Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your IoT Technology Focus newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(2/26) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (3/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (3/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

March Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The March issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is out next week!. We’ve rounded up an outstanding selection of in-depth embedded electronics articles just for you, and rustled them all into our 84-page magazine.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of March 2019 Circuit Cellar:

POWER MAKES IT POSSIBLE

Power Issues for Wearables
Wearable devices put extreme demands on the embedded electronics that make them work—and power is front and center among those demands. Devices spanning across the consumer, fitness and medical markets all need an advanced power source and power management technologies to perform as expected. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child examines how today’s microcontroller and power electronics are enabling today’s wearable products.

Power Supplies for Medical Systems
Over the past year, there’s been an increasing trend toward new products that have some sort of application or industry focus. That means supplies that include either certifications, special performance specs or tailored packaging intended for a specific application area such as medical. This Product Focus section updates readers on these technology trends and provides a product gallery of representative medical-focused power supplies.

DESIGN RESOURCES, ISSUES AND CHALLENGES

Flex PCB Design Services
While not exactly a brand-new technology, flexible printed circuit boards are a critical part of many of today’s challenging embedded system applications from wearable devices to mobile healthcare electronics. Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, explores the Flex PCB design capabilities available today and whose providing them.

Design Flow Ensures Automotive Safety
Fault analysis has been around for years, and many methods have been created to optimize evaluation of hundreds of concurrent faults in specialized simulators. However, there are many challenges in running a fault campaign. Mentor’s Doug Smith presents an improved formal verification flow that reduces the number of faults while simultaneously providing much higher quality of results.

Cooling Electronic Systems
Any good embedded system engineer knows that heat is the enemy of reliability. As new systems cram more functionality at higher speeds into ever smaller packages, it’s no wonder an increasing amount of engineering mindshare is focusing on cooling electronic systems. In this article, George Novacek reviews some of the essential math and science around cooling and looks are several cooling technologies—from cold pates to heat pipes.

MICROCONTROLLER PROJECTS WITH ALL THE DETAILS

MCU-Based Solution Links USB to Legacy PC I/O
In PCs, serial interfaces have now been just about completely replaced by USB. But many of those interfaces are still used in control and monitoring embedded systems. In this project article, Hossam Abdelbaki describes his ATSTAMP design. ATSTAMP is an MCS-51 (8051) compatible microcontroller chip that can be connected to the USB port of any PC via any USB-to-serial bridge currently available in the market.

Pet Collar Uses GPS and Wi-Fi
The PIC32 has proven effective for a myriad of applications, so why not a dog collar? Learn how Cornell graduates Vidya Ramesh and Vaidehi Garg built a GPS-enabled pet collar prototype. The article discusses the hardware peripherals used in the project, the setup, and the software. It also describes the motivation behind the project, and possibilities to expand the project in the future.

Guitar Video Game Uses PIC32
While music-playing video games are fun, their user interfaces tend leave a lot to be desired. Learn how Cornell students Jake Podell and Jonah Wexler designed and built a musical video game that’s interfaced with using a custom-built wireless guitar controller. The game is run on a Microchip PIC32 MCU and uses a TFT LCD display to show notes that move across the screen towards a strum region.

… AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Non-Evasive Current Sensor
Gone are the days when you could do most of your own maintenance on your car’s engine. Today they’re sophisticated electronic systems. But there are some things you can do with the right tools. In his article, By Jeff Bachiochi talks about how using the timing light on his car engine introduced him to non-contact sensor technology. He talks about the types of probes available and how to use them to read the magnitude of alternating current (AC

Impedance Spectroscopy using the AD5933
Impedance spectroscopy is the measurement of a device’s impedance (or resistance) over a range of frequencies. Brian Millier has designed many voltammographs and conductivity meters over the years. But he recently came across the Analog Devices AD5933 chip made by which performs most all the functions needed to do impedance spectroscopy. In this article, explores the technology, circuit design and software that serve these efforts.

Side-Channel Power Analysis
Side-channel power analysis is a method of breaking security on embedded systems, and something Colin O’Flynn has covered extensively in his column. This time Colin shows how you can prove some of the fundamental assumptions that underpin side-channel power analysis. He uses the open-source ChipWhisperer project with Jupyter notebooks for easy interactive evaluation.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(2/26) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (3/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Open-Spec, i.MX6 UL-Based SBC Boasts DAQ and Wireless Features

By Eric Brown

Technologic Systems has announced an engineering sampling program for a wireless- and data acquisition focused SBC with open specifications that runs Debian Linux on NXP’s low-power i.MX6 UL SoC. The -40°C to 85°C tolerant TS-7180 is designed for industrial applications such as industrial control automation and remote monitoring management, including unmanned control room, industrial automation, automatic asset management and asset tracking.


 
TS-7180, front and back
(click images to enlarge)
Like Technologic’s i.MX6-based TS-7970, the TS-7180 has a 122 mm x 112 mm footprint. Like its 119 x 94mm TS-7553-V2 SBC and sandwich-style, 75 mm x 55 mm TS-4100, it features the low power Cortex-A7 based i.MX6 UL, enabling the board to run at a typical 0.91 W.

Like the TS-4100, the new SBC includes an FPGA. On the TS-4100 this was described as a Lattice MachX02 FPGA with an open source, programmable ZPU soft core for controlling GPIO, SPI, I2C and daughtercards. Here, the manual mentions only that the unnamed FPGA enables the optional, 3x 16-bit wide quadrature counters, which are accessible via I2C registers. The “quadrature and edge-counter inputs provide access to” dual, optional tachometers, says Technologic.


 
TS-7180 (left) and block diagram
(click images to enlarge)
The quadrature counters and tachometers are part of a DAQ subsystem with screw terminal interfaces that is not available on its other i.MX6 UL boards. The digital acquisition features also include analog and digital inputs, DIO, and PWM.

Technologic boards typically have a lot of wireless options, but the TS-7180 goes even further by adding a cellular modem socket that supports either MultiTech or NimbeLink wireless modules. You also get Wi-Fi/BT, optional GPS, and a socket for Digi’s XBee modules, which include modems for RF, 802.15.4, DigiMesh, and more. There are also dual 10/100 Ethernet port with an optional Power-over-Ethernet daughtercard.


 
TS-7180 with cellular socket populated with NimbeLink wireless module (left) and with populated XBee socket
(click images to enlarge)
The TS-7180 ships with up to 1 GB RAM and 2 KB FRAM (Cypress 16 kbit FM25L16B), which “provides reliable data retention while eliminating the complexities, overhead, and system level reliability problems caused by EEPROM and other nonvolatile memories,” says Technologic. You also get a microSD slot and 4GB eMMC, which is “configurable as 2 GB pSLC mode for additional system integrity.”

The SBC provides a USB 2.0 host port, as well as micro-USB OTG and serial console ports. There’a also mention of a “coming soon” internal USB interface. Five serial interfaces, including TTL and RS485 ports, are available on screw terminals along with a CAN port.

Other features include an RTC and an optional enclosure and 9-axis IMU. The board runs on an 8-30V input with optional external power supply and Technologic’s TS-SILO SuperCap for 30 seconds of battery backup.

As usual, the board is backed up with open schematics and comprehensive documentation. If it wasn’t over our $200 limit, it would be included in our new catalog of 122 open-spec hacker boards. Two SKUs are available: a basic $315 model with 512MB RAM and a $381 model with 1GB RAM that adds GPS and IMU.

Specifications listed for the TS-7180 include:

  • Processor — NXP i.MX6UL (1x Cortex-A7 core @ up to 696MHz); FPGA
  • Memory/storage:
    • 512MB or 1GB DDR3 RAM
    • 2KB FRAM
    • 4GB MLC eMMC; opt. standard eMMC up to 64GB (special request)
    • MicroSD slot
  • Wireless:
    • 802.11b/g/n with antenna
    • Bluetooth 4.0 BLE
    • Cell modem socket (MultiTech or NimbeLink)
    • Optional GPS
    • XBee interface
  • Networking – 2x 10/100 Ethernet ports with optional PoE via daughtercard
  • Other I/O:
    • USB 2.0 host port
    • Micro-USB OTG port
    • Micro-USB serial console device port
    • 4x serial (1x TTL UART, 3x RS-232) via screw terminals
    • RS-485 (via screw terminal)
    • CAN (via screw terminal)
    • SPI, I2C headers
  • DAQ I/O:
    • 7x DIO (30 VDC tolerant) via screw terminal
    • 4x analog inputs (10V or 4-20 mA) via screw terminal
    • 4x digital inputs via screw terminal
    • PWM header
    • 2x optional quadrature counters
    • 2x Optional tachometers
  • Other features — battery backed RTC; temp. sensor; optional 9-axis accelerometer/gyro; TS-SILO Super Capacitor; optional enclosure
  • Power — 8-30 DC input; 0.91W typical consumption (0.59 min to 6.37 max); optional 24V external DIN-rail mountable “PS-MDR-20-24” power supply
  • Operating temperature — -40 to 85°C
  • Dimensions — 122 x 112mm
  • Operating system — Linux 4.1.15 kernel with Debian image

Further information

The TS-7180 is available in an engineering sampling program for $315 with 512 MB RAM or $381 model with 1GB RAM, GPS, and IMU. 100-unit pricing is $254 and $320. More information may be found in Technologic’s TS-7180 announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on January 4.

Technologic Systems | www.embeddedarm.com

 

Raspberry Pi DAQ HAT Can Stack Eight High

By Eric Brown

In August, Measurement Computing Corp. (MCC) launched its MCC 118 voltage measurement DAQ HAT for the Raspberry Pi with eight ±10 V inputs and sample rates up to 100 kS/s. It has now released a promised MCC 152 voltage output and digital I/O HAT that can be stacked along with the MCC 118 and future MCC HATs in configurations of up to eight boards.

 
MCC 152 with Raspberry Pi (left) and stacked with other MCC 152 boards
(click images to enlarge)
The $99 MCC 152 is equipped with two 12-bit, 0-5 V analog outputs with update rates up to 5 kS/s. There are also 8x bidirectional digital I/O lines with 3.3 V and 5 V support that can be “configured as input or output on a bit by bit basis,” says MCC. Each output bit can source 10 mA and sink 25 mA, and can be individually disabled.

Screw terminal connections are available for all I/O, and power is provided via the Raspberry Pi’s 40-pin GPIO connector. The 65 mm × 56.5 mm × 12mm HAT supports 0 to 55°C temperatures.

HAT configuration parameters are stored in an on-board EEPROM so you can set up the GPIO pins via the Pi when the HAT is connected. When stacking boards, onboard jumpers identify each board in the stack.



MCC 152 block diagram
(click image to enlarge)
MCC provides an open-source MCC DAQ HAT Library in C/C++ and Python hosted on GitHub. The library includes console-based example programs with descriptions and lists of demonstrated functions. A MCC DAQ HAT Manager utility program offers an MCC 152 App to verify functionality. The utility requires the Raspbian desktop interface. API and hardware documentation are also provided.

Further information

The MCC 152 HAT is available for $99. More information may be found at the MCC 152 announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on January 10.

Measurement Computing | www.mccdaq.com

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox on Tuesday: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including ADCs, DACs, DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Analog & Power newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (2/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(2/26) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Next Newsletter: ICs for Consumer Electronics

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s ICs for Consumer Electronics newsletter. Today’;s consumer electronic product designs demand ICs that enable low-power, high-functionality and cutthroat costs. Today’s microcontroller, analog IC and power chip vendors are laser-focused on this lucrative, high-stakes market. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in for consumer electronics ICs.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your
ICs for Consumer Electronics newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. (2/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (2/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Mini-ITX SBC Sports AMD Ryzen APU SoC

WIN Enterprises has announced the MB-73480 which supports the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 processor family. The AMD processors combine the performance of the AMD “Zen” CPU and “Vega” GPU architectures in an integrated SoC solution. In addition, the AMD Ryzen processors deliver discrete-GPU caliber graphics and multimedia processing. Compute performance clocks to 3.61 TFLOPS with thermal design power (TDP) as low as 12 W and as high as 54 W.

The advanced AMD Ryzen CPUs and its other features make the MB-73480 well suited for applications requiring high performance graphics and advanced processing power. Applications include: gaming machines, digital signage, medical imaging, industrial control/automation, thin client, office automation and communication infrastructure. WIN Enterprises will customize the PL-81280 based on a customer’s more specific market needs.

MB-73480 Features:

  • AMD embedded components ensure long product life
  • AMD V1000 Socket FP5 BGA Type CPU mounted onboard (Zen Core-4/8 cores with 2 MB L2 Cache) drawing up to 54 W
  • Supports 4x Independent Displays with 4x DP++ Output
  • AMD Radeon™ Vega core, up to 11 Compute Units
  • Dual DDR4 SO-DIMM Socket and supports from DDR4 1333~3200 SO-DIMM (ECC or non-ECC)
  • 2x RJ45 Port with 10/100/1000 Mbps Transfer speed (Intel I211AT)
  • 5x USB 3.0, 1x USB 2.0, 5x COM, 1x CFast Card, 1x M.2 2280 Socket (B+M key),1x Audio-Jack
  • 2x SATA III Ports with 5 V Power; supports 2x 8G UMLC SATA DOM
  • TPM 2.0
  • 0°C to +60°C operating temperature

WIN Enterprises | www.win-ent.com

 

Next Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content focuses on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your
Embedded Boards newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

January has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
ICs for Consumer Electronics (1/28)  Today’;s consumer electronic product designs demand ICs that enable low-power, high-functionality and cutthroat costs. Today’;s microcontroller, analog IC and power chip vendors are laser-focused on this lucrative, high-stakes market. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in for consumer electronics ICs.

Analog & Power. (2/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (2/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (2/19) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Mini PCIe Expansion Card Boasts PCIe/104 OneBank Interface

WinSystems has introduced its PX1-I416 module, which adds Mini PCI Express expansion capability to embedded systems with PCle/104 OneBank expansion. This product is designed to maximize utilization of a host platform while opening up access to myriad COTS I/O modules from a multitude of suppliers. According the company, system designers can add multiple Mini-Card I/O modules to single board computers like WinSystems’ PX1-C415 without the time, costs or risks of developing proprietary designs.

Compatible with PCle/104 OneBank SBCs, the module incorporates dual Mini-PCI Express slots. Up to four PX1-I416 modules can be stacked together, thereby providing support for up to eight separate Mini-Cards. The onboard PCle and USB multiplexer ensures maximum utilization of the host platform’s PCI Express and USB resources on the OneBank expansion interface. Each PX1-I416 expansion module also includes a separate SIM card holder for use with cellular modems.

The PX1-I416 enables product developers to readily include such functionality as additional USB ports, CAN, and other data acquisition modules, saving time and money. Equally important, these modules are built for enduring, consistent performance at operating temperatures of -40ºC to +85ºC.

WinSystems | www.winsystems.com

February Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The February issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. We’ve raised up a bumper crop of in-depth embedded electronics articles just for you, and packed ’em into our 84-page magazine.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of February 2019 Circuit Cellar:

MCUs ARE EVERYWHERE, DOING EVERYTHING

Electronics for Automotive Infotainment
As automotive dashboard displays get more sophisticated, information and entertainment are merging into so-called infotainment systems. That’s driving a need for powerful MCU- and MPU-based solutions that support the connectivity, computing and interfacing needs particular to these system designs. In this article, Circuit Cellar’s Editor-in-Chief, Jeff Child, looks at the technology and trends feuling automotive infotainment.

Inductive Sensing with PSoC MCUs
Inductive sensing is shaping up to be the next big thing for touch technology. It’s suited for applications involving metal-over-touch situations in automotive, industrial and other similar systems. In his article, Nishant Mittal explores the science and technology of inductive sensing. He then describes a complete system design, along with firmware, for an inductive sensing solution based on Cypress Semiconductor’s PSoC microcontroller.

Build a Self-Correcting LED Clock
In North America, most radio-controlled clocks use WWVB’s transmissions to set the correct time. WWVB is a Colorado-based time signal radio station near. Learn how Cornell graduates Eldar Slobodyan and Jason Ben Nathan designed and built a prototype of a Digital WWVB Clock. The project’s main components include a Microchip PIC32 MCU, an external oscillator and a display.

WE’VE GOT THE POWER

Product Focus: ADCs and DACs
Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and digital-to-analog converters (DACs) are two of the key IC components that enable digital systems to interact with the real world. Makers of analog ICs are constantly evolving their DAC and ADC chips pushing the barriers of resolution and speeds. This new Product Focus section updates readers on this technology and provides a product album of representative ADC and DAC products.

Building a Generator Control System
Three phase electrical power is a critical technology for heavy machinery. Learn how US Coast Guard Academy students Kent Altobelli and Caleb Stewart built a physical generator set model capable of producing three phase electricity. The article steps through the power sensors, master controller and DC-DC conversion design choices they faced with this project.

EMBEDDED COMPUTING FOR YOUR SYSTEM DESIGN

Non-Standard Single Board Computers
Although standard-form factor embedded computers provide a lot of value, many applications demand that form take priority over function. That’s where non-standard boards shine. The majority of non-standard boards tend to be extremely compact, and well suited for size-constrained system designs. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest technology trends and product developments in non-standard SBCs.

Thermal Management in machine learning
Artificial intelligence and machine learning continue to move toward center stage. But the powerful processing they require is tied to high power dissipation that results in a lot of heat to manage. In his article, Tom Gregory from 6SigmaET explores the alternatives available today with a special look at cooling Google’s Tensor Processor Unit 3.0 (TPUv3) which was designed with machine learning in mind.

… AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS

Bluetooth Mesh (Part 1)
Wireless mesh networks are being widely deployed in a wide variety of settings. In this article, Bob Japenga begins his series on Bluetooth mesh. He starts with defining what a mesh network is, then looks at two alternatives available to you as embedded systems designers.

Implementing Time Technology
Many embedded systems need to make use of synchronized time information. In this article, Jeff Bachiochi explores the history of time measurement and how it’s led to NTP and other modern technologies for coordinating universal date and time. Using Arduino and the Espressif System’s ESP32, Jeff then goes through the steps needed to enable your embedded system to request, retrieve and display the synchronized date and time to a display.

Infrared Sensors
Infrared sensing technology has broad application ranging from motion detection in security systems to proximity switches in consumer devices. In this article, George Novacek looks at the science, technology and circuitry of infrared sensors. He also discusses the various types of infrared sensing technologies and how to use them.

The Art of Voltage Probing
Using the right tool for the right job is a basic tenant of electronics engineering. In this article, Robert Lacoste explores one of the most common tools on an engineer’s bench: oscilloscope probes, and in particular the voltage measurement probe. He looks and the different types of voltage probes as well as the techniques to use them effectively and safely.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your IoT Technology Focus newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(1/22) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

January has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
ICs for Consumer Electronics (1/28)  Today’;s consumer electronic product designs demand ICs that enable low-power, high-functionality and cutthroat costs. Today’;s microcontroller, analog IC and power chip vendors are laser-focused on this lucrative, high-stakes market. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in for consumer electronics ICs

Analog & Power. (2/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (2/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

3.5-inch SBC Features Intel Coffee Lake Chips

By Eric Brown

In August, Commell launched the LV-67X, one of the first industrial Mini-ITX boards with Intel’s 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” CPUs. Now, it has followed up with a Coffee Lake based 3.5-inch LS-37L board. The SBC has the same FCLGA1151 socket, supporting up to 6-core, 65W TDP Coffee Lake S-series processors such as the 3.1GHz/4.3GHz Core i5-8600.

Commell lists only Windows drivers on the product page, but the user manual notes support for Linux. The company also recently announced a Coffee Lake based, PICMG 1.3 form factor FS-A79 board.

 
LS-37L and block diagram
(click images to enlarge)
The only other 3.5-inch (146 x 101mm) Coffee Lake board we’ve seen is Avalue’s ECM-CFS. Like that board, the LS-37L has a 0 to 60°C range and supports up to 16GB DDR4 (2666MHz). Other features are very close, with the main difference being the LS-37L’s wide-range 9-25V supply in place of a standard 12V input. The LS-37L also offers more USB and serial headers and adds a PS/2 interface, an RTC with battery, an LCD inverter, and a SIM slot. However, it lacks the Avalue board’s ACPI power management and optional TPM.

Like the ECM-CFS, Commell’s board features triple display support, but instead of dual HDMI ports plus LVDS you get a choice of two configurations. The standard LS-37L model supplies an HDMI port, a DisplayPort, and internal DVI, VGA, and LVDS interfaces. The LS-37LT SKU replaces the DisplayPort with a second VGA or LVDS header.


 
LS-37L detail views
(click images to enlarge)
The LS-37L is equipped with 2x GbE, 2x SATA III, 4x USB 3.1, and a single RS-232 COM port. Internal I/O includes 3x RS232/422/485, 2x RS-232, and GPIO. Like the Avalue SBC, Commell’s board provides a mini-PCIe slot with mSATA support. Yet, the slot also supports other mini-PCIe cards, and there’s a SIM slot for wireless.

Specifications listed for the LS-37L include:

  • Processor — Intel 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” Core, Celeron, and Pentium CPUs up to 65W (FCLGA1151 socket); Intel HD Graphics Gen9 and Intel Q370 chipset
  • Memory — Up to 16GB DDR4 (2666MHz) via 1x SODIMM
  • Storage — 2x SATA 3.0; mSATA via mini-PCIe
  • Display/media:
    • HDMI port
    • DisplayPort (LS-37L) or second VGA or LVDS header (LS-37LT)
    • LVDS, VGA, and DVI headers
    • LCD inverter
    • Triple-display support
    • Audio mic-in/line-in and line-out jacks (Realtek ALC262)
  • Networking — 2x Gigabit Ethernet ports (Intel I211AT and 1219LM); LM port supports iAMT 12.0
  • Other I/O:
    • 4x USB 3.1 ports Gen 2
    • 4x USB 2.0 headers
    • 4x RS-232 (includes 1x COM port)
    • 2x RS232/422/485 headers
    • GPIO
    • SMBus, PS/2
  • Expansion — Mini-PCIe slot (mSATA/PCIe); SIM slot
  • Other features — Watchdog; RTC with battery
  • Power — 9-25V DC input
  • Operating temperatures — 0 to 60°C
  • Dimensions — 146 x 101mm (“3.5-inch form factor”)
  • Operating system — Windows 10 drivers; supports Linux

Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the LS-37L SBC. More information may be found in Commell’s LS-37L announcement and product page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on December 6.

Commell | www.commell.com.tw

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (1/15) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(1/22) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

January has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
ICs for Consumer Electronics (1/28)  Today’;s consumer electronic product designs demand ICs that enable low-power, high-functionality and cutthroat costs. Today’;s microcontroller, analog IC and power chip vendors are laser-focused on this lucrative, high-stakes market. This newsletter looks at the latest technology trends and product developments in for consumer electronics ICs.

Analog & Power. (2/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Catalog of 122 Open-Spec Linux Hacker Boards

Circuit Cellar’s sister website Linuxgizmos,com has posted its 2019 New Year’s edition catalog of hacker-friendly, open-spec SBCs that run Linux or Android. The catalog provides recently updated descriptions, specs, pricing, and links to details for all 122 SBCs.

CHECK IT OUT HERE!