A Year in the Drone Age

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

When you’re trying to keep tabs on any young, fast-growing technology, it’s tempting to say “this is the big year” for that technology. Problem is that odds are the following year could be just as significant. Such is the case with commercial drones. Drone technology fascinates me partly because it represents one of the clearest examples of an application that wouldn’t exist without today’s level of chip integration driven by Moore’s law. That integration has enabled 4k HD video capture, image stabilization, new levels of autonomy and even highly compact supercomputing to fly aboard today’s commercial and consumer drones.

Beyond the technology side, drones make for a rich topic of discussion because of the many safety, privacy and regulatory issues surrounding them. And then there are the wide-open questions on what new applications will drones be used for?

For its part, the Federal Aviation Administration has had its hands full this year regarding drones. In the spring, for example, the FAA completed its fifth and final field evaluation of potential drone detection systems at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. The evaluation was the latest in a series of detection system evaluations that began in February 2016 at several airports. For the DFW test, the FAA teamed with Gryphon Sensors as its industry partner. The company’s drone detection technologies include radar, radio frequency and electro-optical systems. The FAA intends to use the information gathered during these kinds of evaluations to craft performance standards for any drone detection technology that may be deployed in or around U.S. airports.

In early summer, the FAA set up a new Aviation Rulemaking Committee tasked to help the agency create standards for remotely identifying and tracking unmanned aircraft during operations. The rulemaking committee will examine what technology is available or needs to be created to identify and track unmanned aircraft in flight.

This year as also saw vivid examples of the transformative role drones are playing. A perfect example was the role drones played in August during the flooding in Texas after Hurricane Harvey. In his keynote speech at this year’s InterDrone show, FAA Administrator Michael Huerta described how drones made an incredible impact. “After the floodwaters had inundated homes, businesses, roadways and industries, a wide variety of agencies sought FAA authorization to fly drones in airspace covered by Temporary Flight Restrictions,” said Huerta. “We recognized that we needed to move fast—faster than we have ever moved before. In most cases, we were able to approve individual operations within minutes of receiving a request.”

Huerta went on to described some of the ways drones were used. A railroad company used drones to survey damage to a rail line that cuts through Houston. Oil and energy companies flew drones to spot damage to their flooded infrastructure. Drones helped a fire department and county emergency management officials check for damage to roads, bridges, underpasses and water treatment plants that could require immediate repair. Meanwhile, cell tower companies flew them to assess damage to their towers and associated ground equipment and insurance companies began assessing damage to neighborhoods. In many of those situations, drones were able to conduct low-level operations more efficiently—and more safely—than could have been done with manned aircraft.

“I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that the hurricane response will be looked back upon as a landmark in the evolution of drone usage in this country,” said Huerta. “And I believe the drone industry itself deserves a lot of credit for enabling this to happen. That’s because the pace of innovation in the drone industry is like nothing we have seen before. If people can dream up a new use for drones, they’re transforming it into reality.”

Clearly, it’s been significant year for drone technology. And I’m excited for Circuit Cellar to go deeper with our drone embedded technology coverage in 2018. But I don’t think I’ll dare say that “this was the big year” for drones. I have a feeling it’s just one of many to come.

This appears in the December (329) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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Next Newsletter: IoT Technology Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(11/28) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (12/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (12/12) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

LX2160AAlready a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (11/21) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(11/28) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (12/5) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. (11/14) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (11/21) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(11/28) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Bonus Newsletter Tomorrow: PCB Design

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: October has a 5th Tuesday . That’s means there’s an extra Newsletter this month! The bonus topic is PCB Design. The process of PCB design is always facing new complexities. Rules-based autorouting, chips with higher lead counts and higher speed interconnections are just a few of the challenges forcing PCB design software to keep pace. This newsletter updates you on the latest happenings in this area.

Also, we’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

combo-PCB-FlexAlready a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. (11/7) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch. (11/14) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (11/21) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. (11/28) This newsletter content focuses on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Hop on the Moving Train

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

We work pretty far in advance to get Circuit Cellar produced and in your hands on-time and at the level of quality you expect and deserve. Given that timing, as we go to press on this issue we’re getting into the early days of fall. In my 27 years in the technology magazine business, this part of the year has always included time set aside to finalize next year’s editorial calendar. The process for me over years has run the gamut from elaborate multi-day summer meetings to small one-on-one conversations with a handful of staff. But in every case, the purpose has never been only about choosing the monthly section topics. It’s also a deeper and broader discussion about “directions.” By that I mean the direction embedded systems technologies are going in—and how it’s impacting you our readers. Because these technologies change so rapidly, getting a handle on it is a bit like jumping onto a moving train.

A well thought out editorial calendar helps us plan out and select which article topics are most important—for both staff-written and contributed articles. And because we want to include all of the most insightful, in-depth stories we can, we will continue to include a mix of feature articles beyond the monthly calendar topics. Beyond its role for article planning, a magazine’s editorial calendar also makes a statement on what the magazine’s priorities are in terms of technology, application segments and product areas. In our case, it speaks to the kind of magazine that Circuit Cellar is—and what it isn’t.

An awareness of what types of product areas are critical to today’s developers is important. But because Circuit Cellar is not just a generic product magazine, we’re always looking at how various chips, boards and software solutions fit together in a systems context. This applies to our technology trend features as well as our detailed project-based articles that explore a microcontroller-based design in all its interesting detail. On the other hand, Circuit Cellar isn’t an academic style technical journal that’s divorced from any discussion of commercial products. In contrast, we embrace the commercial world enthusiastically. The deluge of new chip, board and software products often help inspire engineers to take a new direction in their system designs. New products serve as key milestones illustrating where technology is trending and at what rate of change.

Part of the discussion—for 2018 especially—is looking at how the definition of a “system” is changing. Driven by Moore’s Law, chip integration has shifted the level of system functionally at the IC, board and box level. We see an FPGA, SoC or microcontroller of today doing what used to require a whole embedded board. In turn, embedded boards can do what once required a box full of slot-card boards. Meanwhile, the high-speed interconnects between those new “system” blocks constantly have to keep those processing elements fed. The new levels of compute density, functionality and networking available today are opening up new options for embedded applications. Highly integrated FPGAs, comprehensive software development tools, high-speed fabric interconnects and turnkey box-level systems are just a few of the players in this story of embedded system evolution.

Finally, one of the most important new realities in embedded design is the emergence of intelligent systems. Using this term in a fairly broad sense, it’s basically now easier than ever to apply high-levels of embedded intelligence into any device or system. In some cases, this means adding a 32-bit MCU to an application that never used such technology. At the other extreme are full supercomputing-level AI technologies installed in a small drone or a vehicle. Such systems can meet immense throughput and processing requirements in space-constrained applications handling huge amounts of real-time incoming data. And at both those extremes, there’s connectivity to cloud-based computing analytics that exemplifies the cutting edge of the IoT. In fact, the IoT phenomenon is so important and opportunity rich that we plan to hit it from a variety of angles in 2018.

Those are the kinds of technology discussions that informed our creation of Circuit Cellar’s 2018 Ed Cal. Available now on www.circuitcellar.com, the structure of the calendar has been expanded for 2018 to ensure we cover all the critical embedded technology topics important to today’s engineering professional. Technology changes rapidly, so we invite you to hop on this moving train and ride along with us.

This appears in the November (328) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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Tuesday’s Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content focuses on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Connect Tech VXG006-AngleAlready a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

October has a 5th Tuesday (10/31) There’s an extra Newsletter this month: PCB Design

Analog & Power. (11/7) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch. (11/14) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (11/21) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

IP65-Rated E3800-Based Panel PCs Feature Fanless Design

Winsystems has released its advanced IP65-rated panel PC delivering high reliability and an extended operating temperature range in a thin, fanless design. The PPC65B series offers a rugged design for extreme environments and industrial IoT applications ranging from -20ºC to +70ºC. Winsystems’ latest industrial PCs accommodate panel and VESA mounting configurations. When mounted properly, the sealed front bezel can be washed down with a pressure hose, making this series ideal for industrial control applications such as food processing and fleet management. The PPC65B series provides a low-profile solution for Human Machine Interface (HMI) and display applications in harsh environments that might otherwise require extensive packaging to protect the embedded computer.

Winsystems ppc65b-1x_a-1000x979These IP65-rated panel PCs, which support Linux and Windows 10 operating systems, use the 1.9 GHz Quad-Core Intel Atom processor and include up to 8 GB of RAM. They deliver fast graphics at high resolutions—1024 X 768 and 1280 x 1024—accessed via a five-wire resistive touchscreen. The rugged design also incorporates a SATA controller with 2.5-inch HDD/SSD and wide input power: 12 VDC to 24 VDC.

Optimal connectivity and I/O for embedded systems is achieved through 2x GbE Ethernet ports, a 1x USB 2.0 port (accommodating up to 3x with expansion) and 1x USB 3.0 port. A watchdog timer is included. The PPC65B series also includes options for expansion with 2x RS-232/422/485 plus 2x USB (default).

Winsystems | www.winsystems.com

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: IoT Technology Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content covers wha’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

everyware_server_M2M_cloudAlready a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your IoT Technology Focus newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(10/24) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

October has a 5th Tuesday (10/31) There’s an extra Newsletter this month: PCB Design

Analog & Power. (11/7) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch. (11/14) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

COM Express Type 7 Card Sports Atom C3000

Congatec has announced the launch of the conga-B7AC, a new Intel Atom C3000 processor based COM Express Type 7 Server-on-Module with 10 GbE support. With a power consumption starting at only 11 W, the board blends the 16-core Atom processor with a four a channel GbE real-time capable network. The feature set is designed for modular industrial micro servers as well as rugged telecom and network equipment, such as small cells, factory gateways and storage systems. It is deployable even in the extended temperature range from -40°C to +85°C.

The conga-B7AC is based on the new PICMG COM Express 3.0 specification. As a standardized building block, it is well suited for efficient custom designs of very small sized, passively cooled embedded edge systems. The new modules are application ready for redundant, real-time communication and virtualization platforms.

conga-B7AC_pressThey are designed to maximize uptime and resilience, minimize latency and to get the most out of each processing core. Their cloud API for distributed embedded edge servers further provides all the capabilities that data center managers need to remotely monitor system health, power consumption and environmental conditions. With the support of up to 20 PCIe lanes, the new Intel Atom C3000 processor based COM Express Type 7 Server-on-Modules also offer minimum latency for storage devices as well as very fast access lanes to all the various sensor networks, field buses and industrial Ethernet links.

The new conga-B7AC COM Express Type 7 Server-on-Modules are available with 8 different Intel Atom server processors, from the 16-core Intel Atom C3958 processor to the quad-core C3508 for the extended temperature range (-40°C to +85°C). All modules provide up to 48 GB of fast 2400 DDR4 memory with or without error correction code (ECC) depending on customers’ requirements. They offer very high network capabilities with up to 4x 10 GbE and the Network Controller Sideband Interface (NC-SI) for connecting a baseboard management controller (BMC) allowing out-of-band remote manageability. Flexible system extensions including NVMe flash storage can be connected via up to 12x PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes and 8x PCIe Gen 2.0 lanes. 2x SATA 6G ports are available for conventional storage media. Further I/O interfaces include 2x USB 3.0, 4x USB 2.0, LPC, SPI, I2C Bus and 2x UART. Additionally, the module hosts a trusted platform module (TPM) for security sensitive network appliances.

Congatec | www.congatec.com

FREE Sample Issue – Oct. 2017

 

We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.

Don’t miss out on upcoming issues of Circuit Cellar. Subscribe today!

Inside This Issue:
Emulating Legacy Interfaces
Do it with Microcontrollers
By Wolfgang Matthes

OctP18
Building a Retro TV Remote
PIC MCU-Based Design
By Dev Gualtieri
Building a Robot Hand
With Servos and Electromyography
By Michael Haidar, Jason Hwang and Srikrishnaa VadivelLogger Device Tracks Amp Hours (Part 1)
Measuring Home Electricity
By William Wachsmann

OctP38
Commercial Drone Design Solutions Take Flight

Chips, Boards and Platforms
By Jeff Child

Design for Manufacturing: Does It Have to be so Difficult?
An interview with Scott N. Miller and Thos Niles
By Wisse Hettinga

Signal Chain Tech Pushes Bandwidth Barriers
ADCs, FPGAs and DACs
By Jeff Child

Embedded in Thin Slices
Build an Embedded Systems Consulting Company (Part 6)
Trade-Offs of Fixed-Price Contracts
By Bob JapengaThe Consummate Engineer
In the Loop on Positive Feedback
New Value in an Old Concept
By George Novacek

OctP56

The Darker Side
Antenna Performance Measurement Made Easy
Covering the Basics
By Robert Lacoste
From the Bench
Gas Monitoring and Sensing (Part 1)
Fun with Fragrant Analysis
By Jeff BachiochiTECH THE FUTURE
The Future of PCB Design

Racing to Keep Pace With PCB Complexities
By Duane Benson

Don’t miss out on upcoming issues of Circuit Cellar. Subscribe today!

Arduino Board Pair Boasts LoRa and GSM Capabilities

Arduino has introduced a pair of new Internet-of-Things (IoT)  boards with embedded LoRa and GSM capabilities. The boards were first unveiled at World Maker Faire New York. The Arduino MKR WAN 1300 and MKR GSM 1400 enable system developers to quickly add connectivity to their projects and ease the development of battery-powered IoT edge applications. Both of the highly compact boards measure just 67.64 mm x 25 mm, together with low power consumption, making them an ideal choice for emerging battery-powered IoT edge devices in the MKR form factor. Suitable applications examples include environmental monitoring, tracking, agriculture, energy monitoring and home automation.

Arduino DKb9irAW4AAM320-1Offering 32-bit computational power similar to the Arduino MKR ZERO board, the MKR WAN 1300 is based around the Murata LoRa low-power connectivity module and the Microchip SAM D21 microcontroller, which integrates an ARM Cortex-M0+ processor, 256 KB Flash memory and 3 2KB SRAM. The board’s design includes the ability to be powered by either two 1.5 V AA or AAA batteries or an external 5 V input via the USB interface—with automatic switching between the two power sources.

In addition, the MKR WAN 1300 offers the usual rich set of I/O interfaces expected with an Arduino board, and ease of use via the Arduino IDE software environment for code development and programming. Other features  include an operating voltage of 3.3 V; eight digital I/Os; 12 PWM outputs; and UART, SPI and I2C interfaces.

Like the MKR WAN 1300, the Arduino MKR GSM 1400 is based on the SAM D21, but integrates a u-blox module for global 3G communications. The board features automatic power switching, however, it uses either a 3.7 V LiPo battery or an external Vin power source delivering 5 V to 12 V. While the USB port can also be used to supply 5 V to the board, the MKR GSM 1400 is able to run with or without the battery connected.

The MKR GSM 1400 provides a rich set of I/O interfaces including: eight digital I/Os; 12 PWM outputs; UART, SPI and I2C interfaces; analog I/O including seven inputs and one output; and eight external interrupt pins. Both boards are now available for pre-order on the Arduino Store.

Arduino | www.arduino.cc

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch themed newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers themselves along with their associated tools and support products.20150220-rh850-d1x

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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You’ll get your “Microcontroller” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries and more.

…and…

October has a 5th Tuesday. So look for a bonus Newsletter this  month!

COM Express Solution Serves up NVIDIA GPUs

Connect Tech now offers NVIDIA Quadro and Tesla GPUs on its COM Express + GPU Embedded Platform. The platform combines Intel processors with NVIDIA GPUs into a ruggedized small form factor embedded system. This is an ideal platform to enable deployable multi-Teraflop CUDA solutions in a small rugged solution.

Connect Tech VXG006-AngleThis embedded system exposes all of the latest generation interconnect including: Gbit Ethernet, USB 3.0 and 2.0, DisplayPort++, VGA, LVDS, SATA III, GPIO, I2C, mSATA, miniPCIe, PCIe/104 and SD Card Expansion. The system uses all locking ruggedized positive latching connectors. It eases the challenge of cooling multiple processors with the use of the company’s Unified Thermal Extraction Baseplate that can be mounted directly into an enclosure or chassis for further thermal dissipation.

The COM Express + GPU Embedded System from Connect Tech combines Intel Skylake and Kaby Lake x86 processors with high-end NVIDIA GPUs. Users can choose from highest-end, highest-performance models or from low-powered extended temperature models all ideal for high-end encode/decode video applications or GPGPU CUDA processing applications.

Connect Tech | www.connecttech.com

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Analog & Power

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power themed newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries and more.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.Power-on-Package-Enable

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “Analog & Power” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.