ALTspace – Cubes, Shame and Art

ALTSpace is a Community Art Workshop in Seattle. Creative people of all kinds share this spacious workshop, teaching, experimenting, making and learning. Members can spend time bouncing ideas off one another, hold or attend classes, work away from home and have the space to get even large projects done.

Location 2318 E. Cherry Street, Seattle, WA
Members 37
Website airlighttimespace.org

ALTspace hackerspace, Seattle

Co-founder Mike tells us about his space:
Tell us about your meeting space!

We have a total of about 2800 sq ft. We have two garage spaces for industrial machines, loud and dirty operations. (about 700 sq ft total) The rest of the space is for personal workspaces and public areas for working, meeting, hanging out. We have 2 showers, 2 bathrooms, a kitchen, a laundry room and an outdoor patio.

What tools do you have in your space? (Soldering stations? Oscilloscopes? 3-D printers?)

Full list of ALTspace’s tools & equipment.

Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

A laser cutter would be our next purchase.

Does your group work with embedded tech (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, MCU-based designs, etc.)?

Yes, we do quite a bit of electronics. One of our more well known projects, the Groovik’s Cube (A 30ft playable Rubik’s Cube) is an arduino driven project.

Can you tell us about some of your group’s recent tech projects?

Groovik’s Cube:

ALTspace's Groovik's CubeWe first built the cube as an art project for Burning Man 2009 and we’ve since been working hard to try and bring this project to the general public. We’ve been collaborating with the Science Center since summer ’10 and we’ve been doing a number of refurbishments including a brand new light-weight aluminum structure to create a neater look suitable for an indoor museum environment.

Groovik’s cube is a fully playable, LED driven Rubik’s cube, hung from the ceiling, corner down. (the motion is of course simulated, not mechanical, i.e. the colors move around, not the structure itself). It can be played and solved by the visitors. A particularly interesting feature is that we have split the controls into 3 stations placed around the cube, each allowing only one axis of rotation. This means 3 people have to collaborate together to solve it. The stations are ~30-50 ft apart from each other. This makes the puzzle considerably harder with a current record solution time of 50 minutes (achieved on Friday night @ Burning Man 09). It also turns a very introverted game into a collaborative challenge which is fun to watch. Imagine people shouting instructions to each other and running around checking on the state of the cube from different angles.

Temple of Shame:

ALTspace's Temple of Shame

by Alissa Mortenson, Nebunele Theatre, The Temple of Shame was a 6ft wide, 18ft tall wooden Temple dedicated to the collection of shame from the participants of Black Rock City. The temple was ceremonially burned on the last night of the festival to symbolically release all the shame collected.

From shameproject.org: “The experience of shame is part of our shared humanity, yet paradoxically, the times when we are ashamed are the times when we feel most alone. But within shame lies a capacity for human connection. The Shame Bearers seek to explore this emotion as a powerful medium for reaching a state of shared vulnerability. In order to make connection –the core human desire– we must believe that we are enough, that we are worthy of love and acceptance. In our vulnerability and our recognition of our mutual imperfections, we can find worthiness and connection. That is the power of this project.”

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

Groovik’s cube for sure.

Do you have any events or initiatives you’d like to tell us about? Where can we learn more about it?

Indeed: http://lsc.org/grooviks. We’re trying to raise funding for a new Groovik’s cube that will travel the World for 7 years together with Liberty Science Center and Erno Rubik!

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Hack more! Not satified with availability of hackerspaces near you ? Start one! It’s easier than you think and people come out of the woodwork to come and help and donate time and tools.

ALTspace’s tools & equipment:

Metal:

  • 2HP Metal Mill & Lathe
  • Lincoln 220 MIG Welder (up to 1/4″ steel)
  • TIG 200Amp DC/AC (i.e. Steel, Aluminum & other non-ferrous)
  • Plasma Torch (Up to 1″ steel or aluminum)
  • Stick Welder
  • Metal Grinding wheels, belt sanders
  • 4×6 Metal Bandsaw
  • Deburring wheel and 2 buffers
  • Wire bender
  • Abrasive metal chop saw

Machine Shop (Wood):

  • 3/4HP Table saw
  • Router table & Hand Router
  • Various Sanders (Orbital & Belt)
  • Miter Chop saw

Other Machine Shop amenities:

  • 90 PSI Compressor
  • 3/4HP 1/2″ Shank Drill press
  • Hand drills, Sander
  • 110V/230V Power (50A)

Glass:

  • Glass fusing/slumping/casting kiln, up to 1600 deg F

Jewelery setup:

  • Small Propane/Oxygen torch for soldering/annealing
  • Flexshaft Rotary grinder
  • Rolling Mill
  • Disc Die Cutter & Hemisphere punch

Electronics benches:

  • Maker bot
  • Soldering station with fume extractor and static pad
  • Multimeter
  • 100 Mhz Oscilloscope (Techronix)
  • Basic tools (snippers, strippers, screwdrivers, etc)
  • Variable voltage / current power supply
  • Stock of common components
  • Anti-static worktop

Sewing Area:

  • Pfaff industrial sewing machine
  • Janome domestic sewing machine
  • Hoseki HK757G is a 5-thread industrial serger
  • White domestic 4-thread serger
  • irons, cork-topped layout table, digitizing table, pattern plotter
  • Janome Computerized domestic sewing machine
  • Rowenta domestic iron
  • Sleeve board
  • Tailor’s ham
  • Pattern Drafting Rulers and curves
  • Costuming books

Read more about ALTspace’s Groovik’s Cube project on indiegogo or on Mike’s website, or about The Shame Project on shameproject.org!

You can read about more of ALTspace’s projects on their art page.

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet at a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

Brooklyn-Based Alpha One Labs

Alpha One Labs is a very active hackerspace located in Brooklyn. They frequently host events and offer many services to their members.

Location 657 Meeker Ave #1L
Brooklyn NY, 11222
Members 25-35
Website AlphaOneLabs.com

Alpha One Labs

Mary Auriti is co-founder and secretary at Alpha One Labs. We ask her what she has to tell us about her space:

What’s your meeting space like?

Approximately 900 sq. ft. with 18 ft. ceilings which could accommodate a second floor. We have a wall of pegboard with tools and custom built shelves with clear containers for supplies as well as small bins for little items. There is eight heavy duty desks, a taller work table and an adjustable height desk/work table. In the front area of our space we have a little lounge area with a small sofa, book shelf, fridge, coffee maker, big flat screen TV, twitter LED scroller, old school video consoles and games, and a gallery wall featuring a local artist’s work.

What tools do you have in your space? (Soldering stations? Oscilloscopes? 3-D printers?)

We have a JCUT 6090 laser cutter, a RepRap, drill press, saws, a Dremel, and other hand tools. Also, oscilloscopes and soldering irons.

If you could add three more tools, what would they be?

Welder, Epilogue laser cutter, and a CNC 5 axis mill

Does your group work with embedded tech (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, MCU-based designs, etc.)?

We use Arduinos and are getting into Raspberry Pi.

Can you tell us about some of your group’s recent tech projects?

We have had a wide range of projects come through our lab as well as the ongoing big project of the physical lab space itself. Some projects from the past four years are:

  • the “Twitmas Tree” (ornaments that light up every time someone tweets a holiday related word)
  • butter churning with kosher cream from bed sty
  • self-watering rooftop veggie garden
  • LED hat displaying preset or dynamic messages
  • Internet time piece
  • and a stair climbing wheelchair — to name few

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

“Shot in the Dark” — A laser pointing to the center of the toilet bowel so men have a target.

Where can the CC Community learn more about it?

We post all our events on our web site alphaonelabs.com and host a few meetups from time to time as people contact us. We like to be there for any group that needs us and shares our interests in the great wide space of making, art, technology, science, education, environmentalism, hacking.

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Come on down! We are open to all and love the diversity of people who come through our lab. We are consistently working on making our lab a place to encourage innovation and give people what they need to get their projects off the ground.

Keep up with Alpha One Labs! Check out their Facebook page or Twitter feed for current events or to get involved.

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet at a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

Free Raspberry Pi Poster

The Raspberry Pi is a computer with no casing, no keyboard, no hard disk and no screen. Despite all that, it’s taking the world by storm!

Get your free Raspberry Pi poster now, courtesy of Elektor, RS Components, and CC! Go ahead: download, print, and then enjoy!

Free Raspberry Pi Poster

RASPBERRY PI ESSENTIALS

Model A has 256-MB RAM, one USB port, and no Ethernet port (network connection). Model B has 512-MB RAM, two USB ports, and an Ethernet port.

The Raspberry Pi Model B, revision 2 board:

  • Status led labels: top led has label “ACT” and bottom led has label “100”
  • Header P2 is not populated
  • The text underneath the Raspberry Pi logo reads: “(C) 2011,12”
  • The area next to the micro usb port has CE and FCC logos and the text “Made in China or UK” along the board edge.
  • There are two 2.9-mm holes in the PCB, which can be used as mounting holes.
  • P5 is a new GPIO header with four additional GPIO pins and four power pins. Also note that some pin and I2C port numbers of connector P1 have been modified between revisions!
  • Header P6 (left from the HDMI port) was added, short these two pins to reset the computer or wake it up when powered down with the “sudo halt” command.

The Raspberry Pi measures 85.60 mm × 56 mm × 21 mm, with a little overlap for the SD card and connectors which project over the edges. It weighs 45 g.

The SoC is a Broadcom BCM2835. This contains an ARM ARM1176JZFS, with floating point, running at 700 MHz, and a Videocore 4 GPU. The GPU is capable of BluRay quality playback, using H.264 at 40 Mbps. It has a fast 3D core which can be accessed using the supplied OpenGL ES2.0 and OpenVG libraries.

The Raspberry Pi is capable of using hardware acceleration for MPEG-2 and VC-1 playback, but you’ll need to buy license keys at the Raspberry Pi Store to unlock this functionality.

Which programming languages can you use? Python, C/C++, Perl, Java, PHP/MySQL, Scratch, and many more that can run under Linux.

TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS

If you’re getting a flashing red PWR LED or random restarts during the booting process, it’s likely that your PSU or USB cable has problems. The Raspberry Pi is pretty picky and requires a solid 5-V/1000-mA power supply. For other issues and more troubleshooting tips check out the extensive overview at the eLinux website

Circuitcellar.com is an Elektor International Media website.

Electrostatic Cleaning Robot Project

How do you clean a clean-energy generating system? With a microcontroller (and a few other parts, of course). An excellent example is US designer Scott Potter’s award-winning, Renesas RL78 microcontroller-based Electrostatic Cleaning Robot system that cleans heliostats (i.e., solar-tracking mirrors) used in solar energy-harvesting systems. Renesas and Circuit Cellar magazine announced this week at DevCon 2012 in Garden Grove, CA, that Potter’s design won First Prize in the RL78 Green Energy Challenge.

This image depicts two Electrostatic Cleaning Robots set up on two heliostats. (Source: S. Potter)

The nearby image depicts two Electrostatic Cleaning Robots set up vertically in order to clean the two heliostats in a horizontal left-to-right (and vice versa) fashion.

The Electrostatic Cleaning Robot in place to clean

Potter’s design can quickly clean heliostats in Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants. The heliostats must be clean in order to maximize steam production, which generates power.

The robot cleaner prototype

Built around an RL78 microcontroller, the Electrostatic Cleaning Robot provides a reliable cleaning solution that’s powered entirely by photovoltaic cells. The robot traverses the surface of the mirror and uses a high-voltage AC electric field to sweep away dust and debris.

Parts and circuitry inside the robot cleaner

Object oriented C++ software, developed with the IAR Embedded Workbench and the RL78 Demonstration Kit, controls the device.

IAR Embedded Workbench IDE

The RL78 microcontroller uses the following for system control:

• 20 Digital I/Os used as system control lines

• 1 ADC monitors solar cell voltage

• 1 Interval timer provides controller time tick

• Timer array unit: 4 timers capture the width of sensor pulses

• Watchdog timer for system reliability

• Low voltage detection for reliable operation in intermittent solar conditions

• RTC used in diagnostic logs

• 1 UART used for diagnostics

• Flash memory for storing diagnostic logs

The complete project (description, schematics, diagrams, and code) is now available on the Challenge website.

 

Member Profile: Thomas Struzik

Member Thomas Struzik at his bench.

 

  • Member Name: Thomas Struzik
  • Location: Houston, TX
  • Education: BSEE, Purdue University
  • Occupation: Software architect
  • Member Status: He has been a subscriber since day one. “I’ve got Issue 1 sitting in a box somewhere,” he said. Thomas adds that he was a BYTE magazine subscriber before Circuit Cellar.
  • Technical Interests: Thomas enjoys automation through embedded technology, robotics, low-level programming, and electronic music generation / enhancement.
  • Most Recent Embedded Tech-Related Purchase: He recently bought a CWAV USBee SX Digital Test Pod and an Atmel AVR Dragon.
  • Current and Recent Projects: Thomas is working on designing an isolated USB power supply for his car.
  • Thoughts on the Future of Embedded Technology: Ever-increasing complexity is becoming a stumbling block for the “average” user. “Few people even realize the technology embedded in everyday items,” he said. “How many people know that brand-new LCD TV they’ve got is actually running Linux under the covers? Fortunately, there seems to be a resurgence of ‘need-to-know how stuff works’ with the whole DIY/maker culture. But even that is still a small island compared to the population in general.”