5th International PECCS Conference

The fifth edition of the PECCS conference (5th International Conference on
Pervasive and Embedded Computing and Communication Systems) organized by INSTICC (Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information, Control and Communication) will take place from the February 11-13, 2015 in Angers, Loire Valley, France.Peccs_2015_1

Pervasive and embedded computing and communication is a paradigm that aims at providing trustworthy computing solutions and communication services all the time and everywhere. This entails the need for an interdisciplinary field of R&D that combines signal processing with computer hardware and software technologies, and utilizes and integrates pervasive, wireless, embedded, wearable and/or mobile systems. Applications range from ambient intelligence to ubiquitous multimedia, multidimensional signal processing, sensors, robotics, integrated communication systems and nanotechnologies. PECCS will bring together researchers, engineers and practitioners interested in the theory and applications in these areas.

One of the most important contributions that PECCS brings about is the creation of a high-level forum in collaboration with the most prestigious internationally recognized experts, including names such as Muriel Medard (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States), Alois Ferscha (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, Austria), Bran Selic (University of Toronto, Canada), and Ian White (University of Cambridge, United Kingdom). Each will deliver a keynote lecture reflecting their knowledge on Mobile and Pervasive Computing, Digital Signal Processing and Embedded Systems Design.

All accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings, under an ISBN reference, on paper and on CD-ROM support. SCITEPRESS is a member of CrossRef and every paper is given a DOI (Digital Object Identifier). All papers presented at the conference venue will be available at the SCITEPRESS Digital Library. The proceedings will be submitted for indexation by Thomson Reuters Conference Proceedings Citation Index (ISI), INSPEC, DBLP, EI (Elsevier Index) and Scopus.

The main sponsor of this conference is INSTICC, in collaboration with several other international associations and institutions related to its main topic areas.

Further information about PHOTOPTICS 2015 can be found at the conference website.

# # #

About INSTICC

INSTICC is the Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information, Control and Communication, a scientific, non-profit, association whose main goals are to serve the international scientific community by promoting, developing and disseminating knowledge in the areas of information systems and technologies, control and communications.

To achieve these goals, INSTICC is committed to integrate and support many activities relevant for the international scientific community, including:

  • Promotion of the mobility of renowned researchers, usually involved as keynote speakers at INSTICC events, so that they can share their knowledge with conference delegates;
  • Providing grants to support the presence of many young researchers from all over the world, especially from regions facing economic difficulties, who wish to attend INSTICC conferences;
  • Publication of proceedings, books and journals – some of them in cooperation with distinguished international publishers – widely indexed and made available at appropriate digital libraries;
  • Sponsorship of research projects, proposed by universities and R&D institutes, related to INSTICC main interest areas;
  • Collaboration with international associations, who may technically  co-sponsor INSTICC events, as well as with companies involved in R&D or supporting of the international academic community.

Over the years, these initiatives have brought together a large and very diversified international community spread over more than 141 countries, including more than 500 high profile keynote speakers, over 15600 specialized reviewers and about 46000 authors.

PIC32MX1/2/5 Microcontrollers for Embedded Control & More

Microchip Technology’s new PIC32MX1/2/5 series enables a wide variety of applications, ranging from digital audio to general-purpose embedded control. The microcontroller series offers a robust peripheral set for a wide range of cost-sensitive applications that require complex code and higher feature integration.MicrochipPIC32MX125-starterkit

The microcontrollers feature:

  • Up to 83 DMIPS performance
  • Scalable memory options from 64/8-KB to 512/64-KB flash memory/RAM
  • Integrated CAN2.0B controllers with DeviceNet addressing support and programmable bit rates up to 1 Mbps, along with system RAM for storing up to 1024 messages in 32 buffers.
  •  Four SPI/I2S interfaces
  • A Parallel Master Port (PMP) and capacitive touch sensing hardware
  • A 10-bit, 1-Msps, 48-channel ADC
  • Full-speed USB 2.0 Device/Host/OTG peripheral
  • Four general-purpose direct memory access controllers (DMAs) and two dedicated DMAs on each CAN and USB module

 

Microchip’s MPLAB Harmony software development framework supports the MCUs. You can take advantage of Microchip’s software packages, such as Bluetooth audio development suites, Bluetooth Serial Port Profile library, audio equalizer filter libraries, various Decoders (including AAC, MP3, WMA and SBC), sample-rate conversion libraries, CAN2.0B PLIBs, USB stacks, and graphics libraries.

Microchip’s free MPLAB X IDE, the MPLAB XC32 compiler for PIC32, the MPLAB ICD3 in-circuit debugger, and the MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulation system also support the series.

The PIC32MX1/2/5 Starter Kit costs $69. The new PIC32MX1/2/5 microcontrollers with the 40-MHz/66 DMIPS speed option are available in 64-pin TQFP and QFN packages and 100-pin TQFP packages. The 50-MHz/83 DMIPS speed option for this PIC32MX1/2/5 series is expected to be available starting in late January 2015. Pricing starts at $2.75 each, in 10,000-unit quantities.

 

Source: Microchip Technology

Embedded Chip = Subdermal Chip?

Forget stashing your cash under your mattress. Now you can stash it under your skin. Sort of.

The Telegraph reported Tuesday that Martijn Wismeijer, a Dutch innovator, recently implanted a 12-mm xNTi NFC chip in his body to store Bitcoin. The small glass chip stores 888 bytes and comes with a syringe for installation.

According the Dangerous Things site, the kit includes:

  • Glass chip preloaded in EO gas sterilized injector
  • A skin antiseptic
  • Gauze pads, a bandage, and non-latex surgical gloves

 

Source: Telegraph

Freescale High-Sensitivity Accelerometer Family

Freescale recently introduced a new range of three-axis accelerometers offering high sensitivity at low power consumption. According to Freescale, the FXLN83xxQ family is capable of detecting acceleration information often missed by less accurate sensors commonly used in consumer products such as smartphones and exercise activity monitors. In conjunction with appropriate software algorithms, its improved sensitivity allows the new sensor to be used for equipment fault prognostication (for predictive maintenance), condition monitoring, and medical tamper detection applications.

Source: Freescale

Source: Freescale

The 3 mm × 3 mm chip has a bandwidth of 2.7 kHz and uses analog output signals for direct connection to a microcontroller’s ADC input. Each chip has two levels of sensitivity that can be changed on the fly. The complete family covers acceleration ranges of ±2, ±4, ±8, and ±16 g, with gains of, 229.0, 114.5, 57.25, and 28.62 mV/g, respectively. Zero g is indicated by an output level of 0.75 V.

The FXLN83xxQ family:

  • FXLN83x1Q ±2 or ±8 g range
  • FXLN83x2Q ±4 or ±16 g
  • FXLN836xQ 1.1 kHz x- and y-axis bandwidth (Z = 600 Hz)
  • FXLN837xQ 2.7 kHz x- and y-axis bandwidth (Z = 600 Hz)

The sensors operate from 1.71 to 3.6 V (at 180 µA typically, 30 nA shutdown). The company has also made available the DEMOFXLN83xxQ evaluation break-out board with a ready-mounted sensor to simplify device integration into a test and development environment.

Embedded Programming: Rummage Around In This Toolbox

Circuit Cellar’s April issue is nothing less than an embedded programming toolbox. Inside you’ll find tips, tools, and online resources to help you do everything from building a simple tracing system that can debug a small embedded system to designing with a complex system-on-a-chip (SoC) that combines programmable logic and high-speed processors.

Article contributor Thiadmer Riemersma describes the three parts of his tracing system: a set of macros to include in the source files of a device under test (DUT), a PC workstation viewer that displays retrieved trace data, and a USB dongle that interfaces the DUT with the workstation (p. 26).

Thaidmer Riemersma's trace dongle is connected to a laptop and device. The dongle decodes the signal and forwards it as serial data from a virtual RS-232 port to the workstation.

Thaidmer Riemersma’s trace dongle is connected to a laptop and DUT. The dongle decodes the signal and forwards it as serial data from a virtual RS-232 port to the workstation.

Riemersma’s special serial protocol overcomes common challenges of tracing small embedded devices, which typically have limited-performance microcontrollers and scarce interfaces. His system uses a single I/O and keeps it from bottlenecking by sending DUT-to-workstation trace transmissions as compact binary messages. “The trace viewer (or trace “listener”) can translate these message IDs back to the human-readable strings,” he says.

But let’s move on from discussing a single I/0 to a tool that offers hundreds of I/0s. They’re part of the all-programmable Xilinx Zynq SoC, an example of a device that blends a large FPGA fabric with a powerful processing core. Columnist Colin O’Flynn explores using the Zynq SoC as part of the Avnet ZedBoard development board (p. 46). “Xilinx’s Zynq device has many interesting applications,” O’Flynn concludes. “This is made highly accessible by the ZedBoard and MicroZed boards.”

An Avnet ZedBoard is connected to the OpenADC. The OpenADC provides a moderate-speed ADC (105 msps), which interfaces to the programmable logic (PL) fabric in Xilinx’s Zynq device via a parallel data bus. The PL fabric then maps itself as a peripheral on the hard-core processing system (PS) in the Zynq device to stream this data into the system DDR memory.

An Avnet ZedBoard is connected to the OpenADC. (Source: C. O’Flynn, Circuit Cellar 285)

Our embedded programming issue also includes George Novacek’s article on design-level software safety analysis, which helps avert hazards that can damage an embedded controller (p. 39). Bob Japenga discusses specialized file systems essential to Linux and a helpful networking protocol (p. 52).

One of the final steps is mounting the servomotor for rudder control. Thin cords connect the servomotor horn and the rudder. Two metal springs balance mechanical tolerances.

Jens Altenburg’s project

Other issue highlights include projects that are fun as well as instructive. For example, Jens Altenburg added an MCU, GPS, flight simulation, sensors, and more to a compass-controlled glider design he found in a 1930s paperback (p. 32). Columnist Jeff Bachiochi introduces the possibilities of programmable RGB LED strips (p. 66).