LED Characterization: An Arduino-Based Curve Tracer

Circuit Cellar columnist Ed Nisley doesn’t want to rely solely on datasheets to understand the values of LEDs in his collection. So he built a curve tracer to measure his LEDs’ specific characteristics.

Why was he so exacting?

“Most of the time, we take small light-emitting diodes for granted: connect one in series with a suitable resistor and voltage source, it lights up, then we expect it to work forever,” he says in his July column in Circuit Cellar. “A recent project prompted me to take a closer look at commodity 5-mm LEDs, because I intended to connect them in series for better efficiency from a fixed DC supply and in parallel to simplify the switching. Rather than depend on the values found in datasheets, I built a simple Arduino-based LED Curve Tracer to measure the actual characteristics of the LEDs I intended to use.”

The Arduino Pro Micro clone in this hand-wired LED Curve Tracer controls the LED current and measures the resulting voltage.

Ed decided to share the curve tracer with his Circuit Cellar readers.

“Even though this isn’t a research-grade instrument, it can provide useful data that helps demonstrate LED operation and shows why you must pay more attention to their needs,” he says.

Ed says that although he thinks of his circuit as an “LED Curve Tracer,” it doesn’t display its data.

“Instead, I create the graphs with data files captured from the Arduino serial port and processed through Gnuplot,” he says. “One advantage of that process is that I can tailor the graphs to suit the data, rather than depend on a single graphic format. One disadvantage is that I must run a program to visualize the measurements. Feel free to add a graphics display to your LED Curve Tracer and write the code to support it!”

He adds that “any circuit attached to an Arduino should provide its own power to avoid overloading the Arduino’s on-board regulator.”

“I used a regulated 7.5 VDC wall wart for both the Arduino Pro Mini board and the LED under test, because the relatively low voltage minimized the power dissipation in the Arduino regulator,” he says. “You could use a 9 VDC or 12 VDC supply.”

To read more about Ed’s curve tracer, check out Circuit Cellar’s July issue.

 

RFI Bypasssing

With GPS technology and audio radio interfaces on his personal fleet of bikes, Circuit Cellar columnist Ed Nisley’s family can communicate to each other while sending GPS location data via an automatic packet reporting system (APRS) network. In his February 2012 article, Ed describes a project for which he used a KG-UV3D radio interface rigged with SMD capacitors to suppress RF energy. He covers topics such as test-fixture measurements on isolated capacitors and bypassing beyond VHF.

Photo 2 from the Febuary article, "RFI Bypassing (Part 1)." A pair of axial-lead resistors isolate the tracking generator and spectrum analyzer from the components under test. The 47-Ω SMD resistor, standing upright just to the right of the resistor lead junction, forms an almost perfect terminator. (Source: Ed Nisley CC259)

Ed writes:

Repeatable and dependable measurements require a solid test fixture. Although the collection of parts in Photo 2 may look like a kludge, it’s an exemplar of the “ugly construction” technique that’s actually a good way to build RF circuits. “Some Thoughts on Breadboarding,” by Wes Hayword, W7ZOI, gives details and suggestions for constructing RF projects above a solid printed circuit board (PCB) ground plane.

You can read this article now in Circuit Cellar 259. If you aren’t a subscriber, you can purchase a copy of the issue here.