Gigabit Ethernet Designs

WurthWurth Electronics Midcom and Lantiq recently announced The Evaluation Kit, a jointly developed demonstration kit. The kit enables users to easily add Ethernet hardware to an application or device and provides all necessary information to understand the demands of an Ethernet hardware design.

The Evaluation Kit includes an easy-to-use 1-Gbps demonstration board. The (54-mm × 92-mm) credit card-sized demonstration board is powered by USB. The board plugs into PCs and provides up to 1-Gbps bidirectional data rates.

The Evaluation Kit costs approximately $175.

Wurth Electronics Midcom, Inc.
www.we-online.com

Lantiq
www.lantiq.com

Raspberry Pi-Based Network Monitoring Device

In 2012, Al Anderson, IT director at Salish Kootenai College in Pablo, MT, and his team wired the dorms and student housing units at the small tribal college with fiber and outdoor CAT 5 cable to provide reliable Internet service to students. “Our prior setup was wireless and did not provide very good service,” Anderson says.

The 25 housing units, each with a small unmanaged Ethernet switch, were daisy chained in several different paths. Anderson needed a way to monitor the links from the system’s Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) network monitoring software, Help/Systems’s InterMapper. He also wanted to ensure the switches installed inside the sun-exposed utility boxes wouldn’t get too hot.

The Raspberry Pi is a small SBC based on an ARM processor. Its many I/O ports make it very useful for embedded devices that need a little more power than the typical 8-bit microcontroller.

Photo 1: The Raspberry Pi is a small SBC based on an ARM processor. Its many I/O ports make it very useful for embedded devices that need a little more power than the typical 8-bit microcontroller.

His Raspberry Pi-based solution is the subject of an article appearing in Circuit Cellar’s April issue. “We chose the Raspberry Pi because it was less expensive, we had several on hand, and I wanted to see what I could do with it,” Anderson says (see Photo 1).

The article walks readers through each phase of the project:

“I installed a Debian Linux distro, added an I2C TMP102 temperature sensor from SparkFun Electronics, wrote a small Python program to get the temperature via I2C and convert it to Fahrenheit, installed an SNMP server on Linux, added a custom SNMP rule to display the temperature from the script, and finally wrote a custom SNMP MIB to access the temperature information as a string and integer.”

Setting up the SBC and Linux was simple, Anderson says. “The prototype Raspberry Pi has now been running since September 2012 without any problems,” he says in his article. “It has been interesting to see how the temperature fluctuates with the time of day and the level of network activity. As budget and time permit, we will be installing more of these onto our network.”

In the following excerpt, Anderson discusses the project’s design, implementation, and OS installation and configuration. For more details on a project inspired, in part, by the desire to see what a low-cost SBC can do, read Anderson’s full article in the April issue.

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION
Figure 1 shows the overall system design. The TMP102 is connected to the Raspberry Pi via I2C. The Raspberry Pi is connected to the network via its Ethernet port. The monitoring system uses TCP/IP over the Ethernet network to query the Raspberry Pi via SNMP. The system is encased in a small acrylic Adafruit Industries case, which we used because it is inexpensive and easy to customize for the sensor.

The system is designed around the Raspberry Pi SBC. The Raspberry Pi uses the I2C protocol to query the Texas Instruments TMP102 temperature sensor. The Raspberry Pi is queried via SNMP.

Figure 1: The system is designed around the Raspberry Pi SBC. The Raspberry Pi uses the I2C protocol to query the Texas Instruments TMP102 temperature sensor. The Raspberry Pi is queried via SNMP.

Our first step was to set up the Raspberry Pi. We started by installing the OS and the various software packages needed. Next, we wrote the Python script that queries the I2C temperature sensor. Then we configured the SNMP daemon to run the Python script when it is queried. With all that in place, we then set up the SNMP monitoring software that is configured with a custom MIB and a timed query. Finally, we modified the Raspberry Pi case to expose the temperature sensor to the air and installed the device in its permanent location.

OS INSTALLATION AND CONFIGURATION
The Raspberry Pi requires a Linux OS compiled to run on an ARM processor, which is the brain of the device, to be installed on an SD card. It does not have a hard drive. Setting up the SD card is straightforward, but you cannot simply copy the files onto the card. The OS has to be copied in such a way that the SD card has a boot sector and the Linux partitioning and file structure is properly maintained. Linux and Mac OS X users can use the dd command line utility to copy from the OS’s ISO image. Windows users can use a utility (e.g., Win32DiskImager) to accomplish the same thing. A couple of other utilities can be used to copy the OS onto the SD card, but I prefer using the command line.

A Debian-based distribution of Linux seems to be the most commonly used Linux distribution on the Raspberry Pi, with the Raspbian “wheezy” as the recommended distribution. However, for this project I chose Adafruit Learning Systems’s Occidentalis V0.2 Linux distribution because it had several hardware-hacker features rolled into the distribution, including the kernel modules for the temperature sensor. This saved me some work getting those installed and debugged.

Before you can copy the OS to the SD card, you need to download the ISO image. The Resources section of this article lists several sources including a link to the Adafruit Linux distribution. Once you have an ISO image downloaded, you can copy it to the SD card. The Resources section also includes a link to an Embedded Linux Wiki webpage, “RPi Easy SD Card Setup,” which details this copying process for several OSes.

The quick and dirty instructions are to somehow get the SD card hooked up to your computer, either using a built-in SD reader or a peripheral card reader. I used a USB attached reader. Then you need to format the card. The best format is FAT32, since it will get reformatted by the copy command anyway. Next, use your chosen method to copy the OS onto the card. On Linux or Mac OS X, the command:

dd bs=4M if=~/linux_distro.img of=/dev/sdd

will properly copy the OS onto the SD card.

You will need to change two important things in this command for your system. First, the
if parameter, which is the name the in file (i.e., your ISO image) needs to match the file you downloaded. Second, the of device (i.e., the out file or our SD drive in this case) needs to match the SD card. Everything, including devices, is a file in Linux, in case you are wondering why your SD drive is considered a file. We will see this again in a bit with the I2C device. You can toast your hard drive if you put the wrong device path in here. If you are unsure about this, you may want to use a GUI utility so you don’t overwrite your hard drive.

Once the OS is copied onto the SD card, it is time to boot up the Raspberry Pi. A default username and password are available from wherever you download the OS. With our OS, the defaults are “pi” and “raspberry.” Make it your first mission to change that password and maybe even add a new account if your project is going to be in production.

Another thing you may have to change is the IP address configuration on the Ethernet interface. By default, these distributions use DHCP to obtain an address. Unless you have a need otherwise, it is best to leave that be. If you need to use a static IP address, I have included a link in the Resources section with instructions on how to do this in Linux.

To access your Raspberry Pi, hook up a local keyboard and monitor to get to a command line. Once you have the network running and you know the IP address, you can use the SSH utility to gain access via the network.

To get SNMP working on the Raspberry Pi, you need to install two Debian packages: snmpd and snmp. The snmpd package is the actual SNMP server software that will enable other devices to query for SNMP on this device. The second package, snmp, is the client. It is nice to have this installed for local troubleshooting.

We used the Debian package manager, apt-get, to install these packages. The commands also must be run as the root or superuser.

The sudo apt-get install snmpd command installs the snmpd software. The sudo part runs the apt-get command as the superuser. The install and snmpd parts of the command are the arguments for the apt-get command.

Next we issued the
sudo apt-get install snmp command, which installed the SNMP client. Issue the ps -ax | grep snmpd command to see if the snmpd daemon is running after the install. You should see something like this:

1444 ? S 14:22 /usr/sbin/snmpd -Lsd -Lf /dev/null -u snmp -g snmp -I -smux -p /var/run/snmpd.pid

If you do not see a line similar to this, you can issue the sudo /etc/init.d/snmpd command start to start the service. Once it is running, it is time to turn your attention to the Python script that reads the temperature sensor. Configure the SNMP daemon after you get the Python script running.

The Raspberry Pi’s final installation is shown. The clear acrylic case can be seen along with the Texas Instruments TMP102 temperature sensor, which is glued below the air hole drilled into the case. We used a modified ribbon cable to connect the various TMP102 pins to the Raspberry Pi.

The Raspberry Pi’s final installation is shown. The clear acrylic case can be seen along with the Texas Instruments TMP102 temperature sensor, which is glued below the air hole drilled into the case. We used a modified ribbon cable to connect the various TMP102 pins to the Raspberry Pi.

WIZnet Announces WIZ550io & W5500 Discounts at EELive

Today at EELive! in San Jose, CA, WIZnet announced a special promotion tied to the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge, which it is sponsoring. For a limited time, WIZnet is offering discounted WIZ550io Ethernet controller modules and W5500 chips via its webshopWiznet-Challenge-EELive

Disclosure: Elektor International Media and Circuit Cellar comprise the challenge administration team.

At this time, WIZnet’s WIZ550io is on sale for $9.95 (original price, $17.00) and the W550 cost $1.49 (original price, $2.87).

WIZnet’s WIZ550io is a module for rapidly developing ’Net-enabled systems. It is an auto-configurable Ethernet controller module that includes the W5500 (TCP/IP-hard-wired chip and PHY embedded), a transformer, and an RJ-45 connector. The module has a unique, embedded real MAC address and auto network configuration capability.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

The W5500 is a hardwired TCP/IP embedded Ethernet controller that enables Internet connection for embedded systems using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI).

W5500

W5500

Visit the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge webpage for more information about participation and eligibility.

Internet of Things Challenge: WIZ55io Modules Moved Fast

As soon as the WIZNet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge launched on March 3, 2014, Internet of Things (IoT) innovators—from professional electrical engineers to creative electronics DIYers—around world began requesting free WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller modules. And due to the popular demand for the modules, the supply of free units ran out on March 11.

Although free modules are no longer available, anyone with a WIZ550io Ethernet module, or W5500 chip, may participate in the competition.

Participants can purchase eligible parts at shopwiznet.com or shop.wiznet.eu.

The WIZ550io is an auto-configurable Ethernet controller module that includes the W5500 (TCP/IP-hard-wired chip and PHY embedded), transformer, and an RJ-45 connector. The module has a unique, embedded real MAC address and auto network configuration capability.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

The W5500 chip is a Hardwired TCP/IP embedded Ethernet controller that enables Internet connection for embedded systems using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI).

W5500

W5500

The challenge is straightforward. Participants must implement a WIZ550io Ethernet module, or W5500 chip, in an innovative electronics design for a chance to win a share of $15,000 in prizes. The project submission deadline is August 3, 2014. For more information about the challenge, visit http://circuitcellar.com/wiznet2014/.

Sponsor: WIZnet

Remote Control and Monitoring of Household Devices

Raul Alvarez, a freelance electronic engineer from Bolivia, has long been interested in wireless device-to-device communication.

“So when the idea of the Internet of Things (IoT) came around, it was like rediscovering the Internet,” he says.

I’m guessing that his dual fascinations with wireless and the IoT inspired his Home Energy Gateway project, which won second place in the 2012 DesignSpark chipKIT challenge administered by Circuit Cellar.

“The system enables users to remotely monitor their home’s power consumption and control household devices (e.g., fans, lights, coffee machines, etc.),” Alvarez says. “The main system consists of an embedded gateway/web server that, aside from its ability to communicate over the Internet, is also capable of local communications over a home area wireless network.”

Alvarez catered to his interests by creating his own wireless communication protocol for the system.

“As a learning exercise, I specifically developed the communication protocol I used in the home area wireless network from scratch,” he says. “I used low-cost RF transceivers to implement the protocol. It is simple and provides just the core functionality necessary for the application.”

Figure1: The Home Energy Gateway includes a Hope Microelectronics RFM12B transceiver, a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board, and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 Ethernet controller chip.

Figure 1: The Home Energy Gateway includes a Hope Microelectronics RFM12B transceiver, a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board, and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 Ethernet controller chip.

Alvarez writes about his project in the February issue of Circuit Cellar. His article concentrates on the project’s TCI/IP communications aspects and explains how they interface.

Here is his article’s overview of how the system functions and its primary hardware components:

Figure 1 shows the system’s block diagram and functional configuration. The smart meter collects the entire house’s power consumption information and sends that data every time it is requested by the gateway. In turn, the smart plugs receive commands from the gateway to turn on/off the household devices attached to them. This happens every time the user turns on/off the controls in the web control panel.

Photo 1: These are the three smart node hardware prototypes: upper left,  smart plug;  upper right, a second smart plug in a breadboard; and at bottom,  the smart meter.

Photo 1: These are the three smart node hardware prototypes: upper left, smart plug; upper right, a second smart plug in a breadboard; and at bottom, the smart meter.

I used the simple wireless protocol (SWP) I developed for this project for all of the home area wireless network’s wireless communications. I used low-cost Hope Microelectronics 433-/868-/915-MHz RFM12B transceivers to implement the smart nodes. (see Photo 1)
The wireless network is configured to work in a star topology. The gateway assumes the role of a central coordinator or master node and the smart devices act as end devices or slave nodes that react to requests sent by the master node.

The gateway/server is implemented in hardware around a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board (see Photo 2). It uses an RFM12B transceiver to connect to the home area wireless network and a Microchip Technology ENC28J60 chip module to connect to the LAN using Ethernet.

As the name implies, the gateway makes it possible to access the home area wireless network over the LAN or even remotely over the Internet. So, the smart devices are easily accessible from a PC, tablet, or smartphone using just a web browser. To achieve this, the gateway implements the SWP for wireless communications and simultaneously uses Microchip Technology’s TCP/IP Stack to work as a web server.

Photo 2: The Home Energy Gateway’s hardware includes a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board and a custom shield board.

Photo 2: The Home Energy Gateway’s hardware includes a Digilent chipKIT Max32 board and a custom shield board.

Thus, the Home Energy Gateway generates and serves the control panel web page over HTTP (this page contains the individual controls to turn on/off each smart plug and at the same time shows the power consumption in the house in real-time). It also uses the wireless network to pass control data from the user to the smart plugs and to read power consumption data from the smart meter.

The hardware module includes three main submodules: The chipKIT Max 32 board, the RFM12B wireless transceiver, and the ENC28J60 Ethernet module. The smart meter hardware module has an RFM12B transceiver for wireless communications and uses an 8-bit Microchip Technology PIC16F628A microcontroller as a main processor. The smart plug hardware module shows the smart plugs’ main hardware components and has the same microcontroller and radio transceiver as the smart meter. But the smart plugs also have a Sharp Microelectronics S212S01F solid-state relay to turn on/off the household devices.

On the software side, the gateway firmware is written in C for the Microchip Technology C32 Compiler. The smart meter’s PIC16F628A code is written in C for the Hi-TECH C compiler. The smart plug software is very similar.

Alvarez says DIY home-automation enthusiasts will find his prototype inexpensive and capable. He would like to add several features to the system, including the ability to e-mail notifications and reports to users.

For more details, check out the February issue now available for download by members or single-issue purchase.