Cabinet-Based DIY Electronics Workspace

Micrcontrollers and electrical engineering probably don’t come to mind when you flip through an IKEA product catalog. But when you think about it, IKEA has plenty of easy-to-assemble tables, cabinets, and storage containers that could be handy for outfitting a electronics workspace or “circuit cellar.”

(Source: Patrik Thalin)

(Source: Patrik Thalin)

Sweden-based Patrik Thalin built a workspace within an IKEA Husar cabinet. The setup is compact, orderly, and well-planned. He noted:

It has a pull-out keyboard shelf that I use it as an extension of the workspace when the doors are open. My inspiration came from a friend that had built his lab in a two door closet. The main idea is to have a workspace that can be closed when not used and to be able to resume my work later. I have used this lab for nearly ten years and I am still happy with it!

In the upper part of the cabinet I keep commonly used tools and instruments. On the top shelf are two PSUs, a signal generator, assortment boxes with components, the SMD component kit and shelf trays with cables and small tools. On the lower shelves are things like multimeter, callipers and a power drill. At the bottom is the work space with a soldering station. On the left wall are screwdrivers,wrenches and pliers. To the left are cables hanging on hooks.The thing hanging under the shelf is an old radio scanner. You can also see a small vise hanging on the front of the workspace.

The lower part of the cabinet is for additional storage, he noted.

(Source: Patrik Thalin)

(Source: Patrik Thalin)

The information and images were submitted by Patrik Thalin. For more information about his space and work, visit his blog.

DIY Arduino-Based ECG System

Cornell University students Sean Hubber and Crystal Lu built an Arduino-based electrocardiography (ECG) system that enables them to view a heart’s waveform on a mini TV. The basic idea is straightforward: an Arduino Due converts a heartbeat waveform to an NTSC signal.

Here you can see the system in action. The top line (green) has a 1-s time base. The bottom line (yellow) has a 5-s time base. (Source: Hubber & Lu)

Here you can see the system in action. The top line (green) has a 1-s time base. The bottom line (yellow) has a 5-s
time base. (Source: Hubber & Lu)

In their article, “Hands-On Electrocardiography,” Hubber and Lu write:

We used the Arduino Due to convert the heartbeat waveform to an NTSC signal that could be used by a mini-TV. The Arduino Due continuously sampled the input provided by the voltage limiter at 240 sps. Similar to MATLAB, the vectorized signal was shifted left to make room at the end for the most recent sample. This provided a continuous real-time display of the incoming signal. Each frame outputted to the mini-TV contains two waveforms. One has a 1-s screen width and the other has a 5-s screen width. This enables the user to see a standard version (5 s) and a more zoomed in version (1 s). Each frame also contains an integer representing the program’s elapsed time. This code was produced by Cornell University professor Bruce Land.

As you can see in the nearby block diagram, Hubber and Lu’s ECG system comprises a circuit, an Arduino board, a TV display, MATLAB programming language, and a voltage limiter.

The system's block diagram (Circuit Cellar 289, 2014)

The system’s block diagram (Circuit Cellar 289, 2014)

The system’s main circuit is “separated into several stages to ensure that retrieving the signal would be user-safe and that sufficient amplification could be made to produce a readable ECG signal,” Hubber and Lu noted.

The first stage is the conditioning stage, which ensures user safety through DC isolation by initially connecting the dry electrode signals directly to capacitors and resistors. The capacitors help with DC isolation and provide a DC offset correction while the resistors limit the current passing through. This input-conditioning stage is followed by amplification and filtering that yields an output with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). After the circuit block, the signal is used by MATLAB and voltage limiter blocks. Directly after DC isolation, the signal is sent into a Texas Instruments INA116 differential amplifier and, with a 1-kΩ RG value, an initial gain of 51 is obtained. The INA116 has a low bias current, which permits the high-impedance signal source. The differential amplifier also utilizes a feedback loop, which prevents it from saturating.

Following the differentiation stage, the signal is passed through multiple filters and receives additional amplification. The first is a low-pass filter with an approximately 16-Hz cutoff frequency. This filter is primarily used to eliminate 60-Hz noise. The second filter is a high-pass filter with an approximately 0.5-Hz cutoff frequency. This filter is mostly used to eliminate DC offset. The total amplification at this stage is 10. Since the noise was significantly reduced and the SNR was large, this amplification produced a very strong and clear signal. With these stages done, the signal was then strong enough to be digitally analyzed. The signal could then travel to both the MATLAB and voltage limiter blocks.

Hubber and Lu’s article was published in Circuit Cellar 289, 2014. Get it now!

Arduino-Based Lathe Tachometer

Want an electronic tachometer to display the RPM of a lathe or milling machine? If so, Elektor has the project for you.

The electronics tachometer design features an Arduino micro board and  a 0.96″ OLED display from Adafruit for instantaneous readout. The compact instrument also has a clock displaying the equipment running time.

Navy Engineer’s Innovation Space

When electrical engineer Bill Porter isn’t working on unmanned systems projects for the Navy, he spends a great deal of engineering time at his workspace in Panama City Beach, FL. Bill submitted the interesting images that follow (along with several others) for an interview we plan to run an upcoming issue of Circuit Cellar magazine. Once we saw his workspace images, we knew we had to feature it on our site as soon as possible.

The workspace of a true innovator (Source: Bill Porter)

The workspace of a true innovator (Source: Bill Porter)

Check out Bill working on a project. He told us: “I am a hardware guy. I love to fire up my favorite PCB CAD software just to get an idea out of my head and on the screen.”

Bill is self-proclaimed "hardware guy"

Bill is self-proclaimed “hardware guy” (Source: Bill Porter)

Interesting the sorts of things Bill designs? Check out his wedding-related projects.

Pretty unique proposal, right? (Source: Bill Porter)

Pretty unique proposal, right? (Source: Bill Porter)

This is just one of the many electrical engineering-related items developed for his wedding (Source: Bill Porter)

This is just one of the many electrical engineering-related items developed for his wedding (Source: Bill Porter)

You’ll be able to learn more about his innovations in a future issue of Circuit Cellar magazine.

Share your space! Circuit Cellar is interested in finding as many workspaces as possible and sharing them with the world. Email our editors to submit photos and information about your workspace. Write “workspace” in the subject line of the email, and include info such as where you’re located (city, country), the projects you build in your space, your tech interests, your occupation, and more. If you have an interesting space, we might feature it on CircuitCellar.com!

One-Wire RS-232 Half Duplex (EE Tip #135)

Traditional RS-232 communication needs one transmit line (TXD or TX), one receive line (RXD or RX), and a Ground return line. The setup allows a full-duplex communication. However, many applications use only half-duplex transmissions, as protocols often rely on a transmit/acknowledge scheme. With a simple circuit like Figure 1, this is achieved using only two wires (including Ground). This circuit is designed to work with a “real” RS-232 interface (i.e., using positive voltage for logic 0s and negative voltage for logic 1s), but by reversing the diodes it also works on TTL-based serial interfaces often used in microcontroller designs (where 0 V = logic 0; 5 V = logic 1). The circuit needs no additional voltage supply, no external power, and no auxiliary voltages from other RS-232 pins (RTS/CTS or DTR/DSR).Grun1-Wire-RS232-HalfDup

Although not obvious at a first glance, the diodes and resistors form a logic AND gate equivalent to the one in Figure 2 with the output connected to both receiver inputs. The default (idle) output is logic 1 (negative voltage) so the gate’s output follows the level of the active transmitter. The idle transmitter also provides the negative auxiliary voltage –U in Figure 2. Because both receivers are connected to one line, this circuit generates a local echo of the transmitted characters into the sender’s receiver section. If this is not acceptable, a more complex circuit like the one shown in Figure 3 is needed (only one side shown). This circuit needs no additional voltage supply either. In this circuit the transmitter pulls its associated receiver to logic 1 (i.e., negative voltage) by a transistor (any standard NPN type) when actively sending a logic 0 (i.e., positive voltage) but keeps the receiver “open” for the other transmitter when idle (logic 1). Here a negative auxiliary voltage is necessary which is generated by D2 and C1. Due to the start bit of serial transmissions, the transmission line is at logic 1 for at least one bit period per character. The output impedance of most common RS-232 drivers is sufficient to keep the voltage at C1 at the necessary level.

Note: Some RS-232 converters have quite low input impedance; the values shown for the resistors should work in the majority of cases, but adjustments may be necessary. In case of extremely low input impedance, the receiving input of the sender may show large voltage variations between 1s and 0s. As long as the voltage is below –3 V at any time these variations may be ignore.— Andreas Grün, “One Wire RS-232 Half Duplex,” Elektor July/August 2009.