Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

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You’ll get your IoT Technology Focus newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(2/27 Wednesday) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (3/6) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (3/13) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (2/20) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(2/27) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Analog & Power. (3/6) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Plessey Demos MicroLEDs for VR Displays

Plessey Semiconductors has successfully demonstrated how its monolithic microLED technology can be used to deliver the next-generation of Head-Up Displays (HUDs), enabling new AR and VR applications. According to the company, MicroLEDs are emerging as the only technology that can provide high luminance in a small format. All leading manufacturers of wearable technologies are currently pursuing manufactures that can deliver an ideal microLED solution. With this demonstrator, Plessey has confirmed it is ready to enable its partners to move into production of a monolithic display based on microLEDs using the company’s proprietary GaN-on-Silicon approach.

The demonstrator, which has been produced in collaboration with Artemis Optical, combines Plessey’s monolithic display, based on an array of microLEDs integrated alongside an active matrix backplane, with the patented film technology and a single lens arrangement from Artemis. The combination of technologies removes ambient light in the wavelength matching the microLED display output, resulting in a HUD that delivers very high display brightness with low power consumption, in a format that is considerably smaller than existing HUD designs, yet still offers significant cost savings.

During CES 2018, Plessey Semiconductor and Artemis Optical presented the demonstrator to many leading companies developing VR and AR electronics. Headsets and eyewear outfitted for AR and VR applications are set for record sales this year of $1.2 billion in the US market alone, according to the Consumer Technology Association (CTA).

Plessey Semiconductor | www.plesseysemiconductors.com

HDMI TFT Modules Simplify Connectivity

HDMI TFT module product line that greatly simplifies the process of connecting to the display. Rather than juggling an FPC ribbon cable with a middle-man controller board, you can connect an HDMI cable from your desired board or computer right into the TFT module. This makes it easy to interface with your display from the development and prototyping stages, all the way into final application production.

The ease-of-use of these new products follows through into touch panel integration as well. For both the resistive and capacitive (PCAP) touch panel options, USB-HID driver recognition is installed. Each of the touch panel modules are also each pre-calibrated in-house to the display they’re mounted on. This means that a simple USB to micro-USB cable just needs to be connected from your board with touch interaction output (such as Raspberry Pi) to the module and your touch interactivity is ready to go immediately.

NVIDIA Graphics Tapped for Mercedes-Benz MBUX AI Cockpit

At the CES show last month, Mercedes-Benz its NVIDIA-powered MBUX infotainment system–a next-gen car cabin experience can learn and adapt to driver and passenger preferences, thanks to artificial intelligence.

According to NVIDIA, all the key MBUX systems are built together with NVIDIA, and they’re all powered by NVIDIA. The announcement comes a year after Huang joined Mercedes-Benz execs on stage at CES 2017 and said that their companies were collaborating on an AI car that would be ready in 2018.

Powered by NVIDIA graphics and deep learning technologies, the Mercedes-Benz User Experience, or MBUX, has been designed to deliver beautiful new 3D touch-screen displays. It can be controlled with a new voice-activated assistant that can be summoned with the phrase “Hey, Mercedes. It’s an intelligent learning system that adapts to the requirements of customers, remembering such details as the seat and steering wheel settings, lights and other comfort features.

The MBUX announcement highlights the importance of AI to next-generation infotainment systems inside the car, even as automakers are racing put AI to work to help vehicles navigate the world around them autonomously. The new infotainment system aims to use AI to adapt itself to drivers and passengers— automatically suggesting your favorite music for your drive home, or offering directions to a favorite restaurant at dinner time. It’s also one that will benefit from “over-the-air” updates delivering new features and capabilities.

Debuting in this month (February) in the new Mercedes-Benz A-Class, MBUX will power dramatic wide-screen displays that provide navigation, infotainment and other capabilities, touch-control buttons on the car’s steering wheel, as well as an intelligent assistant that can be summoned with a voice command. It’s an interface that can change its look to reflect the driver’s mood—whether they’re seeking serenity or excitement—and understand the way a user talks.

NVIDIA | www.nvidia.com

Module Pair Designed to Intel’s SDM Spec

Giada will present its newly-launched SDM modules following Intel’s new Intel Smart Display Modules specification and reference design at the upcoming ISE 2018 in Amsterdam. The new modules, using a SoC (System on Chip) processor, can fit into compact, all-in-one designs as new displays get thinner and power-efficient performance becomes more critical.

The larger and more powerful SDM-7300U (shown here), to be shown for the first time globally at ISE 2018, features an Intel Kaby lake Core i5 7300U CPU and supports up to 32 GB DDR4 memory. The module, offering an HDMI port, can display video and images with 4k resolution. This module, incorporating high-speed PCIe connectivity with a custom I/O receptacle board, is compatible with Windows and Linux operation systems.

The smaller module, the entry level SDM Z8350, was announced in Q3 2017. It features an Intel Atom Cherrytrail Z8350 CPU and up to 2 GB onboard memory. It is equipped with a 32 GB eMMC and can support two independent displays with a DP port and an HDMI port. The module, with SDM Standard I/O, can support Windows, Linux and Android 5.1.

Giada is a close partner of Intel in the SDM program and initially will launch two SDM modules. A smaller module (109×60mm) with an entry-level processor and a larger module (110×175mm) with a high performance processor. Both SDM modules come without housing and are optimized for digital signage, public kiosks, professional monitors, point-of-sale, projectors, bedside terminals, hospitality and more applications. They can be applied all around the retail industry, especially on visual retail and transactional and responsive retail.

Giada | www.giadatech.com

 

 

 

 

Details about the two new SDM modules

 

Analyst 2017 Review: Mobile Devices Dominated GPU Market

Jon Peddie Research (JPR), a market research and consulting firm focused on graphics and multimedia offers its annual review of GPU developments for 2017. In spite of the slow decline of the PC market overall, PC-based GPU sales, which include workstations, have been increasing, according to the review. In the mobile market, integrated GPUs have risen at the same rate as mobile devices and the SoCs in them. The same is true for the console market where integrated graphics are in every console and they too have increased in sales over the year.

Nearly 28% of the world’s population bought a GPU device in 2017, and that’s in addition to the systems already in use. And yet, probably less than half of them even know what the term GPU stands for, or what it does. To them the technology is invisible, and that means it’s working—they don’t have to know about it.

The market for, and use of, GPUs stretches from supercomputers and medical devices to gaming machines, mobile devices, automobiles, and wearables. Just about everyone in the industrialized world has at least a half dozen products with one a GPU, and technophiles can easily count a dozen or more. The manufacturing of GPUs approaches science fiction with features that will move below 10 nm next year and have a glide-path to 3 nm, and some think even 1 nm—Moore’s law is far from dead, but is getting trickier to coax out of the genie’s bottle as we drive into subatomic realms that can only be modeled and not seen.

Over the past 12 months JPR has a seen a few new, and some clever adaptations of GPUs that show the path for future developments and subsequent applications. 2017 was an amazing year for GPU development driven by games, eSports, AI, crypto currency mining, and simulations. Autonomous vehicles started to become a reality, as did augmented reality. The over-hyped consumer-based PC VR market explosion didn’t happen, and had little to no impact on GPU developments or sales. Most of the participants in VR already had a high-end system and the HMD was just another display to them.

Mobile GPUs, exemplified by products from Qualcomm, ARM and Imagination Technologies are key to amazing devices with long battery life, screens at or approaching 4K, and in 2017 people started talking about and showing HDR.

JPR’s review says that many, if not all, the developments we will see in 2018 were started as early as 2015, and that three to four-year lead time will continue. Lead times could get longer as we learn how to deal with chips constructed with billions of transistor manufactured at feature sizes smaller than X-rays. Ironically, buying cycles are also accelerating ensuring strong competition as players try to leap-frog each other in innovation. According to JPR, we’ll see considerable innovation in 2018, with AI being the leading application that will permeate every sector of our lives.

The JPR GPU Developments in 2017 Report is free to all subscribers of JPR. Individual copies of the report can be purchased for $100.

Jon Peddie Research | www.jonpeddie.com

Bonus Newsletter: Displays and Graphics

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: January has a 5th Tuesday, so we’ve added a bonus topic to our four-week newsletter rotation. We’re bringing you a Bonus newsletter: Displays and Graphics. Display technology is where the user interacts with today’s modern embedded electronic devices This newsletter content examines the latest technology and product developments in displays along with the graphics ICs that drive those displays.

Plus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Displays and Graphics newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. (2/6) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch. (2/13) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (2/20) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(2/27 Wednesday) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Next Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter content focuses on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Embedded Boards newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

January has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
Displays and Graphics. (1/30) Display technology is where the user interacts with today’s modern embedded electronic devices This newsletter content examines the latest technology and product developments in displays along with the graphics ICs that drive those displays.

Analog & Power. (2/6) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch. (2/13) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. (2/20) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: IoT Tech Focus

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your IoT Technology Focus newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards.(1/23 Wednesday) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

January has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:
Displays and Graphics. (1/30) Display technology is where the user interacts with today’s modern embedded electronic devices This newsletter content examines the latest technology and product developments in displays along with the graphics ICs that drive those displays.

Analog & Power. (2/6) This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op amps, batteries and more.

Microcontroller Watch (2/13) This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Tuesday’s Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

Coming to your inbox tomorrow: Circuit Cellar’s Microcontroller Watch newsletter. Tomorrow’s newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your Microcontroller Watch newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our weekly Circuit Cellar Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. (1/16) Covers what’s happening with Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology–-from devices to gateway networks to cloud architectures. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards.(1/23) The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

January has a 5th Tuesday, so we’re bringing you a bonus newsletter:

Displays and Graphics. (1/30) Display technology is where the user interacts with today’s modern embedded electronic devices This newsletter content examines the latest technology and product developments in displays along with the graphics ICs that drive those displays.

Designing High Performance GUIs

329 Brumby Lead Image for Web

UIs for the Multicore Era

For embedded developers, it’s critical to understand the types of performance problems a typical end-user might encounter and the performance metrics relevant to user
interface (UI) design. Phil examines these and other important UI design challenges.

By Phil Brumby
Mentor, Embedded Systems Division

The widespread proliferation of portable media devices has changed the way we interact with each other on a daily basis. In fact, there is now a generation of users who grew up with some type of touchscreen device. These users no longer see the UI as new or revolutionary, but rather as a standard piece of mobile device functionality. This phenomenon has created a new set of expectations. It means any device with an LCD must offer a fluid and intuitive user experience. It’s also expected that the touchscreen has to be “smartphone-like” whenever the device is powered on. Embedded system developers are now under pressure across multiple markets and device types to replicate the smartphone UI interactive experience.

The importance of getting the UI right is absolutely critical to the success of the device. Underpinning documented UI design methodologies is a need for the device to operate in a way that it will not impinge or be detrimental to the user experience. For developers, it’s necessary to understand the types of performance problems a typical end-user might encounter, and through an understanding of performance metrics employ various analyses to highlight the bottlenecks and performance degradation issues.

A key advantage to system start-up is analyzing selected input events.

A key advantage to system start-up is
analyzing selected input events.

TYPICAL PERFORMANCE ISSUES

To understand how to best analyze performance, it’s important to look at typical performance issues from the end-user’s perspective. In identifying these issues, developers can begin to identify the first data points or metrics needed for feedback on system performance.

Responsiveness: Responsiveness can be thought of as the time it takes for the user to receive feedback from the UI as a result of an input action made. Typically, this consists of a touchscreen input, but also includes hard key presses. Responsiveness is important as the user must feel the device performs within a certain timeframe to avoid the feeling a UI is “laggy” or slow to respond. Delays in updating the UI in response to input can result in frustration and mistakes made by the user.

Animation smoothness: Animation smoothness relates to the visible motion or change in appearance of elements displayed within the UI. As an element transitions from one point in 3D space to another, does it do so in a smooth manner that is pleasing to the eye? Animation smoothness is important because if the user perceives jagged or staggered motion in a transition, it will degrade the overall interactive experience.   …

Read the full article in the December 329 issue of Circuit Cellar

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Client Profile: Newhaven Display International, Inc.

About Newhaven Display
Since 2001, Newhaven Display has been providing the worldwide marketplace with cost-effective, high-quality displays, including OLEDs, LCDs, and VFDs. In addition to its vast standard part offerings, Newhaven Display develops custom display designs for all industries. It prides itself on first-rate customer support, design services, and development assistance.
At its Elgin, IL headquarters, Newhaven Display performs product quality inspections, stock, design, develop, manufacture, and assemble our display products. All of its partnered production centers are state-of-the-art facilities with extensive experience in display development. Newhaven Display works closely with its production centers to ensure its products meet all requirements of proper design and quality standards.

NewhavenDisplay

Why Should CC Readers Be Interested?
Newhaven Display offers a variety of high-quality TFT displays. Ranging from 1.8” to 7.0”, these TFTs come ready with the option of capacitive or resistive touch and are available as standard, Premium (MVA), or Sunlight Readable displays. When wider viewing areas are needed, the Premium TFTs have up to 75° view from all sides, whereas the Sunlight Readable TFTs are the ideal option for outdoor applications.
To help with developing with these TFTs, Newhaven Display also has plug-and-play BeagleBone and Arduino development boards that make prototyping a breeze. Developed and designed by Newhaven Display’s engineers in Elgin, IL, these boards are perfect for any level of engineer looking to get started with TFT development. For high-quality, brilliant TFT displays and development assistance, turn to Newhaven Display.

Elgin, IL, USA
www.newhavendisplay.com