2U HPC Server Sports Dual Intel Xeon Scalable Processors

WIN Enterprises has announced the PL-81890, a high performance 2U server platform with support for dual Intel Xeon Scalable Series processors, Trusted Platform Module (TPM) and storage features including twenty four 2.5-inch hot-swappable U.2 SSDs. I/O support includes 10GBASE-T, two ports of 10 Gbit Ethernet, two ports of 25 Gbit Ethernet, four ports of 10 Gbit Ethernet SFP+, one 1GBASE-T port dedicated to IPMI, plus three USB 2.0 ports. Up to two GPGPU cards are supported to visualize decision support data. Two M.2 NVMe slots are supported for high performance SSDs.

n onboard Trusted Platform Module (TPM) ensures the integrity of network processing for critical applications. A choice of three TPM modules is provided: TPM Module 1.2 with LPC, TPM Module 2.0 with LPC or TPM Module with eSPI.
The unit’s high performance processors and memory capacity of 3 Terabytes makes the unit appropriate for high-end, latency-sensitive operations, including transaction processing, scientific/real-time analytics, IoT cloud computing, virtualization, data mining, data warehousing and other critical applications.

Features:

  • 2U, 12 Bays TPCS System
  • Dual Intel Xeon Scalable Processor Platforms
  • (12) DDR4 ECC-RDIMM/LRDIMM/3DS LRDIMM 2133
  • (4+2) 1G BaseT LAN ports / (4) 10GbE SFP+
  • 80+ Platinum Certified 550W/850W CRPS
  • Supports 1.2 and 2.0 Trusted Platform Modules (TPM)
  • Supports (2) GPGPU graphics cards for AI applications

WIN Enterprises | www.win-ent.com

Commell Launches its First ARM-Based Pico-ITX

By Eric Brown

Commell has announced the LP-150, a Rockchip RK3128 based Pico-ITX SBC that appears to be its first ARM-based embedded board of any kind. The 100 mm x 72 mm LP-150 is the only ARM-based SBC out of the many dozens of mostly Intel-based boards listed on Commell’s SBC page.

Shipping with Android 4.4.4, but also supporting Linux, the LP-150 is intended primarily for imaging, machine vision and digital signage applications. Other Commell Pico-ITX SBCs include its Intel Braswell based LP-176.

Commell LP-150

Rockchip’s quad-core, Cortex-A7 RK3128 hasn’t seen as much uptake in the embedded world as the quad -A17 RK3288, which is found on hacker boards such as the Firefly-RK3288 Reload or the high-end, hexa-core RK3399, which has appeared on numerous recent products such as OpenEmbed’s em3399 module or Aaeon’s RICO-3399 PICO-ITX SBC. The only RK3128-based SBC we can recall is the open spec Firefly-FirePrime S.

The LP-150 SBC has a fairly modest feature set, with only 512 MB DDR3. Yet, it offers a few features you don’t typically find on x86 Pico-ITX SBCs like eMMC storage (8GB) and built-in Wi-Fi. Media features include an HDMI 1.4 port limited to HD resolution and an LVDS interface with capacitive touchscreen support. You also get CVBS inputs and outputs and audio I/O headers.

The LP-150 is further equipped with a GbE port and USB 2.0 host and OTG ports. There is also an RTC with battery, and a smattering of RS-232, UART, and GPIO interfaces.

Specifications listed for the Commell LP-150 include:

  • Processor — Rockchip RK3128 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.3 GHz); Mali-400 MP2 GPU with OpenGL ES1.1 and 2.0, OpenVG1.1
  • Memory — 512 MB DDR3
  • Storage — 8 GB eMMC; microSD slot
  • Display:
    • HDMI 1.4 port for up to 1080p
    • Single-channel 18/24-bit LVDS for up to 1280 x 720 displays or up to 1024 x 600 cap. touchscreens
    • LCD/LVDS panel and inverter connectors
    • CVBS in/out
  • Wireless — Wi-Fi with SMA antenna
  • Networking — Gigabit Ethernet port (RTL8211E)
  • Other I/O:
    • USB 2.0 host port with support for 4-port hub
    • USB 2.0 OTG port
    • 2x RS232 interfaces
    • 3x UART
    • Audio line-out, mic-in headers (Rockchip codec)
    • GPIO header
  • Other features — Power, recovery, reset buttons; RTC with lithium battery; LED
  • Operating temperature — 0 to 70°C
  • Power — DC input 5 V
  • Dimensions — 100 mm x 72 mm (Pico-ITX)
  • Operating system — Android 4.4.4; Linux also supported

Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the LP-150. More information may be found on Commell’s LP-150 product page.

Commell |  www.commell.com.tw

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on March 6.

Industrial Ethernet Switch on 3U cPCI

MEN Micro has announced the G102, a fully managed 3U flexible multiport Gbit switch, with a 29 Gbit/s switch matrix, implemented as a CompactPCI Serial board. It occupies one system slot or one peripheral slot using a 4 HP front panel with three Gbit Ethernet ports on M12 X-coded connectors on the front panel. The new backplane concept for MEN routers and switches allows high flexibility in network applications and management.

02g102-03_rightThe G102 guarantees high speed, high efficiency and an extensive firmware supporting various protocols like security, time synchronicity, stability, as well as for temperature needs. The switch supports EEE (Energy Efficient Ethernet) as a standard on all ports, IEEE1588v2 on ports 1 to 12 and SyncE (synchronous Ethernet) as an option.

The G102 either features three Ethernet ports on the front and up to 22 ports on the rear, or alternatively all 25 ports on the rear. These include 12 ports with integrated 10/100/1000 Mbit/s copper PHYs.

The switch is fault tolerant and restores itself on its own: If a link is temporarily unavailable, frames can be sent via backup/redundant links (spanning tree protocol/link aggregation) and no data loss occurs. Its built-in test mechanisms make the G102 an even more reliable component in the communication system. The railway Ethernet switch is specifically designed for rugged mobile communication systems and fully compliant with the EN 50155 railway standard, qualified for a -40 to +85°C operation temperature and ready for coating.

MEN Micro | www.menmicro.com

COM-Based SBCs Offer High I/O Density

Diamond Systems has released its ultra-small COM-based ZETA single board computer family. Highlights include interchangeable COM Express COMs for scalability and long product life, ultra- compact size and an rich amount of I/O, including a complete high-quality analog and digital data acquisition subsystem.

Designed in the COM Express Mini Type 10 form factor (84 mm x 55 mm / 3.3 in. x 2.2in.), the Zeta family offers performance scalability due to its use of COM Express CPU modules. Three processor options are currently available: Intel “Bay Trail” E3825 dual-core 1.33 GHz CPU with soldered 2 GB RAM; Intel “Apollo Lake” E3940 quad core 1.60 GHz CPU with soldered 4 GB RAM; and Intel “Apollo Lake” N4200 quad core 1.1 GHz (burstable to 2.5 GHz) CPU with soldered 8 GB RAM.

zeta-enlargedThe use of interchangeable CPU modules in the increasingly popular COM Express Mini Type 10 format enables Zeta to serve applications across a wide spectrum of price and performance needs. It also offers customers the longest possible product lifetime by vastly simplifying migration to a new CPU when the current one reaches its end of life. Zeta is an excellent choice for applications with expected lifetimes of 10 or more years, including military, medical, and transportation.

Zeta’s two-board COM + baseboard construction yields the highest feature density possible in a given footprint. The COM provides the core CPU functions, while the baseboard provides the “final inch” for all the system I/O plus the data acquisition subsystem, power supplies, and expansion sockets. Zeta provides as much as a 60% reduction in size compared to boards in larger form factors offering the same level of I/O.

Zeta’s impressive I/O list includes the following:

  • VGA display and Single-Channel LVDS port
  • Dual Gigabit Ethernet
  • 4 USB 2.0 Ports + 1 USB 3.0 port
  • 4 RS-232/422/485 ports with software-programmable protocol and termination
  • 16 digital IlO lines
  • Optional complete analog and digital data acquisition system
  • Integrated wide-range 6 V to 36 V power input circuit

Zeta is available in two I/O configurations, digital I/O only or digital + analog I/O. The DIO only circuit offers 16 DIO lines with selectable 3.3V/5V logic levels. The full circuit includes 16 channels of 16-bit A/D, 4 channels of 16-bit D/A, 27 digital I/O lines with selectable 3.3V/5V logic levels, and 8 32-bit counter/timers, all supported by Diamond’s free, industry-leading Universal Driver data acquisition programming library. An interactive graphical control panel for Windows and Linux is also provided to control all data acquisition features.

Zeta offers multiple options for system expansion and mass storage. It includes a PCIe Minicard / mSATA socket and a micro-SD socket. A unique expansion connector enables the installation of a daughterboard that contains an M.2 SATA SSD socket, a second PCIe Minicard socket, HD audio and 16 additional GPIO lines.

A built-in heat spreader efficiently removes heat from the SBC to keep the processor and all internal electronics cooler for improved reliability. The bottom-side mounting configuration of the heat spreader provides a secure and convenient mounting system for the board. It also simplifies the installation of I/O expansion modules by eliminating interference or airflow problems that can occur with traditional heat sinks. All three models of Zeta are tested for operation over the full industrial temperature range of -40°C to +85°C, making Zeta well suited for vehicle applications.

Diamond Systems | www.diamondsystems.com

December Circuit Cellar: A Sneak Preview

The December issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. Want a sneak peak? We’ve got a great selection of excellent embedded electronics articles for you.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 Here’s a sneak preview of December Circuit Cellar:

MICROCONTROLLERS IN MOTION

Special Feature: Electronics for Wearable Devices
Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child examines how today’s microcontrollers, sensors and power electronics enable today’s wearable products.

329 Cover Screen CapSimulating a Hammond Tonewheel Organ
(Part 2)

Brian Millier continues this two-part series about simulating the Hammond tonewheel organ using a microcontrollers and DACs. This time he examines a Leslie speaker emulation.

Money Sorting Machines (Part 1)
In this new article series, Jeff Bachiochi looks the science, mechanics and electronics that are key to sorting everything from coins to paper money. This month he discusses a project that uses microcontroller technology to sort coins.

Designing a Home Cleaning Robot (Part 1)
This four-part article series about building a home cleaning robot starts with Nishant Mittal discussing his motivations behind to his design concept, some market analysis and the materials needed.

SPECIAL SECTION: GRAPHICS AND VISION

Designing High Performance GUI
It’s critical to understand the types of performance problems a typical end-user might encounter and the performance metrics relevant to user interface (UI) design. Phil Brumby of Mentor’s Embedded Systems Division examines these and other important UI design challenges.

Building a Robotic Candy Sorter
Learn how a pair of Cornell graduates designed and constructed a robotic candy sort. It includes a three degree of freedom robot arm and a vision system using a Microchip PIC32 and Raspberry Pi module.

Raster Laser Projector Uses FPGA
Two Cornell graduates describe a raster laser projector they designed that’s able to project images in 320 x 240 in monochrome red. The laser’s brightness and mirrors positions are controlled by an FPGA and analog circuitry.

ELECTRICITY UNDER CONTROL

Technology Spotlight: Power-over-Ethernet Solutions
Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) enables the delivery of electric power alongside data on twisted pair Ethernet cabling. Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest chips, modules and other gear for building PoE systems.

Component Overstress
When an electronic component starts to work improperly, Two likely culprits are electrical overstress (EOS) and electrostatic discharge (ESD). In his article, George Novacek breaks down the important differences between the two and how to avoid their effects.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS:

Writing the Proposal
In this conclusion to his “Building an Embedded Systems Consulting Company” article series, Bob Japenga takes a detailed look at how to craft a Statement of Work (SOW) that will lead to success and provide clarity for all stakeholders.

Information Theory in a Nutshell
Claude Shannon is credited as one of the pioneers of computer science thanks to his work on Information Theory, informing how data flows in electronic systems. In this article, Robert Lacoste provides a useful exploration of Information Theory in an easily digestible way.

Mini PCIe Card Does Ethernet Over Fiber

Versalogic has announced the E4, a new Ethernet over fiber Mini PCIe expansion module for embedded computer systems. Ethernet over fiber offers an extremely dependable, highly secure Ethernet connection that operates over a much longer distance than copper. Where security matters, a fiber optic connection excels. Fiber optic cables have no electromagnetic signature, making them very difficult to tap compared to wired connections.

Veraslogic PR_MPEe-E4_HIVersalogic’s Ethernet over fiber card allows cable runs 5 times longer than Ethernet over copper. It protects against external electromagnetic interference and electrical surges. It also enables extreme security by removing the electro-magnetic signature from the connecting cables. The card supports full industrial temperature rating (-40° to +85°C) provides 1 Gbit/s speed with full duplex support.

The rugged E4 module provides a standardized way to add a bi-directional gigabit channel of Ethernet over fiber to an embedded computing solution. Using latching multi-mode LC type connectors, the E4 can transmit and receive data up to 550 m. The E4’s extremely small Mini PCIe format allows it to be added to an embedded computer board with very little impact to the overall size of the system. Compatible with a variety of popular x86 operating systems including Windows, Windows Embedded, and Linux, the E4 uses standard Ethernet software drivers.

Designed and tested for extended temperatures (-40° to +85°C), the E4 also meets MIL-STD-202G specifications to withstand high impact and vibration. The latching LC fiber optic connector provides additional protection within harsh environments. This new product is RoHS compliant, and includes VersaLogic’s 5+ year production life guarantee. The E4 is customizable, even in low OEM quantities. Customization options include conformal coating, revision locks, custom labeling, customized testing and screening. The VL-MPEe-E4E is available from stock at both Versalogic. and Digi-Key. Pricing is $275 in OEM quantities.

Versalogic | www.versalogic.com

IP65-Rated E3800-Based Panel PCs Feature Fanless Design

Winsystems has released its advanced IP65-rated panel PC delivering high reliability and an extended operating temperature range in a thin, fanless design. The PPC65B series offers a rugged design for extreme environments and industrial IoT applications ranging from -20ºC to +70ºC. Winsystems’ latest industrial PCs accommodate panel and VESA mounting configurations. When mounted properly, the sealed front bezel can be washed down with a pressure hose, making this series ideal for industrial control applications such as food processing and fleet management. The PPC65B series provides a low-profile solution for Human Machine Interface (HMI) and display applications in harsh environments that might otherwise require extensive packaging to protect the embedded computer.

Winsystems ppc65b-1x_a-1000x979These IP65-rated panel PCs, which support Linux and Windows 10 operating systems, use the 1.9 GHz Quad-Core Intel Atom processor and include up to 8 GB of RAM. They deliver fast graphics at high resolutions—1024 X 768 and 1280 x 1024—accessed via a five-wire resistive touchscreen. The rugged design also incorporates a SATA controller with 2.5-inch HDD/SSD and wide input power: 12 VDC to 24 VDC.

Optimal connectivity and I/O for embedded systems is achieved through 2x GbE Ethernet ports, a 1x USB 2.0 port (accommodating up to 3x with expansion) and 1x USB 3.0 port. A watchdog timer is included. The PPC65B series also includes options for expansion with 2x RS-232/422/485 plus 2x USB (default).

Winsystems | www.winsystems.com

Single-Chip, Multi-Protocol Switch for Intelligent Apps

Analog Devices recently introduced a real-time Ethernet, multi-protocol (REM) switch chip Ethernet connectivity solution for intelligent factory applications. Well suited for a variety of connected motion applications, you can use the “TSN-ready” (time sensitive networking) fido5000 with any processor, any protocol, and any stack.

The fido5000 two-port embedded Ethernet switch’s features, specs, and benefits include:

  • Reduces board size and power consumption while improving Ethernet performance at the node under any network load condition.
  • Attaches to Analog’s ADSP-SC58x, ADSP-2158x, and ADSP-CM40x motion control processors
  • Supports PROFINET RT/IRT, EtherNet/IP with beacon-based DLR, ModbusTCP, EtherCAT, SERCOS, and POWERLINK.
  • Achieves cycle times below 125 µs
  • Includes drivers for simple integration with any Industrial Ethernet protocol stack

The fido5100 is scheduled for full production in September 2017 and will cost $6 each in 1,000-piece quantities. The fido5200 (EtherCAT Capable) is also scheduled for full production in September 2017 and will cost $8 each in 1,000-piece quantities.

Analog Devices | www.analog.com

Single-Chip, Multi-Protocol Switch for Intelligent Apps

Analog Devices recently introduced a real-time Ethernet, multi-protocol (REM) switch chip Ethernet connectivity solution for intelligent factory applications. Well suited for a variety of connected motion applications, you can use the “TSN-ready” (time sensitive networking) fido5000 with any processor, any protocol, and any stack.

The fido5000 two-port embedded Ethernet switch’s features, specs, and benefits include:

  • Reduces board size and power consumption while improving Ethernet performance at the node under any network load condition.
  • Attaches to Analog’s ADSP-SC58x, ADSP-2158x, and ADSP-CM40x motion control processors
  • Supports PROFINET RT/IRT, EtherNet/IP with beacon-based DLR, ModbusTCP, EtherCAT, SERCOS, and POWERLINK.
  • Achieves cycle times below 125 µs
  • Includes drivers for simple integration with any Industrial Ethernet protocol stack

The fido5100 is scheduled for full production in September 2017 and will cost $6 each in 1,000-piece quantities. The fido5200 (EtherCAT Capable) is also scheduled for full production in September 2017 and will cost $8 each in 1,000-piece quantities.

Source: Analog Devices

Newly Ratified IEEE 802.3bz Standard Allows 5-Gb Ethernet of Existing Infrastructures

The Ethernet Alliance, the global consortium dedicated to the advancement of Ethernet technologies, hailed the ratification of the IEEE 802.3bz standard, allowing an upgrade path for existing infrastructures, considering the more than 70 billion meters of Cat5e/Cat6 cabling installed worldwide. The new IEEE standard allows network access layer bandwidth to evolve incrementally beyond 1 to 2.5 Gbps and 5 Gbps.

The new IEEE 802.3bz Standard for Ethernet Amendment: Media Access Control Parameters, Physical Layers and Management Parameters for 2.5 and 5 Gbps Operation (http://standards.ieee.org/develop/wg/WG802.3.html), enables access layer bandwidth to evolve incrementally beyond 1 Gbps and will help address emerging needs in a variety of settings and applications, including enterprise, wireless networks, and more.

Building upon the success of and laying out an upgrade path for 1000BASE-T, IEEE 802.3bz defines 2.5 Gb (2.5G) and 5 Gb (5G) BASE-T Ethernet. It specifies Ethernet Media Access Control (MAC) parameters, physical layer specifications (PHYs), and management objects for balanced twisted pair transmission media found in structured cabling. Facilitating up to five times the speed without requiring expensive infrastructure changes, IEEE 802.3bz enables cost-effective network bandwidth scaling. This enterprise technology addresses various needs, including scientific and research computing, content production and editing, industrial design and automation, machine vision, and more.

 

Source: Ethernet Alliance

10-Gb LAN with Power Over Ethernet

Würth Elektronik has expanded its portfolio of Ethernet modules with LAN transformers for speeds of up to 10 Gbps. The new transformers support Power over Ethernet (PoE) up to 100 W and currents up to 1 A per channel. Wurth 749053010

WE-LAN 10G has a bandwidth of up to 500 MHz and thus conforms to the IEEE Standard 802.3 with a bandwidth 3.5× larger than comparable gigabit Ethernet products. Thus, the transformers are well suited for applications involving large data volumes or requiring a swift transmission of data (e.g., the transmission of HD video data). In addition, the extended temperature range makes the modules a good option for industrial applications.

Free samples are available on request.

Source: Würth Elektronik

New Industrial-Grade Ethernet Physical-Layer transceiver

Microchip Technology recently announced the KSZ8061 single-chip 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX automotive- and industrial-grade Ethernet physical-layer transciever. Intended for data communication over low-cost Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cables,  it is the first of a new family based on the programmable Quiet-WIRE enhanced EMC technology, providing reduced line emissions and superior receiver immunity performance. LinkMD+ advanced cable diagnostics improves system reliability. Microchip KSZ8061

For energy-efficient applications, Microchip’s integrated EtherGREEN technology includes a unique Ultra Deep Sleep mode with signal-detect wakeup, which lowers standby power consumption to the sub-microampere range. With fast boot and linkup in less than 20 ms, the KSZ8061 is well suited for applications where startup time is critical. The KSZ8061 family is available with an extended temperature range of °40 to 105°Celsius for harsh-environment applications (e.g.,  industrial sensor networks and robotics). This Ethernet PHY transceiver family provides support for both the MII and RMII processor interfaces, for easy integration with numerous processors, MCUs and SoCs.

Microchip also has a new evaluation board, to enable functional and performance testing of the KSZ8061.  The $115 KSZ8061MNX evaluation board is now available for pre-ordering.

The KSZ8061 costs $1.16 each in 10,000-unit quantities for industrial grade. Volume-production availability is expected in early 2016.

Source: Microchip Technology

Arcturus uCMK64-IoT module: TLS security, Ethernet, Wi-Fi and more (Sponsored)

The Arcturus uCMK64-IoT is a 60x60mm module for developing secure IoT devices that require a combination of connectivity and control. The hardware uses a 120MHz, Freescale Kinetis K64 microcontroller with Ethernet, Wi-Fi, TLS security, peripheral connectivity and optional audio. The platform is controlled using a simple command protocol over a UART or TCP/IP socket, providing options for both host-MCU or cloud integration. The protocol supports I/O, bi-directional UART-to-net communication, device services and settings. A “call home” feature automatically originates the secure TLS socket connection to a remote server, helping to egress firewalls.

uCMK64-MOD-Top_PennyThe platform is fully compatible with the eco-system of Arcturus IoT tools, including Mbarx-System Manager, a powerful tool for securely managing entire network sites. Developers can easily connect, change firmware, configure, control or probe attached sensors and peripherals. An IoT apps store, provides direct access to firmware.

The uCMK64 is IoT made easy, no complex BSP or software system integration. The development kit contains everything you need to get started.

uCMK64-Kit_ContentsKey features:

  • 120MHz ARM® Cortex® M4 microcontroller
  • Ethernet with network stack
  • 11bgn Wi-Fi
  • Optional audio
  • Socket or UART control
  • Eco-system of IoT Tools
  • -40 to +85C parts rating

Firmware:

  • TLS based secure connectivity
  • I/O controls
  • UART-to-net peripheral connectivity
  • Optional VoIP, audio and PA firmware

How to buy:

  • uCMK64-IoT Development Kit
  • uCMK64-MOD – Module
  • uCMK64-SSB – Board

Learn more at ArcturusNetworks.com

Arcturus_Logo_WHT

Power Over Ethernet Solutions

Powering devices over Ethernet cabling seems easy, but there’s more to it
than meets the eye. In this article, Eddie Insam explains how it all works.

So you’ve designed a brand new Ethernet-based device. Perhaps it’s a clock, a weather sensor, or an industrial controller device. You plan to hang it proudly on your wall and connect it to a RJ-45 wall socket. But how are you going to power it? Where will the system get its juice? Surely, you aren’t going to disgrace your design with a brick wart. There must be a better way!

Why not feed power over the CAT-5 cable? Well, you’re not the first person to consider this technique.

The D-Link DWL-P50 is a ready-togo module. Ethernet in, Ethernet out, and a choice between 12- and 5-VDC outputs.

Photo 1: The D-Link DWL-P50 is a ready-togo module. Ethernet in, Ethernet out, and a choice between 12- and 5-VDC outputs.

Standard CAT-5 cable has four pairs, and only two are used for data in a typical 10- or 100-Mbps installation (see Figure 1a). So, it sounds obvious to stick a few DC volts down the spare pairs. Oh, yes. But hang on, life is never so simple. This is technology, remember? There has to be a catch somewhere. So, sit down and relax, I have the story.

Standard 10- and 100-Mbps Ethernet devices use just two of the four available pairs. The spare wires can be used to transmit power to the remote. Two possible methods are shown (b and c). But watch out! The power source must be smart enough to detect shorts and overloads and to avoid damaging components at the far end.

Figure 1: Standard 10- and 100-Mbps Ethernet devices use just two of the four available pairs. The spare wires can be used to transmit power to the remote. Two possible methods are shown (b and c). But watch out! The power source must be smart enough to detect shorts and overloads and to avoid damaging components at the far end.

It may not come as a surprise that the wise men at the IEEE thought about this for a while and came up with a standard (IEEE 802.3af). This standard has been around since 1999, but progress has been relatively slow. It started to take off only recently, mainly because of the availability of inexpensive specialist components. Tom Cantrell and Jeff Bachiochi have covered some of the available components and modules (Circuit Cellar 165 and 187). A wide range of parts are now available, including dedicated switching transistors, isolation transformers, and high-quality nonsaturating magnetics, making power over Ethernet (PoE) a practical proposition.

TECHNICALITIES
The IEEE document covers two main methods for sending power down the CAT-5 wire. One involves using the spare pairs. The other involves sharing with the existing data lines using center-tapped transformers (see Figures 1b and 1c). The latter method is beneficial when spare cable capacity isn’t available.

The method involving spare pins allows a decent amount of current to be drawn because the two spare pairs are paralleled together to increase capacity by reducing the total DC resistance. The present IEEE specifications allow up to 13 W of power to be transferred this way. This may not be enough for some heavy-duty devices, but it’s quite acceptable for medium-size and small items such as TV cameras and VoIP phones. An updated PoePlus standard is currently being considered. This will allow for up to 30-W capacity, while still remaining backwards compatible.

Transmitting power with center-tapped transformers is more limited. Pulse transformers and other magnetics in the Ethernet controller must be designed to take the full DC power load current without saturating. That isn’t an easy task for miniature surface-mounted components. The advantage of this alternative is that it leaves the extra pairs alone, an essential consideration in higher-speed gigabit Ethernet, which requires all four pairs to carry data.

POWER SUPPLY
Why can’t you just stick any old power supply across the spare wires? Because you don’t know what’s at the remote end, and you may run the risk of blowing up sensitive equipment. If you don’t believe me, take a look at Figure 2, which is a typical Ethernet terminator. This kind of circuitry is sometimes contained within a single metal enclosure called a MagJack.

This is a typical Ethernet termination. The resistors strapped to the spare data pins and center taps are there to balance the line and to reduce noise. They can quickly flash to smithereens in true Harry Potter style if any unmanaged DC power is placed on the cable.

Figure 2: This is a typical Ethernet termination. The resistors strapped to the spare data pins and center taps are there to balance the line and to reduce noise. They can quickly flash to smithereens in true Harry Potter style if any unmanaged DC power is placed on the cable.

Note the two 50-W resistors R3 and R4 across the center taps of transformers T3 and T4. They are branched in series to form an effective 150-W DC load across the input lines. Also note the two 50-W resistors R1 and R2 right across pins 7 and 8 and 4 and 5. These present a controlled impedance load to the otherwise non-terminated wires. They are there for robustness and noise reduction. This hookup is sometimes known as a Bob Smith termination.

If you connect a 48-VDC raw supply into such a socket, you will be driving a good third of an amp through these tiny resistors. This is guaranteed to vaporize them to kingdom come. Tiny SMD resistors are not built for such treatment.

Download the entire article.

NXP’s New Automotive Ethernet Product Portfolio

NXP Semiconductors has launched product portfolio for automotive Ethernet that builds on BroadR-ReachT, which is an automotive standard defined by theOPEN Alliance industry group. NXP’s automotive portfolio features two product families: Ethernet transceivers (TJA1100) and Ethernet switches (SJA1105).

The Ethernet PHY TJA1100 supports automotive low power modes. The systems sleep when the engine is off. However, the Ethernet PHY stays partially powered and wakes up the system only when there is network activity.NXP_AutomotiveEthernet

Transceivers (TJA1100):

  • Compliant with the OPEN Alliance BroadR-Reach (OABR) standard (IEEE: 100BASE-T1)
  • Designed via an automotive development flow
  • 6 × 6 mm² HVQFN package with minimal external component count
  • Supports low-power modes to save battery life
  • Automotive grade ESD and EMC

NXP’s SJA1105 Automotive Ethernet Switch uses Deterministic Ethernet technology to guarantee message latency in applications such as autonomous driving, where deterministic communication is vital for reasons of operational efficiency or functional safety. Deterministic Ethernet supports the trend toward increasing bandwidth requirements of up to one gigabit, while ensuring high reliability in networked control systems and high availability in fail-operational applications. It comprises several standards, including Ethernet (IEEE 802.3), Time-Triggered Ethernet (SAE AS6802) as well as Audio Video Bridging (AVB), and Time-Sensitive Networking (TSN).

Digital Switch (SJA1105):

  • Five-port automotive Ethernet Switch supporting up to 1-Gb network speed
  • Layer 2 Store and Forward Switch
  • MII/RMII/RGMII Interface
  • Port Mirroring and VLAN support (IEEE 802.1Q and IEEE 802.1P)
  • AVB and TSN support
  • Enables Deterministic Ethernet solutions

TJA1100 Ethernet transceivers are available in prototype samples. They will enter mass production in late 2015. SJA1105  Ethernet Switches are available upon request.

Source: NXP Semiconductors