kits include the Eclipse IDE, a C/C++ compiler/linker, a debugger, a RTOS, a TCP/IP stack, and board support packages.

Product Information: The MOD54415 and the NANO54415 modules provide 250-MHz processor, up to 32 MB flash, 64 MB DDR, ADC, DAC, eight UARTs, four I2C, three SPI, 1-wire, microSD flash socket, five PWM, and up to 44 digital I/O.

Exclusive Offer: Receive 15% off on select development kits. Promo code: CIRCUITCELLAR


Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

Web-Based Remote I/O Control

The RIO-2010 is a web-based remote I/O control module. The Ethernet-ready module is equipped with eight relays, 16 photo-isolated digital inputs, and a 1-Wire interface for digital temperature sensor connection. The RIO-2010’s built-in web server enables you to access the I/O and use a standard web browser to remotely control the RIO-2010’s relay.

The RIO-2010 can be easily integrated into supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and industrial automation systems using the standard Modbus TCP protocol. The I/O module also comes with RS-485 serial interface for applications requiring Modbus RTU/ASCII. Its built-in web server enables you to use standard web-editing tools and Ajax dynamic page technology to customize your webpage.

Contact Artila for pricing.

Artila Electronics Co., Ltd.
www.artila.com

Client Profile: MicroDigital, Inc.

Micro Digital, Inc.
2900 Bristol Street, G 204,
Costa Mesa, CA 92626

www.smxrtos.com

Contact: David Moore

MDIEmbedded Products/Services: SMX® RTOS is a modular Real Time Operating System designed to meet the needs of small to medium-size embedded systems. It offers these modules: Preemptive multitasking kernel, TCP/IP dual IPv4/IPv6, 802.11a/b/g/i/n WiFi, USB Host/Device/OTG, flash file systems, GUI, security, IEEE 754 floating point, and more. Each is a strong product on its own, and all are tightly integrated to work well together. It offers good support for the latest ARM, Cortex, and ColdFire processors. See www.smxrtos.com/rtos and www.smxrtos.com/processors.

SMX® RTOS offers a broad selection of middleware modules, optional protocols, and drivers for the latest embedded processors. All are tightly integrated and work well together, so you can spend your time developing your product rather than gathering components from all over the Internet and integrating them. All are strong products on their own. SMX comes with full source code and simple, unambiguous, royalty-free licensing. You are free to modify our products in any way you wish and need not return changes to us.

 


Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

Client Profile: Netburner, Inc

NetBurner, Inc.
5405 Morehouse Drive
San Diego, CA 92121

www.netburner.com

Contact: sales@netburner.com

Embedded Products/Services: The NetBurner solution provides hardware, software, and tools to network enable new and existing products. All components are integrated and fully functional, so you can immediately begin working on your application.

Product Categories:

  • Serial to Ethernet: Modules can be used out of the box with no programming, or you can use a development kit to create your own custom applications. Hardware ranges from a single chip to small modules with many features.
  • Core Modules: Typically used as the core processing module in a design, core modules include the processor, flash, RAM and on-board network capability. The processor pins are brought out to connectors and include functions such as SPI, I2C, address/data bus, ADC, DAC, UARTs, digital I/O, PWM, and CAN.
  • Development Kits: Development kits can be used to customize any of NetBurner’s Serial-to-Ethernet or Core Modules. Kits include the Eclipse IDE, a C/C++ compiler/linker, a debugger, a RTOS, a TCP/IP stack, and board support packages.

Product Information: The MOD54415 and the NANO54415 modules provide 250-MHz processor, up to 32 MB flash, 64 MB DDR, ADC, DAC, eight UARTs, four I2C, three SPI, 1-wire, microSD flash socket, five PWM, and up to 44 digital I/O.

Exclusive Offer: Receive 15% off on select development kits. Promo code: CIRCUITCELLAR


Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

DIY 10.1˝ Touchscreen Home Control System

Domotics (home automation) control systems are among the most innovative and rewarding design projects creative electrical engineers can undertake. Let’s take a look at an innovative Beagle Board-based control system that enables a user to control lights with a 10.1˝ capacitive touchscreen.

Domotics control system

The design features the following modules:

• An I/O board for testing purposes
• An LED strip board for controlling an RGB LED strip
• A relay board for switching 230-VAC devices
• An energy meter for measuring on/off (and also for logging)

ELektor editor and engineer Clemens Valens recently interviewed Koen van Dongen about the design. Van Dongen describes the system’s electronics and then demonstrates how to use the touchscreen to control a light and LED strip.

As Valens explains suggests, it would be a worthwhile endeavor to incorporate a Wi-Fi connection to enable cellphone and tablet control. If you build such system, be sure to share it with our staff. Good luck!

CircuitCellar.com is an Elektor International Media website.