Mini PCIe Card Does Ethernet Over Fiber

Versalogic has announced the E4, a new Ethernet over fiber Mini PCIe expansion module for embedded computer systems. Ethernet over fiber offers an extremely dependable, highly secure Ethernet connection that operates over a much longer distance than copper. Where security matters, a fiber optic connection excels. Fiber optic cables have no electromagnetic signature, making them very difficult to tap compared to wired connections.

Veraslogic PR_MPEe-E4_HIVersalogic’s Ethernet over fiber card allows cable runs 5 times longer than Ethernet over copper. It protects against external electromagnetic interference and electrical surges. It also enables extreme security by removing the electro-magnetic signature from the connecting cables. The card supports full industrial temperature rating (-40° to +85°C) provides 1 Gbit/s speed with full duplex support.

The rugged E4 module provides a standardized way to add a bi-directional gigabit channel of Ethernet over fiber to an embedded computing solution. Using latching multi-mode LC type connectors, the E4 can transmit and receive data up to 550 m. The E4’s extremely small Mini PCIe format allows it to be added to an embedded computer board with very little impact to the overall size of the system. Compatible with a variety of popular x86 operating systems including Windows, Windows Embedded, and Linux, the E4 uses standard Ethernet software drivers.

Designed and tested for extended temperatures (-40° to +85°C), the E4 also meets MIL-STD-202G specifications to withstand high impact and vibration. The latching LC fiber optic connector provides additional protection within harsh environments. This new product is RoHS compliant, and includes VersaLogic’s 5+ year production life guarantee. The E4 is customizable, even in low OEM quantities. Customization options include conformal coating, revision locks, custom labeling, customized testing and screening. The VL-MPEe-E4E is available from stock at both Versalogic. and Digi-Key. Pricing is $275 in OEM quantities.

Versalogic | www.versalogic.com

IP65-Rated E3800-Based Panel PCs Feature Fanless Design

Winsystems has released its advanced IP65-rated panel PC delivering high reliability and an extended operating temperature range in a thin, fanless design. The PPC65B series offers a rugged design for extreme environments and industrial IoT applications ranging from -20ºC to +70ºC. Winsystems’ latest industrial PCs accommodate panel and VESA mounting configurations. When mounted properly, the sealed front bezel can be washed down with a pressure hose, making this series ideal for industrial control applications such as food processing and fleet management. The PPC65B series provides a low-profile solution for Human Machine Interface (HMI) and display applications in harsh environments that might otherwise require extensive packaging to protect the embedded computer.

Winsystems ppc65b-1x_a-1000x979These IP65-rated panel PCs, which support Linux and Windows 10 operating systems, use the 1.9 GHz Quad-Core Intel Atom processor and include up to 8 GB of RAM. They deliver fast graphics at high resolutions—1024 X 768 and 1280 x 1024—accessed via a five-wire resistive touchscreen. The rugged design also incorporates a SATA controller with 2.5-inch HDD/SSD and wide input power: 12 VDC to 24 VDC.

Optimal connectivity and I/O for embedded systems is achieved through 2x GbE Ethernet ports, a 1x USB 2.0 port (accommodating up to 3x with expansion) and 1x USB 3.0 port. A watchdog timer is included. The PPC65B series also includes options for expansion with 2x RS-232/422/485 plus 2x USB (default).

Winsystems | www.winsystems.com

Single-Chip, Multi-Protocol Switch for Intelligent Apps

Analog Devices recently introduced a real-time Ethernet, multi-protocol (REM) switch chip Ethernet connectivity solution for intelligent factory applications. Well suited for a variety of connected motion applications, you can use the “TSN-ready” (time sensitive networking) fido5000 with any processor, any protocol, and any stack.

The fido5000 two-port embedded Ethernet switch’s features, specs, and benefits include:

  • Reduces board size and power consumption while improving Ethernet performance at the node under any network load condition.
  • Attaches to Analog’s ADSP-SC58x, ADSP-2158x, and ADSP-CM40x motion control processors
  • Supports PROFINET RT/IRT, EtherNet/IP with beacon-based DLR, ModbusTCP, EtherCAT, SERCOS, and POWERLINK.
  • Achieves cycle times below 125 µs
  • Includes drivers for simple integration with any Industrial Ethernet protocol stack

The fido5100 is scheduled for full production in September 2017 and will cost $6 each in 1,000-piece quantities. The fido5200 (EtherCAT Capable) is also scheduled for full production in September 2017 and will cost $8 each in 1,000-piece quantities.

Analog Devices | www.analog.com

Single-Chip, Multi-Protocol Switch for Intelligent Apps

Analog Devices recently introduced a real-time Ethernet, multi-protocol (REM) switch chip Ethernet connectivity solution for intelligent factory applications. Well suited for a variety of connected motion applications, you can use the “TSN-ready” (time sensitive networking) fido5000 with any processor, any protocol, and any stack.

The fido5000 two-port embedded Ethernet switch’s features, specs, and benefits include:

  • Reduces board size and power consumption while improving Ethernet performance at the node under any network load condition.
  • Attaches to Analog’s ADSP-SC58x, ADSP-2158x, and ADSP-CM40x motion control processors
  • Supports PROFINET RT/IRT, EtherNet/IP with beacon-based DLR, ModbusTCP, EtherCAT, SERCOS, and POWERLINK.
  • Achieves cycle times below 125 µs
  • Includes drivers for simple integration with any Industrial Ethernet protocol stack

The fido5100 is scheduled for full production in September 2017 and will cost $6 each in 1,000-piece quantities. The fido5200 (EtherCAT Capable) is also scheduled for full production in September 2017 and will cost $8 each in 1,000-piece quantities.

Source: Analog Devices

Newly Ratified IEEE 802.3bz Standard Allows 5-Gb Ethernet of Existing Infrastructures

The Ethernet Alliance, the global consortium dedicated to the advancement of Ethernet technologies, hailed the ratification of the IEEE 802.3bz standard, allowing an upgrade path for existing infrastructures, considering the more than 70 billion meters of Cat5e/Cat6 cabling installed worldwide. The new IEEE standard allows network access layer bandwidth to evolve incrementally beyond 1 to 2.5 Gbps and 5 Gbps.

The new IEEE 802.3bz Standard for Ethernet Amendment: Media Access Control Parameters, Physical Layers and Management Parameters for 2.5 and 5 Gbps Operation (http://standards.ieee.org/develop/wg/WG802.3.html), enables access layer bandwidth to evolve incrementally beyond 1 Gbps and will help address emerging needs in a variety of settings and applications, including enterprise, wireless networks, and more.

Building upon the success of and laying out an upgrade path for 1000BASE-T, IEEE 802.3bz defines 2.5 Gb (2.5G) and 5 Gb (5G) BASE-T Ethernet. It specifies Ethernet Media Access Control (MAC) parameters, physical layer specifications (PHYs), and management objects for balanced twisted pair transmission media found in structured cabling. Facilitating up to five times the speed without requiring expensive infrastructure changes, IEEE 802.3bz enables cost-effective network bandwidth scaling. This enterprise technology addresses various needs, including scientific and research computing, content production and editing, industrial design and automation, machine vision, and more.

 

Source: Ethernet Alliance

10-Gb LAN with Power Over Ethernet

Würth Elektronik has expanded its portfolio of Ethernet modules with LAN transformers for speeds of up to 10 Gbps. The new transformers support Power over Ethernet (PoE) up to 100 W and currents up to 1 A per channel. Wurth 749053010

WE-LAN 10G has a bandwidth of up to 500 MHz and thus conforms to the IEEE Standard 802.3 with a bandwidth 3.5× larger than comparable gigabit Ethernet products. Thus, the transformers are well suited for applications involving large data volumes or requiring a swift transmission of data (e.g., the transmission of HD video data). In addition, the extended temperature range makes the modules a good option for industrial applications.

Free samples are available on request.

Source: Würth Elektronik

New Industrial-Grade Ethernet Physical-Layer transceiver

Microchip Technology recently announced the KSZ8061 single-chip 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX automotive- and industrial-grade Ethernet physical-layer transciever. Intended for data communication over low-cost Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cables,  it is the first of a new family based on the programmable Quiet-WIRE enhanced EMC technology, providing reduced line emissions and superior receiver immunity performance. LinkMD+ advanced cable diagnostics improves system reliability. Microchip KSZ8061

For energy-efficient applications, Microchip’s integrated EtherGREEN technology includes a unique Ultra Deep Sleep mode with signal-detect wakeup, which lowers standby power consumption to the sub-microampere range. With fast boot and linkup in less than 20 ms, the KSZ8061 is well suited for applications where startup time is critical. The KSZ8061 family is available with an extended temperature range of °40 to 105°Celsius for harsh-environment applications (e.g.,  industrial sensor networks and robotics). This Ethernet PHY transceiver family provides support for both the MII and RMII processor interfaces, for easy integration with numerous processors, MCUs and SoCs.

Microchip also has a new evaluation board, to enable functional and performance testing of the KSZ8061.  The $115 KSZ8061MNX evaluation board is now available for pre-ordering.

The KSZ8061 costs $1.16 each in 10,000-unit quantities for industrial grade. Volume-production availability is expected in early 2016.

Source: Microchip Technology

Arcturus uCMK64-IoT module: TLS security, Ethernet, Wi-Fi and more (Sponsored)

The Arcturus uCMK64-IoT is a 60x60mm module for developing secure IoT devices that require a combination of connectivity and control. The hardware uses a 120MHz, Freescale Kinetis K64 microcontroller with Ethernet, Wi-Fi, TLS security, peripheral connectivity and optional audio. The platform is controlled using a simple command protocol over a UART or TCP/IP socket, providing options for both host-MCU or cloud integration. The protocol supports I/O, bi-directional UART-to-net communication, device services and settings. A “call home” feature automatically originates the secure TLS socket connection to a remote server, helping to egress firewalls.

uCMK64-MOD-Top_PennyThe platform is fully compatible with the eco-system of Arcturus IoT tools, including Mbarx-System Manager, a powerful tool for securely managing entire network sites. Developers can easily connect, change firmware, configure, control or probe attached sensors and peripherals. An IoT apps store, provides direct access to firmware.

The uCMK64 is IoT made easy, no complex BSP or software system integration. The development kit contains everything you need to get started.

uCMK64-Kit_ContentsKey features:

  • 120MHz ARM® Cortex® M4 microcontroller
  • Ethernet with network stack
  • 11bgn Wi-Fi
  • Optional audio
  • Socket or UART control
  • Eco-system of IoT Tools
  • -40 to +85C parts rating

Firmware:

  • TLS based secure connectivity
  • I/O controls
  • UART-to-net peripheral connectivity
  • Optional VoIP, audio and PA firmware

How to buy:

  • uCMK64-IoT Development Kit
  • uCMK64-MOD – Module
  • uCMK64-SSB – Board

Learn more at ArcturusNetworks.com

Arcturus_Logo_WHT

Power Over Ethernet Solutions

Powering devices over Ethernet cabling seems easy, but there’s more to it
than meets the eye. In this article, Eddie Insam explains how it all works.

So you’ve designed a brand new Ethernet-based device. Perhaps it’s a clock, a weather sensor, or an industrial controller device. You plan to hang it proudly on your wall and connect it to a RJ-45 wall socket. But how are you going to power it? Where will the system get its juice? Surely, you aren’t going to disgrace your design with a brick wart. There must be a better way!

Why not feed power over the CAT-5 cable? Well, you’re not the first person to consider this technique.

The D-Link DWL-P50 is a ready-togo module. Ethernet in, Ethernet out, and a choice between 12- and 5-VDC outputs.

Photo 1: The D-Link DWL-P50 is a ready-togo module. Ethernet in, Ethernet out, and a choice between 12- and 5-VDC outputs.

Standard CAT-5 cable has four pairs, and only two are used for data in a typical 10- or 100-Mbps installation (see Figure 1a). So, it sounds obvious to stick a few DC volts down the spare pairs. Oh, yes. But hang on, life is never so simple. This is technology, remember? There has to be a catch somewhere. So, sit down and relax, I have the story.

Standard 10- and 100-Mbps Ethernet devices use just two of the four available pairs. The spare wires can be used to transmit power to the remote. Two possible methods are shown (b and c). But watch out! The power source must be smart enough to detect shorts and overloads and to avoid damaging components at the far end.

Figure 1: Standard 10- and 100-Mbps Ethernet devices use just two of the four available pairs. The spare wires can be used to transmit power to the remote. Two possible methods are shown (b and c). But watch out! The power source must be smart enough to detect shorts and overloads and to avoid damaging components at the far end.

It may not come as a surprise that the wise men at the IEEE thought about this for a while and came up with a standard (IEEE 802.3af). This standard has been around since 1999, but progress has been relatively slow. It started to take off only recently, mainly because of the availability of inexpensive specialist components. Tom Cantrell and Jeff Bachiochi have covered some of the available components and modules (Circuit Cellar 165 and 187). A wide range of parts are now available, including dedicated switching transistors, isolation transformers, and high-quality nonsaturating magnetics, making power over Ethernet (PoE) a practical proposition.

TECHNICALITIES
The IEEE document covers two main methods for sending power down the CAT-5 wire. One involves using the spare pairs. The other involves sharing with the existing data lines using center-tapped transformers (see Figures 1b and 1c). The latter method is beneficial when spare cable capacity isn’t available.

The method involving spare pins allows a decent amount of current to be drawn because the two spare pairs are paralleled together to increase capacity by reducing the total DC resistance. The present IEEE specifications allow up to 13 W of power to be transferred this way. This may not be enough for some heavy-duty devices, but it’s quite acceptable for medium-size and small items such as TV cameras and VoIP phones. An updated PoePlus standard is currently being considered. This will allow for up to 30-W capacity, while still remaining backwards compatible.

Transmitting power with center-tapped transformers is more limited. Pulse transformers and other magnetics in the Ethernet controller must be designed to take the full DC power load current without saturating. That isn’t an easy task for miniature surface-mounted components. The advantage of this alternative is that it leaves the extra pairs alone, an essential consideration in higher-speed gigabit Ethernet, which requires all four pairs to carry data.

POWER SUPPLY
Why can’t you just stick any old power supply across the spare wires? Because you don’t know what’s at the remote end, and you may run the risk of blowing up sensitive equipment. If you don’t believe me, take a look at Figure 2, which is a typical Ethernet terminator. This kind of circuitry is sometimes contained within a single metal enclosure called a MagJack.

This is a typical Ethernet termination. The resistors strapped to the spare data pins and center taps are there to balance the line and to reduce noise. They can quickly flash to smithereens in true Harry Potter style if any unmanaged DC power is placed on the cable.

Figure 2: This is a typical Ethernet termination. The resistors strapped to the spare data pins and center taps are there to balance the line and to reduce noise. They can quickly flash to smithereens in true Harry Potter style if any unmanaged DC power is placed on the cable.

Note the two 50-W resistors R3 and R4 across the center taps of transformers T3 and T4. They are branched in series to form an effective 150-W DC load across the input lines. Also note the two 50-W resistors R1 and R2 right across pins 7 and 8 and 4 and 5. These present a controlled impedance load to the otherwise non-terminated wires. They are there for robustness and noise reduction. This hookup is sometimes known as a Bob Smith termination.

If you connect a 48-VDC raw supply into such a socket, you will be driving a good third of an amp through these tiny resistors. This is guaranteed to vaporize them to kingdom come. Tiny SMD resistors are not built for such treatment.

Download the entire article.

NXP’s New Automotive Ethernet Product Portfolio

NXP Semiconductors has launched product portfolio for automotive Ethernet that builds on BroadR-ReachT, which is an automotive standard defined by theOPEN Alliance industry group. NXP’s automotive portfolio features two product families: Ethernet transceivers (TJA1100) and Ethernet switches (SJA1105).

The Ethernet PHY TJA1100 supports automotive low power modes. The systems sleep when the engine is off. However, the Ethernet PHY stays partially powered and wakes up the system only when there is network activity.NXP_AutomotiveEthernet

Transceivers (TJA1100):

  • Compliant with the OPEN Alliance BroadR-Reach (OABR) standard (IEEE: 100BASE-T1)
  • Designed via an automotive development flow
  • 6 × 6 mm² HVQFN package with minimal external component count
  • Supports low-power modes to save battery life
  • Automotive grade ESD and EMC

NXP’s SJA1105 Automotive Ethernet Switch uses Deterministic Ethernet technology to guarantee message latency in applications such as autonomous driving, where deterministic communication is vital for reasons of operational efficiency or functional safety. Deterministic Ethernet supports the trend toward increasing bandwidth requirements of up to one gigabit, while ensuring high reliability in networked control systems and high availability in fail-operational applications. It comprises several standards, including Ethernet (IEEE 802.3), Time-Triggered Ethernet (SAE AS6802) as well as Audio Video Bridging (AVB), and Time-Sensitive Networking (TSN).

Digital Switch (SJA1105):

  • Five-port automotive Ethernet Switch supporting up to 1-Gb network speed
  • Layer 2 Store and Forward Switch
  • MII/RMII/RGMII Interface
  • Port Mirroring and VLAN support (IEEE 802.1Q and IEEE 802.1P)
  • AVB and TSN support
  • Enables Deterministic Ethernet solutions

TJA1100 Ethernet transceivers are available in prototype samples. They will enter mass production in late 2015. SJA1105  Ethernet Switches are available upon request.

Source: NXP Semiconductors

ZestET2-NJ Gigabit Ethernet FPGA Module

Orange Tree Technologies recently launched the ZestET2-NJ high-performance Gigabit Ethernet FPGA module, which comprises a Gigabit Ethernet processing engine, Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA, DDR3 memory, and general-purpose I/O. Delivering the maximum sustained Ethernet bandwidth of over 100 MBps in both directions simultaneously, it is aimed at data acquisition and control applications in markets such as industrial vision, radar, sonar and medical imaging.OrangeTree-zestet2-nj

The Xilinx Artix-7 XC7A35T FPGA, which has more than 33,000 logic cells, 1.8 Mb of Block RAM and 90 DSP slices, is tightly coupled with 512 MB of 400-MHz DDR3 SDRAM, giving it an ample memory bandwidth of 1.6 GBps for high-speed processing and formatting of streaming data.  With ease of integration in mind, there are 105 FPGA I/O pins available for connection to the user’s equipment.

Orange Tree’s proprietary GigEx chip handles the entire TCP/IP stack at over 100 MBps in each direction simultaneously. It enables the User FPGA to be dedicated entirely to the application for maximum efficiency.  The module measures just 40 × 50 mm, making it ideal for integration into your products.

Source: Orange Tree Technologies

High-Speed, Conditioned Measurements with Channel-to-Channel Isolation

Measurement Computing Corp. recently announced the release of the SC-1608 Series of USB and Ethernet data acquisition devices. The series features analog signal conditioning that enables you to measure voltage, thermocouple, RTD, strain, frequency, and current. Isolated analog output and solid-state relays make it a good solution for systems requiring flexible conditioning and low cost per channel.MCC-SC-1608-Series

There are four devices in the SC-1608 Series with sample rates up to 500 ksps. Each device accommodates up to eight 8B isolated analog signal conditioning modules and eight solid state relay modules. Up to two isolated analog outputs are available on some models. Signal conditioning modules are sold separately.

Microsoft Windows software options for the SC-1608 include DAQami and TracerDAQ to display and log data, along with comprehensive support for C, C++, C#, Visual Basic, and Visual Basic .NET. Support is also included for DASYLab and NI LabVIEW. UL for Android provides programming support for Android devices. Open-source Linux drivers are also available.

The SC-1608 Series costs $999.

Source: Measurement Computing Corp.

Microcontroller-Based Sentry System

David Penrose’s “Sentry” project comprises an array of passive IR sensors placed throughout a building to track motion. The microcontroller-based system comprises an RF link to a processor along with an Ethernet module to unobtrusively monitor motion and activity levels.

The Sentry system uses commercial IR motion sensors (lower left) together with a customer vibration sensor (lower right) to determine where an individual is within a building. The base unit (top) integrates reports from these sensors to generate alerts to a caregiver.

Photo 1: The Sentry system uses commercial IR motion sensors (lower left) together with a customer vibration sensor (lower right) to determine where an individual is within a building. The base unit (top) integrates reports from these sensors to generate alerts to a caregiver.

Penrose writes:

My Sentry System is designed to assist those folks living alone who desire the peace of mind provided by a caregiver looking after them without the caregiver having to be present. Its implementation was facilitated by the WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet module, which provides a rich yet simple interface to the Internet. With a simple microprocessor, the system allows the status of a resident to be continuously monitored in a minimally intrusive fashion.

Any abnormal conditions can immediately be alerted to a remote caregiver for action. In this way, a caregiver’s smartphone acts as an alert system by letting them know when a resident’s activity deviates from a normal pattern. The system is designed to be simple to set up yet very flexible in its application so the needs of different residents can be addressed. A resident with minimal needs can be monitored by a set of relaxed rules, while a resident in need of more continuous observation can be assigned a set of strict rules. In all cases, the overarching design approach was to provide a system that augments the caregiver’s capability.

Penrose goes on to describe the system:

The Sentry System integrates motion sensors, a microprocessor, and the WIZ550io Ethernet interface to monitor a resident and report abnormal activity patterns to a remote caregiver (see Photo 1). The relationship of these subsystems is illustrated in Figure 1.

Up to eight sensors transmit activity to a base unit processor, which checks for abnormal behavior of a resident. Alerts to a caregiver are generated and communicated over the Internet.

Figure 1: Up to eight sensors transmit activity to a base unit processor, which checks for abnormal behavior of a resident. Alerts to a caregiver are generated and communicated over the Internet.

The primary sensors are IR motion sensors. These can be augmented by vibration sensors, pressure mats, ultrasonic, and other devices capable of detecting a person’s presence. These sensors are placed at key locations in a resident’s home to monitor movement from room to room or within rooms. The vibration sensors are placed in favorite chairs/couches or in the bed to determine if the furniture is occupied and if there is normal activity. All of these sensors are battery powered and report over an RF link. The RF reports from these devices are received by a base unit which then compares the resident’s location and activity to a set of rules that define normal behavior for different times of day. Any deviation from normal results in an SMS text message or e-mail being sent to the caregiver along with information about how to contact the resident. In most cases, it is expected that the caregiver would respond by phoning the resident to check on them.

The system is designed to be easy to install and operate. The WIZ550io’s Internet interface is used to communicate to a browser allowing the caregiver or resident to configure the system. This configuration consists of identifying sensors and rooms and describing a set of rules for each room for periods in the day. This local interface also allows for a review of all past activity once the system is operational. This history data is valuable for refining the rules to reduce false alarms and ensure security. Since the interface is behind the resident’s firewall, the system is secure from improper modification. The key output from the system is the alert to the caregiver, which relies on the WIZ550io module communicating to a service site such as Exosite. The site generates the alerts sent to the caregiver.

The base unit incorporates the WIZ550io, an 89LPC936 processor, a MCP79401 real-time clock, and a serial EEPROM to process reports received from the 433-MHz receiver.

Photo 2: The base unit incorporates the WIZ550io, an 89LPC936 processor, a MCP79401 real-time clock, and a serial EEPROM to process reports received from the 433-MHz receiver.

The system’s hardware consists of a base unit and multiple sensor/reporting units. The base unit (see Photo 2) comprises a WIZ550io Ethernet interface, an inexpensive microprocessor, an RF receiver, a battery backed-up real-time clock, and a serial EEPROM. All of these pieces are integrated into a small form factor case and powered by a plug-in transformer (see Figure 2).

Figure 2: The microprocessor accomplishes all of its tasks while using only a few of the available port pins.

Figure 2: The microprocessor accomplishes all of its tasks while using only a few of the available port pins.

The remote units can be one of many different sensor/reporting devices depending on the needs of the resident. The basic sensor is the IR motion sensor, which is available from a number of different sources.  I used Bunker Hill Security sensors, which I purchased from Harbor Freight Tools (Item 93068). A sensor plus receiver is very inexpensive. Some cost only $11. The item consists of a sensor/transmitter and a receiver/alarm device. The receiver/alarm device is not used in this project although the RF receiver was lifted from one of these units to provide the receiver for the base unit. These sensor units are powered by 9-V batteries and report on an RF link at 433 MHz with a unique address code.  The code allows multiple sensors to be deployed and recognized by the base unit.

The complete article appears in Circuit Cellar 296 (March 2015).

Dual Ethernet Module Operates as Independent Ports or Switch

The NetBurner MOD54417 network core module provides 10/100 Ethernet connectivity with two Ethernet ports. The ports can operate independently, each with its own MAC address, or as an Ethernet switch, simplifying network infrastructure (i.e., daisy chaining) by enabling Ethernet devices to connect through it.

Source: NetBurner

Source: NetBurner

The module is industrial temperature rated (–40 to +85°C) and also provides: 8 UARTs, 4 I2C, 2 CAN, 3 SPI, 1-Wire, a MicroSD flash card socket, 42 digital I/O, eight 12-bit analog-to-digital inputs, two 12-bit digital-to-analog outputs, and five PWM outputs.  Wireless 802.11 b/g/n communication is available with the optional Wi-Fi add-on.

The NetBurner Network Development Kit (NNDK) provides a complete software and tools package including the Real-Time Operating System, full featured TCP/IP Stack, Web Server, DHCP Server, Eclipse development environment, C/C++ compiler and debugger.  The NNDK is focused on ease of use and you will have your first custom program running within a few hours of receiving the kit. The price of the MOD54417 ranges $94 to $129.

Source: NetBurner

Gigabit Ethernet Designs

WurthWurth Electronics Midcom and Lantiq recently announced The Evaluation Kit, a jointly developed demonstration kit. The kit enables users to easily add Ethernet hardware to an application or device and provides all necessary information to understand the demands of an Ethernet hardware design.

The Evaluation Kit includes an easy-to-use 1-Gbps demonstration board. The (54-mm × 92-mm) credit card-sized demonstration board is powered by USB. The board plugs into PCs and provides up to 1-Gbps bidirectional data rates.

The Evaluation Kit costs approximately $175.

Wurth Electronics Midcom, Inc.
www.we-online.com

Lantiq
www.lantiq.com