IAR Systems Celebrates 10,000 Supported Devices

IAR Systems is proud to announce that its complete C/C++ development toolchain IAR Embedded Workbench now supports more than 10,000 devices, from all major microprocessor vendors. This unparalleled wide support puts IAR Embedded Workbench in a class of its own, enabling users to work with the same user-friendly development tools for virtually any device on the market.IARSystems1000

In order to provide support for the largest number of 8-, 16- and 32-bit devices, IAR Systems has established strategic partnerships with leading microprocessor vendors such as Renesas, Atmel, STMicroelectronics, Freescale and Texas Instruments. The strong relationships and longstanding knowledge sharing with partners enables IAR Systems to deliver the market’s most comprehensive processor support by a wide margin. This has made it possible for some of the world’s largest corporations and thousands of small and mid-sized companies to standardize their development on IAR Systems’ software, gaining unique flexibility and freedom from having to consider the choice of software in their selection of microprocessor. The fact that IAR Systems’ customers are able to maintain their development environment when changing processor platform and reuse most of their code saves them both time and money.

“10,000 supported devices is a milestone for us and we are really proud to provide our customers with the unique flexibility that this record confirms,” comments Mats Ullström, Chief Operating Officer, IAR Systems. “It is a fact that no other embedded toolchain comes close to offering such a broad device support, and in addition, we provide leading code performance and excellent code quality. Developers can build what they want in the platform of their choice and always feel confident that we support the device.”

IAR Embedded Workbench is a powerful development toolchain that incorporates a compiler, an assembler, a linker and a debugger into one completely integrated development environment. Find all supported devices at www.iar.com/device-search.

Embedded SIM Controllers for Secure M2M Communication

Secure cellular Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communication enables automated data exchange. Infineon Technologies recently announced the SLM 97 and SLI 97 security controller families. The new products stand out with unique features required for M2M communication in industrial as well as automotive applications such as emergency Call (eCall) and Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) communication.Infineon SLI97-SLM97

For the past 10 years, Infineon has provided high-quality security controllers used for M2M applications in the industrial and automotive sectors. For instance, Infineon supplies leading European car manufacturers with security controllers for eCall and other connectivity solutions for vehicles.

With the launch of the new SLM 97 and SLI 97 product families, Infineon strengthens its position in the growing industrial M2M and connected car markets. The new products enable the full implementation of embedded SIM as defined by GSMA and ETSI, increasing flexibility and simplifying the deployment of new M2M solutions.

Both SLM 97 and SLI 97 provide the following:

  • an extended temperature range from –40° to 105°C and high endurance for operation in demanding industrial and automotive environments
  • up to 1-MB SOLID FLASH memory, allowing fast prototyping and shortening time-to-market for device manufacturers
  • a set of hardware crypto-coprocessors supporting all relevant crypto schemes
  • a wide range of interfaces including ISO7816, SWP, USB, I2C, SPI to address a large variety of industrial and automotive applications
  • Common Criteria EAL 5+ (High) certification

The SLM 97 security controllers are tailored to industrial M2M applications requiring high endurance and robustness. They are qualified according to internationally recognized industrial standards and delivered in standard embedded M2M packages as well as in standard SIM card module.

The SLI 97 security controllers are qualified according to the high quality automotive standards (AEC-Q100) and tailored to the difficult environmental conditions of automotive applications. They pass through exhaustive quality processes to minimize failure rates. This makes them the perfect products for SIM cards or embedded security products in connected cars. Both families are based on field-proven products deployed in traditional Smart Card markets worldwide.

Source: Infineon Technologies

Skkynet Expands Secure Cloud Service Registration for Embedded and IoT System Users

Skkynet Cloud Systems recently opened registration for its Secure Cloud Service, giving system engineers and managers of industrial, embedded, and Internet of Things (IoT) systems quick and easy access to a secure, end-to-end solution for networking data in real time. The Secure Cloud Service enables bidirectional supervisory control, integration, and sharing of data with multiple users, and real-time access to selected data sets in a web browser. The service is capable of handling over 50,000 data changes per second per client, at speeds just a few milliseconds over Internet latency.Skkynet-scs012715-01hi

First opened on a trial basis for selected customers in August 2014, the Secure Cloud Service has been used extensively, and rigorously tested for performance and security. During that time Skkynet has enhanced the system technically by increasing the range of connectable embedded devices and the number of supported data protocols, as well as automating the customer registration process.

Skkynets Secure Cloud Service allows industrial and embedded systems to securely network live data in real time from any location. Secure by design, it requires no VPN, no open firewall ports, no special programming, and no additional hardware.

Source: Skkynet 

5th International PECCS Conference

The fifth edition of the PECCS conference (5th International Conference on
Pervasive and Embedded Computing and Communication Systems) organized by INSTICC (Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information, Control and Communication) will take place from the February 11-13, 2015 in Angers, Loire Valley, France.Peccs_2015_1

Pervasive and embedded computing and communication is a paradigm that aims at providing trustworthy computing solutions and communication services all the time and everywhere. This entails the need for an interdisciplinary field of R&D that combines signal processing with computer hardware and software technologies, and utilizes and integrates pervasive, wireless, embedded, wearable and/or mobile systems. Applications range from ambient intelligence to ubiquitous multimedia, multidimensional signal processing, sensors, robotics, integrated communication systems and nanotechnologies. PECCS will bring together researchers, engineers and practitioners interested in the theory and applications in these areas.

One of the most important contributions that PECCS brings about is the creation of a high-level forum in collaboration with the most prestigious internationally recognized experts, including names such as Muriel Medard (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States), Alois Ferscha (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, Austria), Bran Selic (University of Toronto, Canada), and Ian White (University of Cambridge, United Kingdom). Each will deliver a keynote lecture reflecting their knowledge on Mobile and Pervasive Computing, Digital Signal Processing and Embedded Systems Design.

All accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings, under an ISBN reference, on paper and on CD-ROM support. SCITEPRESS is a member of CrossRef and every paper is given a DOI (Digital Object Identifier). All papers presented at the conference venue will be available at the SCITEPRESS Digital Library. The proceedings will be submitted for indexation by Thomson Reuters Conference Proceedings Citation Index (ISI), INSPEC, DBLP, EI (Elsevier Index) and Scopus.

The main sponsor of this conference is INSTICC, in collaboration with several other international associations and institutions related to its main topic areas.

Further information about PHOTOPTICS 2015 can be found at the conference website.

# # #

About INSTICC

INSTICC is the Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information, Control and Communication, a scientific, non-profit, association whose main goals are to serve the international scientific community by promoting, developing and disseminating knowledge in the areas of information systems and technologies, control and communications.

To achieve these goals, INSTICC is committed to integrate and support many activities relevant for the international scientific community, including:

  • Promotion of the mobility of renowned researchers, usually involved as keynote speakers at INSTICC events, so that they can share their knowledge with conference delegates;
  • Providing grants to support the presence of many young researchers from all over the world, especially from regions facing economic difficulties, who wish to attend INSTICC conferences;
  • Publication of proceedings, books and journals – some of them in cooperation with distinguished international publishers – widely indexed and made available at appropriate digital libraries;
  • Sponsorship of research projects, proposed by universities and R&D institutes, related to INSTICC main interest areas;
  • Collaboration with international associations, who may technically  co-sponsor INSTICC events, as well as with companies involved in R&D or supporting of the international academic community.

Over the years, these initiatives have brought together a large and very diversified international community spread over more than 141 countries, including more than 500 high profile keynote speakers, over 15600 specialized reviewers and about 46000 authors.

PIC32MX1/2/5 Microcontrollers for Embedded Control & More

Microchip Technology’s new PIC32MX1/2/5 series enables a wide variety of applications, ranging from digital audio to general-purpose embedded control. The microcontroller series offers a robust peripheral set for a wide range of cost-sensitive applications that require complex code and higher feature integration.MicrochipPIC32MX125-starterkit

The microcontrollers feature:

  • Up to 83 DMIPS performance
  • Scalable memory options from 64/8-KB to 512/64-KB flash memory/RAM
  • Integrated CAN2.0B controllers with DeviceNet addressing support and programmable bit rates up to 1 Mbps, along with system RAM for storing up to 1024 messages in 32 buffers.
  •  Four SPI/I2S interfaces
  • A Parallel Master Port (PMP) and capacitive touch sensing hardware
  • A 10-bit, 1-Msps, 48-channel ADC
  • Full-speed USB 2.0 Device/Host/OTG peripheral
  • Four general-purpose direct memory access controllers (DMAs) and two dedicated DMAs on each CAN and USB module

 

Microchip’s MPLAB Harmony software development framework supports the MCUs. You can take advantage of Microchip’s software packages, such as Bluetooth audio development suites, Bluetooth Serial Port Profile library, audio equalizer filter libraries, various Decoders (including AAC, MP3, WMA and SBC), sample-rate conversion libraries, CAN2.0B PLIBs, USB stacks, and graphics libraries.

Microchip’s free MPLAB X IDE, the MPLAB XC32 compiler for PIC32, the MPLAB ICD3 in-circuit debugger, and the MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulation system also support the series.

The PIC32MX1/2/5 Starter Kit costs $69. The new PIC32MX1/2/5 microcontrollers with the 40-MHz/66 DMIPS speed option are available in 64-pin TQFP and QFN packages and 100-pin TQFP packages. The 50-MHz/83 DMIPS speed option for this PIC32MX1/2/5 series is expected to be available starting in late January 2015. Pricing starts at $2.75 each, in 10,000-unit quantities.

 

Source: Microchip Technology

Embedded Chip = Subdermal Chip?

Forget stashing your cash under your mattress. Now you can stash it under your skin. Sort of.

The Telegraph reported Tuesday that Martijn Wismeijer, a Dutch innovator, recently implanted a 12-mm xNTi NFC chip in his body to store Bitcoin. The small glass chip stores 888 bytes and comes with a syringe for installation.

According the Dangerous Things site, the kit includes:

  • Glass chip preloaded in EO gas sterilized injector
  • A skin antiseptic
  • Gauze pads, a bandage, and non-latex surgical gloves

 

Source: Telegraph

Freescale High-Sensitivity Accelerometer Family

Freescale recently introduced a new range of three-axis accelerometers offering high sensitivity at low power consumption. According to Freescale, the FXLN83xxQ family is capable of detecting acceleration information often missed by less accurate sensors commonly used in consumer products such as smartphones and exercise activity monitors. In conjunction with appropriate software algorithms, its improved sensitivity allows the new sensor to be used for equipment fault prognostication (for predictive maintenance), condition monitoring, and medical tamper detection applications.

Source: Freescale

Source: Freescale

The 3 mm × 3 mm chip has a bandwidth of 2.7 kHz and uses analog output signals for direct connection to a microcontroller’s ADC input. Each chip has two levels of sensitivity that can be changed on the fly. The complete family covers acceleration ranges of ±2, ±4, ±8, and ±16 g, with gains of, 229.0, 114.5, 57.25, and 28.62 mV/g, respectively. Zero g is indicated by an output level of 0.75 V.

The FXLN83xxQ family:

  • FXLN83x1Q ±2 or ±8 g range
  • FXLN83x2Q ±4 or ±16 g
  • FXLN836xQ 1.1 kHz x- and y-axis bandwidth (Z = 600 Hz)
  • FXLN837xQ 2.7 kHz x- and y-axis bandwidth (Z = 600 Hz)

The sensors operate from 1.71 to 3.6 V (at 180 µA typically, 30 nA shutdown). The company has also made available the DEMOFXLN83xxQ evaluation break-out board with a ready-mounted sensor to simplify device integration into a test and development environment.

Embedded Programming: Rummage Around In This Toolbox

Circuit Cellar’s April issue is nothing less than an embedded programming toolbox. Inside you’ll find tips, tools, and online resources to help you do everything from building a simple tracing system that can debug a small embedded system to designing with a complex system-on-a-chip (SoC) that combines programmable logic and high-speed processors.

Article contributor Thiadmer Riemersma describes the three parts of his tracing system: a set of macros to include in the source files of a device under test (DUT), a PC workstation viewer that displays retrieved trace data, and a USB dongle that interfaces the DUT with the workstation (p. 26).

Thaidmer Riemersma's trace dongle is connected to a laptop and device. The dongle decodes the signal and forwards it as serial data from a virtual RS-232 port to the workstation.

Thaidmer Riemersma’s trace dongle is connected to a laptop and DUT. The dongle decodes the signal and forwards it as serial data from a virtual RS-232 port to the workstation.

Riemersma’s special serial protocol overcomes common challenges of tracing small embedded devices, which typically have limited-performance microcontrollers and scarce interfaces. His system uses a single I/O and keeps it from bottlenecking by sending DUT-to-workstation trace transmissions as compact binary messages. “The trace viewer (or trace “listener”) can translate these message IDs back to the human-readable strings,” he says.

But let’s move on from discussing a single I/0 to a tool that offers hundreds of I/0s. They’re part of the all-programmable Xilinx Zynq SoC, an example of a device that blends a large FPGA fabric with a powerful processing core. Columnist Colin O’Flynn explores using the Zynq SoC as part of the Avnet ZedBoard development board (p. 46). “Xilinx’s Zynq device has many interesting applications,” O’Flynn concludes. “This is made highly accessible by the ZedBoard and MicroZed boards.”

An Avnet ZedBoard is connected to the OpenADC. The OpenADC provides a moderate-speed ADC (105 msps), which interfaces to the programmable logic (PL) fabric in Xilinx’s Zynq device via a parallel data bus. The PL fabric then maps itself as a peripheral on the hard-core processing system (PS) in the Zynq device to stream this data into the system DDR memory.

An Avnet ZedBoard is connected to the OpenADC. (Source: C. O’Flynn, Circuit Cellar 285)

Our embedded programming issue also includes George Novacek’s article on design-level software safety analysis, which helps avert hazards that can damage an embedded controller (p. 39). Bob Japenga discusses specialized file systems essential to Linux and a helpful networking protocol (p. 52).

One of the final steps is mounting the servomotor for rudder control. Thin cords connect the servomotor horn and the rudder. Two metal springs balance mechanical tolerances.

Jens Altenburg’s project

Other issue highlights include projects that are fun as well as instructive. For example, Jens Altenburg added an MCU, GPS, flight simulation, sensors, and more to a compass-controlled glider design he found in a 1930s paperback (p. 32). Columnist Jeff Bachiochi introduces the possibilities of programmable RGB LED strips (p. 66).

An Engineer Who Retires to the Garage

Jerry Brown, of Camarillo, CA, retired from the aerospace industry five years ago but continues to consult and work on numerous projects at home. For example, he plans to submit an article to Circuit Cellar about a Microchip Technology PIC-based computer display component (CDC) he designed and built for a traffic-monitoring system developed by a colleague.

Jerry Brown sits at his workbench. The black box atop the workbench is an embedded controller and is part of a traffic monitoring system he has been working on.

Jerry Brown sits at his workbench. The black box atop the workbench is an embedded controller and part of  his traffic monitoring system project.

“The traffic monitoring system is composed of a beam emitter component (BEC), a beam sensor component (BSC), and the CDC, and is intended for unmanned use on city streets, boulevards, and roadways to monitor and record the accumulative count, direction of travel, speed, and time of day for vehicles that pass by a specific location during a set time period,” he says.

Brown particularly enjoys working with PWM LED controllers. Circuit Cellar editors look forward to seeing his project article. In the meantime, he sent us the following description and pictures of the space where he conceives and executes his creative engineering ideas.

Jerry's garage-based lab.

Brown’s garage-based lab.

My workspace, which I call my “lab,” is on one side of my two-car garage and is fairly well equipped. (If you think it looks a bit messy, you should have seen it before I straightened it up for the “photo shoot.”)  

I have a good supply of passive and active electronic components, which are catalogued and, along with other parts and supplies, are stored in the cabinets and shelves alongside and above the workbench. I use the computer to write and compile software programs and to program PIC flash microcontrollers.  

The photos show the workbench and some of the instrumentation I have in the lab, including a waveform generator, a digital storage oscilloscope, a digital multimeter, a couple of power supplies, and a soldering station.  

The black box visible on top of the workbench is an embedded controller and is part of the traffic monitoring system that I have been working on.

Instruments in Jerry's lab include a waveform generator, a digital storage oscilloscope, a digital multimeter, a couple of power supplies, and a soldering station.

Instruments in Brown’s lab include a waveform generator, a digital storage oscilloscope, a digital multimeter, a couple of power supplies, and a soldering station. 

Brown has a BS in Electrical Engineering and a BS in Business Administration from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, CA. He worked in the aerospace industry for 30 years and retired as the Principal Engineer/Manager of a Los Angeles-area aerospace company’s electrical and software design group.

Industrial Temperature SBCs

EMACThe iPAC-9X25 embedded SBC is based on Atmel’s AT91SAM9X25 microprocessor. It is well suited for industrial temperature embedded data acquisition and control applications.
This web-enabled microcontroller can run an embedded server and display the current monitored or logged data. The web connection is available via two 10/100 Base-T Ethernet ports or 802.11 Wi-Fi networking. The iPAC-9X25’s connectors are brought out as headers on a board.

The SBC has a –40°C to 85°C industrial temperature range and utilizes 4 GB of eMMC flash, 16 MB of serial data flash (for boot), and 128 MB of DDR RAM. Its 3.77“ × 3.54“ footprint is the same as a standard PC/104 module.

The iPAC 9X25 features one RS-232 serial port with full handshake (RTS/CTS/DTR/DSR/RI), two RS-232 serial ports (TX and RX only), one RS-232/-422/-485 serial port with RTS/CTS handshake, two USB 2.0 host ports, and one USB device port. The board has seven channels of 12-bit audio/digital (0 to 3.3 V) and an internal real-time clock/calendar with battery backup. It also includes 21 GPIO (3.3-V) lines on header, eight high-drive open-collector dedicated digital output lines with configurable voltage tolerance, 16 GPIO (3.3 V) on header, two PWM I/O lines, five synchronous serial I/O lines (I2S), five SPI lines (two SPI CS), I2C bus, CAN bus, a microSD socket, external Reset button capabilities, and power and status LEDs.
The iPac-9X25 costs $198.

EMAC, Inc.
www.emacinc.com

Q&A: Scott Garman, Technical Evangelist

Scott Garman is more than just a Linux software engineer. He is also heavily involved with the Yocto Project, an open-source collaboration that provides tools for the embedded Linux industry. In 2013, Scott helped Intel launch the MinnowBoard, the company’s first open-hardware SBC. —Nan Price, Associate Editor

Scott Garman

Scott Garman

NAN: Describe your current position at Intel. What types of projects have you developed?

SCOTT: I’ve worked at Intel’s Open Source Technology Center for just about four years. I began as an embedded Linux software engineer working on the Yocto Project and within the last year, I moved into a technical evangelism role representing Intel’s involvement with the MinnowBoard.

Before working at Intel, my background was in developing audio products based on embedded Linux for both consumer and industrial markets. I also started my career as a Linux system administrator in academic computing for a particle physics group.

Scott was involved with an Intel MinnowBoard robotics and computer vision demo, which took place at LinuxCon Japan in May 2013.

Scott was involved with an Intel MinnowBoard robotics and computer vision demo, which took place at LinuxCon Japan in May 2013.

I’m definitely a generalist when it comes to working with Linux. I tend to bounce around between things that don’t always get the attention they need, whether it is security, developer training, or community outreach.

More specifically, I’ve developed and maintained parallel computing clusters, created sound-level management systems used at concert stadiums, worked on multi-room home audio media servers and touchscreen control systems, dug into the dark areas of the Autotools and embedded Linux build systems, and developed fun conference demos involving robotics and computer vision. I feel very fortunate to be involved with embedded Linux at this point in history—these are very exciting times!

Scott is shown working on an Intel MinnowBoard demo, which was built around an OWI Robotic Arm.

Scott is shown working on an Intel MinnowBoard demo, which was built around an OWI Robotic Arm.

NAN: Can you tell us a little more about your involvement with the Yocto Project (www.yoctoproject.org)?

SCOTT: The Yocto Project is an effort to reduce the amount of fragmentation in the embedded Linux industry. It is centered on the OpenEmbedded build system, which offers a tremendous amount of flexibility in how you can create embedded Linux distros. It gives you the ability to customize nearly every policy of your embedded Linux system, such as which compiler optimizations you want or which binary package format you need to use. Its killer feature is a layer-based architecture that makes it easy to reuse your code to develop embedded applications that can run on multiple hardware platforms by just swapping out the board support package (BSP) layer and issuing a rebuild command.

New releases of the build system come out twice a year, in April and October.

Here, the OWI Robotic Arm is being assembled.

Here, the OWI Robotic Arm is being assembled.

I’ve maintained various user space recipes (i.e., software components) within OpenEmbedded (e.g., sudo, openssh, etc.). I’ve also made various improvements to our emulation environment, which enables you to run QEMU and test your Linux images without having to install it on hardware.

I created the first version of a security tracking system to monitor Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) reports that are relevant to recipes we maintain. I also developed training materials for new developers getting started with the Yocto Project, including a very popular introductory screencast “Getting Started with the Yocto Project—New Developer Screencast Tutorial

NAN: Intel recently introduced the MinnowBoard SBC. Describe the board’s components and uses.

SCOTT: The MinnowBoard is based on Intel’s Queens Bay platform, which pairs a Tunnel Creek Atom CPU (the E640 running at 1 GHz) with the Topcliff Platform controller hub. The board has 1 GB of RAM and includes PCI Express, which powers our SATA disk support and gigabit Ethernet. It’s an SBC that’s well suited for embedded applications that can use that extra CPU and especially I/O performance.

Scott doesn’t have a dedicated workbench or garage. He says he tends to just clear off his desk, lay down some cardboard, and work on things such as the Trippy RGB Waves Kit, which is shown.

Scott doesn’t have a dedicated workbench or garage. He says he tends to just clear off his desk, lay down some cardboard, and work on things such as the Trippy RGB Waves Kit, which is shown.

The MinnowBoard also has the embedded bus standards you’d expect, including GPIO, I2C, SPI, and even CAN (used in automotive applications) support. We have an expansion connector on the board where we route these buses, as well as two lanes of PCI Express for custom high-speed I/O expansion.

There are countless things you can do with MinnowBoard, but I’ve found it is especially well suited for projects where you want to combine embedded hardware with computing applications that benefit from higher performance (e.g., robots that use computer vision, as a central hub for home automation projects, networked video streaming appliances, etc.).

And of course it’s open hardware, which means the schematics, Gerber files, and other design files are available under a Creative Commons license. This makes it attractive for companies that want to customize the board for a commercial product; educational environments, where students can learn how boards like this are designed; or for those who want an open environment to interface their hardware projects.

I created a MinnowBoard embedded Linux board demo involving an OWI Robotic Arm. You can watch a YouTube video to see how it works.

NAN: What compelled Intel to make the MinnowBoard open hardware?

SCOTT: The main motivation for the MinnowBoard was to create an affordable Atom-based development platform for the Yocto Project. We also felt it was a great opportunity to try to release the board’s design as open hardware. It was exciting to be part of this, because the MinnowBoard is the first Atom-based embedded board to be released as open hardware and reach the market in volume.

Open hardware enables our customers to take the design and build on it in ways we couldn’t anticipate. It’s a concept that is gaining traction within Intel, as can be seen with the announcement of Intel’s open-hardware Galileo project.

NAN: What types of personal projects are you working on?

SCOTT: I’ve recently gone on an electronics kit-building binge. Just getting some practice again with my soldering iron with a well-paced project is a meditative and restorative activity for me.

Scott’s Blinky POV Kit is shown. “I don’t know what I’d do without my PanaVise Jr. [vise] and some alligator clips,” he said.

Scott’s Blinky POV Kit is shown. “I don’t know what I’d do without my PanaVise Jr. [vise] and some alligator clips,” he said.

I worked on one project, the Trippy RGB Waves Kit, which includes an RGB LED and is controlled by a microcontroller. It also has an IR sensor that is intended to detect when you wave your hand over it. This can be used to trigger some behavior of the RGB LED (e.g., cycling the colors). Another project, the Blinky POV Kit, is a row of LEDs that can be programmed to create simple text or logos when you wave the device around, using image persistence.

Below is a completed JeeNode v6 Kit Scott built one weekend.

Below is a completed JeeNode v6 Kit Scott built one weekend.

My current project is to add some wireless sensors around my home, including temperature sensors and a homebrew security system to monitor when doors get opened using 915-MHz JeeNodes. The JeeNode is a microcontroller paired with a low-power RF transceiver, which is useful for home-automation projects and sensor networks. Of course the central server for collating and reporting sensor data will be a MinnowBoard.

NAN: Tell us about your involvement in the Portland, OR, open-source developer community.

SCOTT: Portland has an amazing community of open-source developers. There is an especially strong community of web application developers, but more people are hacking on hardware nowadays, too. It’s a very social community and we have multiple nights per week where you can show up at a bar and hack on things with people.

This photo was taken in the Open Source Bridge hacker lounge, where people socialize and collaborate on projects. Here someone brought a brainwave-control game. The players are wearing electroencephalography (EEG) readers, which are strapped to their heads. The goal of the game is to use biofeedback to move the floating ball to your opponent’s side of the board.

This photo was taken in the Open Source Bridge hacker lounge, where people socialize and collaborate on projects. Here someone brought a brainwave-control game. The players are wearing electroencephalography (EEG) readers, which are strapped to their heads. The goal of the game is to use biofeedback to move the floating ball to your opponent’s side of the board.

I’d say it’s a novelty if I wasn’t so used to it already—walking into a bar or coffee shop and joining a cluster of friendly people, all with their laptops open. We have coworking spaces, such as Collective Agency, and hackerspaces, such as BrainSilo and Flux (a hackerspace focused on creating a welcoming space for women).

Take a look at Calagator to catch a glimpse of all the open-source and entrepreneurial activity going on in Portland. There are often multiple events going on every night of the week. Calagator itself is a Ruby on Rails application that was frequently developed at the bar gatherings I referred to earlier. We also have technical conferences ranging from the professional OSCON to the more grassroots and intimate Open Source Bridge.

I would unequivocally state that moving to Portland was one of the best things I did for developing a career working with open-source technologies, and in my case, on open-source projects.

AMD Embedded G-Series SoC Solution

AvalueThe ECM-KA SBC is powered by the AMD Embedded G-Series 1st generation system-on-chip (SoC) accelerated processing unit (APU) based on 28-nm design technology. The AMD processors are built on Jaguar microarchitecture and integrate Quad-core CPU and next-generation graphics core.

The small-footprint ECM-KA provides extremely low power consumption, high graphic performance, multimedia, and I/O. The SBC is designed for embedded applications including industrial controls and automation, gaming, thin clients, retail/digital signage, SMB storage server, surveillance, medical, communication, entertainment, and data acquisition.

The ECM-KA supports one 204-pin DDR3 SODIMM socket that supports up to 8 GB DDR3 1600 SDRAM. It also supports dual-channel 18-/24-bit LVDS as well as HDMI, LVDS, and VGA multi-display configurations. The I/O deployment includes two SATA III, one mini PCIe, one CF, two USB 3.0, six USB 2.0, two COM, 8-bit DIO, and 2-Gb Ethernet. Multiple OS support including Windows 8, Windows 7, and Linux can be used in various embedded designs.

Contact Avalue for pricing.

Avalue Technology, Inc.
www.avalue.com.tw

MCU-Based Projects and Practical Tasks

Circuit Cellar’s January issue presents several microprocessor-based projects that provide useful tools and, in some cases, entertainment for their designers.

Our contributors’ articles in the Embedded Applications issue cover a hand-held PIC IDE, a real-time trailer-monitoring system, and a prize-winning upgrade to a multi-zone audio setup.

Jaromir Sukuba describes designing and building the PP4, a PIC-to-PIC IDE system for programming and debugging a Microchip Technology PIC18. His solar-powered,

The PP4 hand-held PIC-to-PIC programmer

The PP4 hand-held PIC-to-PIC programmer

portable computing device is built around a Digilent chipKIT Max32 development platform.

“While other popular solutions can overshadow this device with better UI and OS, none of them can work with 40 mW of power input and have fully in-house developed OS. They also lack PP4’s fun factor,” Sukuba says. “A friend of mine calls the device a ‘camel computer,’ meaning you can program your favorite PIC while riding a camel through endless deserts.”

Not interested in traveling (much less programming) atop a camel? Perhaps you prefer to cover long distances towing a comfortable RV? Dean Boman built his real-time trailer monitoring system after he experienced several RV trailer tire blowouts. “In every case, there were very subtle changes in the trailer handling in the minutes prior to the blowouts, but the changes were subtle enough to go unnoticed,” he says.

Boman’s system notices. Using accelerometers, sensors, and a custom-designed PCB with a Microchip Technology PIC18F2620 microcontroller, it continuously monitors each trailer tire’s vibration and axle temperature, displays that information, and sounds an alarm if a tire’s vibration is excessive.  The driver can then pull over before a dangerous or trailer-damaging blowout.

But perhaps you’d rather not travel at all, just stay at home and listen to a little music? This issue includes Part 1 of Dave Erickson’s two-part series about upgrading his multi-zone home audio system with an STMicroelectronics STM32F100 microprocessor, an LCD, and real PC boards. His MCU-controlled, eight-zone analog sound system won second-place in a 2011 STMicroelectronics design contest.

In addition to these special projects, the January issue includes our columnists exploring a variety of  EE topics and technologies.

Jeff Bachiochi considers RC and DC servomotors and outlines a control mechanism for a DC motor that emulates a DC servomotor’s function and strength. George Novacek explores system safety assessment, which offers a standard method to identify and mitigate hazards in a designed product.

Ed Nisley discusses a switch design that gives an Arduino Pro Mini board control over its own power supply. He describes “a simple MOSFET-based power switch that turns on with a push button and turns off under program control: the Arduino can shut itself off and reduce the battery drain to nearly zero.”

“This should be useful in other applications that require automatic shutoff, even if they’re not running from battery power,” Nisley adds.

Ayse K. Coskun discusses how 3-D chip stacking technology can improve energy efficiency. “3-D stacked systems can act as energy-efficiency boosters by putting together multiple chips (e.g., processors, DRAMs, other sensory layers, etc.) into a single chip,” she says. “Furthermore, they provide high-speed, high-bandwidth communication among the different layers.”

“I believe 3-D technology will be especially promising in the mobile domain,” she adds, “where the data access and processing requirements increase continuously, but the power constraints cannot be pushed much because of the physical and cost-related constraints.”

Member Profile: Walter O. Krawec

Walter O. Krawec

Walter O. Krawec

LOCATION:
Upstate New York

OCCUPATION:
Research Assistant and PhD Student, Stevens Institute of Technology

MEMBER STATUS:
Walter has been reading Circuit Cellar since he got his first issue in 1999. Free copies were available at the Trinity College Fire Fighting Robot Contest, which was his first experience with robotics. Circuit Cellar was the first magazine for which he wrote an article (“An HC11 File Manager,” two-part series, issues 129 and 130, 2001).

TECH INTERESTS:
Robotics, among other things. He is particularly interested in developmental and evolutionary robotics (where the robot’s strategies, controllers, and so forth are evolved instead of programmed in directly).

RECENT TECH ACQUISITION:
Walter is enjoying his Raspberry Pi. “What a remarkable product! I think it’s great that I can take my AI software, which I’ve been writing on a PC, copy it to the Raspberry Pi, compile it with GCC, then off it goes with little or no modification!”

CURRENT PROJECTS:
Walter is designing a new programming language and interpreter (for Windows/Mac/Linux, including the Raspberry Pi) that uses a simulated quantum computer to drive a robot. “What better way to learn the basics of quantum computing than by building a robot around one?” The first version of this language is available on his website (walterkrawec.org). He has plans to release an improved version.

THOUGHTS ON EMBEDDED TECH:
Walter said he is amazed with the power of the latest embedded technology, for example the Raspberry Pi. “For less than $40 you have a perfect controller for a robot that can handle incredibly complex programs. Slap on one of those USB battery packs and you have a fully mobile robot,” he said. He used a Pololu Maestro to interface the motors and analog sensors. “It all works and it does everything I need.” However, he added, “If you want to build any of this yourself by hand it can be much harder, especially since most of the cool stuff is surface mount, making it difficult to get started.”

Client Profile: Digi International, Inc

Contact: Elizabeth Presson
elizabeth.presson@digi.com

Featured Product: The XBee product family (www.digi.com/xbee) is a series of modular products that make adding wireless technology easy and cost-effective. Whether you need a ZigBee module or a fast multipoint solution, 2.4 GHz or long-range 900 MHz—there’s an XBee to meet your specific requirements.

XBee Cloud Kit

Digi International XBee Cloud Kit

Product information: Digi now offers the XBee Wi-Fi Cloud Kit (www.digi.com/xbeewificloudkit) for those who want to try the XBee Wi-Fi (XB2B-WFUT-001) with seamless cloud connectivity. The Cloud Kit brings the Internet of Things (IoT) to the popular XBee platform. Built around Digi’s new XBee Wi-Fi
module, which fully integrates into the Device Cloud by Etherios, the kit is a simple way for anyone with an interest in M2M and the IoT to build a hardware prototype and integrate it into an Internet-based application. This kit is suitable for electronics engineers, software designers, educators, and innovators.

Exclusive Offer: The XBee Wi-Fi Cloud Kit includes an XBee Wi-Fi module; a development board with a variety of sensors and actuators; loose electronic prototyping parts to make circuits of your own; a free subscription to Device Cloud; fully customizable widgets to monitor and control connected devices; an open-source application that enables two-way communication and control with the development board over the Internet; and cables, accessories, and everything needed to connect to the web. The Cloud Kit costs $149.