Light-Weight Data Encryption for IoT and M2M Applications

LSE Technologies recently announced it is enabling secure end-to-end network data transfers for M2M applications and IoT devices with its Lightweight Stream Encryption Technology (LSET) C source code packages. LSE tech

Three versions of the LSET Professional product line are available for different levels of security and processing resources:

  • LSET Pro is targeted at 8-bit and low-end 16/32-bit microcontrollers and offers basic encryption algorithm for short control/status messages.
  • LSET ProX is targeted at mid-range 16/32-bit microcontrollers with an enhanced encryption/decryption engine and key security features. It is suitable for short control/status messaging as well as video and firmware updates.
  • LSET ProXT is targeted at higher end 32-bit microcontrollers and provides a more advanced encryption/decryption engine and additional key security features. It is suitable for longer messages such as in gateway applications as well as for video and firmware updates.

On a common 32-bit microcontroller, a typical implementation of the LSET ProX package would require about 600 bytes of code space plus 64 bytes of RAM and with a 20-MHz CPU clock encryption/decryption could be performed in about 2.5 µs per byte.

The LSET source code packages were designed to be easily incorporated into existing code bases. In many cases data encryption can be added to a product in just a few hours. The LSET Professional C source code packages start at $500 for the LSET Pro package.

Source: LSE Technologies

CC266: Microcontroller-Based Data Management

Regardless of your area of embedded design or programming expertise, you have one thing in common with every electronics designer, programmer, and engineering student across the globe: almost everything you do relates to data. Each workday, you busy yourself with acquiring data, transmitting it, repackaging it, compressing it, securing it, sharing it, storing it, analyzing it, converting it, deleting it, decoding it, quantifying it, graphing it, and more. I could go on, but I won’t. The idea is clear: manipulating and controlling data in its many forms is essential to everything you do.

The ubiquitous importance of data is what makes Circuit Cellar’s Data Acquisition issue one of the most popular each year. And since you’re always seeking innovative ways to obtain, secure, and transmit data, we consider it our duty to deliver you a wide variety of content on these topics. The September 2012 issue (Circuit Cellar 266) features both data acquisition system designs and tips relating to control and data management.

On page 18, Brian Beard explains how he planned and built a microcontroller-based environmental data logger. The system can sense and record relative light intensity, barometric pressure, relative humidity, and more.

a: This is the environmental data logger’s (EDL) circuit board. b: This is the back of the EDL.

Data acquisition has been an important theme for engineering instructor Miguel Sánchez, who since 2005 has published six articles in Circuit Cellar about projects such as a digital video recorder (Circuit Cellar 174), “teleporting” serial communications via the ’Net (Circuit Cellar 193), and a creative DIY image-processing system (Circuit Cellar 263). An informative interview with Miguel begins on page 28.

Turn to page 38 for an informative article about how to build a compact acceleration data acquisition system. Mark Csele covers everything you need to know from basic physics to system design to acceleration testing.

This is the complete portable accelerometer design. with the serial download adapter. The adapter is installed only when downloading data to a PC and mates with an eight pin connector on the PCB. The rear of the unit features three powerful
rare-earth magnets that enable it to be attached to a vehicle.

In “Hardware-Accelerated Encryption,” Patrick Schaumont describes a hardware accelerator for data encryption (p. 48). He details the advanced encryption standard (AES) and encourages you to consider working with an FPGA.

This is the embedded processor design flow with FPGA. a: A C program is compiled for a softcore CPU, which is configured in an FPGA. b: To accelerate this C program, it is partitioned into a part for the software CPU, and a part that will be implemented as a hardware accelerator. The softcore CPU is configured together with the hardware accelerator in the FPGA.

Are you now ready to start a new data acquisition project? If so, read George Novacek’s article “Project Configuration Control” (p. 58), George Martin’s article “Software & Design File Organization” (p. 62), and Jeff Bachiochi’s article “Flowcharting Made Simple” (p. 66) before hitting your workbench. You’ll find their tips on project organization, planning, and implementation useful and immediately applicable.

Lastly, on behalf of the entire Circuit Cellar/Elektor team, I congratulate the winners of the DesignSpark chipKIT Challenge. Turn to page 32 to learn about Dean Boman’s First Prize-winning energy-monitoring system, as well as the other exceptional projects that placed at the top. The complete projects (abstracts, photos, schematic, and code) for all the winning entries are posted on the DesignSpark chipKIT Challenge website.