Suite of Certification of Evidence Rolls for Wind River Cert RTOS

Wind River has announced the release of a full suite of automotive, avionics, and industrial safety certification evidence for the latest version of its VxWorks Cert Edition real-time operating system (RTOS). The RTOS for safety-critical applications is designed and developed to the highest achievable safety levels accepted by worldwide certification authorities.

VxWorks solutions have been used in more than 550 safety certification programs by more than 350 customers across industries. This most recent suite of certification evidence builds on Wind River’s 20-plus years of experience in safety certification software products, and demonstrates the company’s commitment to industry-leading safe, secure, and reliable solutions.

Like the RTOS itself, the commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) evidence is designed for reuse and portability with long-term cost-of-ownership benefits for safety-critical projects, including those specifically targeting compliance to the following standards:

  • Automotive: ISO 26262 Automotive Safety Integrity Level (ASIL) D backed by certificates issued by independently accredited certification authority TÜV SÜD
  • Avionics: DO-178C Design Assurance Level (DAL) A
  • Industrial: IEC 61508 Safety Integrity Level (SIL) 3 backed by certificates issued by independently accredited certification authority TÜV SÜD

In addition to VxWorks Cert Edition, the Wind River safety portfolio includes the VxWorks 653 integrated modular avionics (IMA) platform.

Wind River | www.windriver.com

Tool Revision Adds Arm Cortex-M Trace and Debug Support

Lauterbach has announced a new revision of their debug and trace probes for Cortex-M based devices. As Cortex-M processors are becoming clocked at greater and greater frequencies, the trace port clocks must also increase to keep pace and prevent loss of valuable data. To provide developers with a more future-proof solution to this perpetual cycle of increasing frequency, the new High-Speed Whisker cables are designed to work with trace clock frequencies of up to 200 MHz across trace ports ranging from 1-bit to 4-bits wide, giving a total trace port bandwidth of up to 200 MB/s.
With increased trace clock speeds comes an increased risk of signal misalignment when parallel trace pins are sampled. The High-Speed Whisker cable includes the innovative auto-focus technology that not only detects the trace port clock frequency but can also adjust the optimum sampling points of each pin to negate any alignment issues in the timing of the data signals. The points where each signal contains valid data, or data eyes, for each pin can be displayed in the TRACE32 PowerView software.

Detailed information about jitters, rising and falling edges is also displayed and users are provided with the capability of manually adjusting the sampling point of each signal. Once configured, these sampling points may be saved and recalled for future use of the tools on this target. The High-Speed Whisker cable will start shipping in January 2019 for TRACE32 µTrace and CombiProbe. Customers who purchased these units during 2018 may request a free upgrade.

Lauterbach | www.lauterbach.com

 

 

Three Firms Team Up for Industrial IoT Security Effort

IAR Systems, Secure Thingz and Renesas Electronics have announced their collaboration to secure Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) applications. As part of this collaboration, the companies will develop new solutions that combine IAR Systems’ software development technology, Secure Thingz’ expertise in advanced IoT security, and Renesas Electronics’ secure semiconductor technologies.

Security is an inherent risk when it comes to connected devices. In the Industrial IoT, incoming threats and system vulnerabilities can result in life-threatening or high-risk situations. Therefore, embedded applications in this area require very strong features for security and reliability. To meet these requirements, Secure Thingz’ Embedded Trust, which is a security development environment that leverages the IAR Embedded Workbench IDE from IAR Systems, will support Renesas microcontrollers (MCUs) when Embedded Trust is launched to the broader market in 2019. This new hardware and software solution will enable organizations to secure their systems, intellectual property (IP) and data.

“Despite legislation and new security standards mandating greater protection, the news stories of hacking, theft and counterfeiting still persist. It is now a question of when, and not if, you will be compromised,” says Haydn Povey, CEO, Secure Thingz. “At Secure Thingz, we are collaborating with trusted industry friends to secure the connected world and inhibit these compromises. The collaboration between Secure Thingz, IAR Systems and Renesas will help organizations conquer the security challenges of today and tomorrow.”

“To really deliver on the promise of the IoT, embedded applications will need to include security from start, both in hardware and software,” says Stefan Skarin, CEO, IAR Systems. “IAR Systems’ long-standing collaboration with Renesas has resulted in a number of successful activities and solutions. Now with connected IoT devices all around us and ongoing security threats, we as suppliers need to help our customers in the best way we can. IAR Systems and Secure Thingz are working together to make superior security available for all, and we are pleased to have Renesas with us on this journey.”

“With increased connectivity come greater security risks, and the growing number of connected industrial devices requires a stronger focus on security from the early stages of chip design to protect both the silicon solution and the application from potential security issues,” says Yoshikazu Yokota, Executive Vice President and General Manager of Industrial Solution Business Unit, Renesas Electronics Corporation. “For the past 30 years, our collaboration with IAR Systems has introduced reliable and high-performance solutions that have enabled the creation of innovative embedded designs, and with the addition of Secure Thingz moving forward, we are poised to support the next generation of Industrial IoT design with the security it needs.”

IAR Systems | www.iar.com

Secure Thingz | www.securethingz.com

Renesas Electronics | www.renesas.com

 

 

New IDE Version Shrinks Arm MCU Executable Program Sizes

After a successful beta period, Segger Microcontroller has added the new Linker and Link-Time Optimization (LTO) to the latest release build of their powerful cross-platform integrated development environments, Embedded Studio for ARM and Embedded Studio for Cortex-M.

The new product versions deliver on the promise of program size reduction, achieving a significant 5-12% reduction over the previous versions on typical applications, and even higher gains compared to conventional GCC tool chains. These savings are the result of the new LTO, combined with Segger’s Linker and Run-time library emLib-C. Through LTO, it is possible to optimize the entire application, opening the door for optimization opportunities that are simply not available to the compiler.

The Linker adds features such as compression of initialized data and deduplication, as well as the flexibility of dealing with fragmented memory maps that embedded developers have to cope with. Like all Segger software, it is written from scratch for use in deeply embedded computing systems. Additionally, the size required by the included runtime library is significantly lower than that of runtime libraries used by most GCC tool chains.

Segger Microcontroller | www.segger.com

SBC Showcases Qualcomm’s 10 nm, Octa-core QCS605 IoT SoC

By Eric Brown

In April, Qualcomm announced its QCS605 SoC, calling it “the first 10nm FinFET fabricated SoC purpose built for the Internet of Things.” The octa-core Arm SoC is available in an Intrinsyc Open-Q 605 SBC with full development kit with a 12V power supply is open for pre-orders at $429. The products will ship in early December.

 
Open-Q 605, front and back
(click images to enlarge)
The fact that Qualcomm is billing the high-end QCS605 as an IoT SoC reveals how demand for vision and AI processing on the edge is broadening the IoT definition to encompass a much higher range of embedded technology. The IoT focus is also reinforced by the lack of the usual Snapdragon branding. The QCS605 is accompanied by the Qualcomm Vision Intelligence Platform, a set of mostly software components that includes the Qualcomm Neural Processing SDK and camera processing software, as well as the company’s 802.11ac WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity and security technologies.

The QCS605 can run Linux or Android, but Intrinsyc supports its Open-Q 605 board only with Android 8.1.

Intrinsyc also recently launched an Open-Q 624A Development Kit based on a new Open-Q 624A SOM (see farther below).

Qualcomm QCS605 and Vision Intelligence Platform

The QCS605 SoC features 8x Kryo 300 CPU cores, two of which are 2.5GHz “gold” cores that are equivalent to Cortex-A75. The other six are 1.7GHz “silver” cores like the Cortex-A55 — Arm’s more powerful follow-on to Cortex-A53.

The QCS605 also integrates an Adreno 615 GPU, a Hexagon 685 DSP with Hexagon vector extensions (“HVX”), and a Spectra 270 ISP that supports dual 16-megapixel image sensors. Qualcomm also sells a QCS603 model that is identical except that it offers only 2x of the 1.7GHz “Silver” cores instead of six.

Qualcomm sells the QCS605 as part of a Vision Intelligence Platform — a combination of software and hardware starting with a Qualcomm AI Engine built around the Qualcomm Snapdragon Neural Processing Engine (NPE) software framework. The NPE provides analysis, optimization, and debugging tools for developing with Tensorflow, Caffe, and Caffe2 frameworks. The AI Engine also includes the Open Neural Network Exchange interchange format, the Android Neural Networks API, and the Qualcomm Hexagon Neural Network library, which together enable the porting of trained networks.

The Vision Intelligence Platform running on the QCS605 delivers up to 2.1 TOPS (trillion operations per second) of compute performance for deep neural network inferences, claims Qualcomm. The platform also supports up to 4K60 resolution or 5.7K at 30fps and supports multiple concurrent video streams at lower resolutions.

Other features include “staggered” HDR to prevent ghost effects in high-dynamic range video. You also get advanced electronic image stabilization, de-warp, de-noise, chromatic aberration correction, and motion compensated temporal filters in hardware.

Inside the Open-Q 605 SBC

Along with the Snapdragon 600 based Open-Q 600, the Open-Q 605 is the only Open-Q development board that Intrinsyc refers to as an SBC. Most Open-Q kits are compute modules or sandwich-style carrier board starter kits based on Intrinsyc modules equipped with Snapdragon SoCs, such as the recent, Snapdragon 670 based Open-Q 670 HDK.


Open-Q 605 
(click image to enlarge)
The 68 x 50mm Open-Q 605 ships with an eMCP package with 4GB LPDDR4x RAM and 32GB eMMC flash, and additional storage is available via a microSD slot. Networking depends on the 802.11ac (WiFi 5) and Bluetooth 5.x radios. There’s also a Qualcomm GNSS receiver for location and 3x U.FL connectors.

The only real-world coastline port is a USB Type-C that supports DisplayPort 1.4 with 4K@30fps support. If you’d rather use the Type-C port for USB or charging a user-supplied Li-Ion battery, you can turn to an HD-ready MIPI DSI interface with touch support. You also get 2x MIPI-CSI for dual cameras, as well as 2x analog audio.

The Open-Q 605 has a 76-pin expansion header for other interfaces, including an I2S/SLIMBus digital audio interface. The board runs on a 5-15V DC input and offers an extended -25 to 60°C operating range.

Specifications listed for the Open-Q 605 SBC include:

  • Processor — Qualcomm QCS605 with Vision Intelligence Platform (2x up to 2.5GHz and 6x up to 1.7GHz Krait 300 cores); Adreno 615 GPU; Hexagon 685 DSP; Spectra 270 ISP; Qualcomm AI Engine and other VIP components
  • Memory/storage — 4GB LPDDR4X and 32GB eMMC flash in combo eMCP package; microSD slot.
  • Wireless:
    • 802.11b/g/n/ac 2×2 dual-band WiFi (Qualcomm WCN3990) with planned FCC/IC/CE certification
    • Bluetooth 5.x
    • Qualcomm GNSS (SDR660G) receiver with Qualcomm Location Suite Gen9 VT
    • U.FL antenna connectors for WiFi, BT, GNSS
  • Media I/O:
    • DisplayPort 1.4 via USB Type-C up to 4K@30 with USB data concurrency (USB and power)
    • MIPI DSI (4-lane) with I2C touch interface on flex cable connector for up to 1080p30
    • 2x MIPI-CSI (4-lane) with micro-camera module connectors
    • 2x analog mic I/Ps, speaker O/P, headset I/O
    • I2S/SLIMBus digital audio interface with 2x DMIC ports (via 76-pin expansion header)
  • Expansion — 76-pin header (multiple SPI, I2C, UART, GPIO, and sensor I/O; digital and analog audio I/O, LED flash O/P, haptic O/P, power output rails
  • Other features — 3x LEDs; 4x mounting holes; optional dev kit with quick start guide, docs, SW updates
  • Operating temperature — -25 to 60°C
  • Power — 5-15V DC jack and support for user-supplied Li-Ion battery with USB Type-C charging; PM670 + PM670L PMIC; 12V supply with dev kit
  • Dimensions — 68 x 50 x 13mm
  • Operating system — Android 8.1 Oreo

Open-Q 624A
Development Kit

Open-Q 624A Development Kit

Back in May, Google preannounced the Open-Q 624A Development Kit as an official Android Things 1.0 development board along with Intrinsyc’s Snapdragon 212 based Open-Q 212A, Innocomm’s i.MX8M based WB10-AT, and a MediaTek MT8516 development platform. Now, Intrinsyc is pitching the Open-Q 624A Development Kit, as well as the Open-Q 624A SOM module it’s based on, as an Android 8.0 platform aimed at the home hub market. There is no longer any mention of Android Things.

The Open-Q 624A SOM offers 2GB RAM, 4GB eMMC, WiFi-ac, BT 4.2, and an octa-core -A53 Qualcomm Snapdragon 624 SoC based on the Snapdragon 625. The kit is equipped with a USB 3.0 Type-C port, 2x USB host ports, micro-USB client and debug ports, MIPI-CSI and MIPI-DSI interfaces, sensor expansion and haptic output, and an optional GPS receiver. You also get extensive audio features, including I2S/SLIMBUS headers.

Available for $595, the sandwich style kit will ship in mid-December. For more details, see our earlier Android Things development board report.

Further information

The Open-Q 605 SBC is available for pre-order in the full Development Kit version, which costs $429 and ships in early December. The SBC will also be sold on its own at an undisclosed price. More information may be found in Intrinsyc’s Open-Q 605 announcement, as well as the product page and shopping page.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on November 14.

Intrinsyc | www.intrinsyc.com

AVR Microcontrollers Get MPLAB X IDE Support

Designers who have traditionally used Microchip’s PIC microcontrollers and developed with the MPLAB ecosystem can now easily evaluate and incorporate AVR MCUs into their applications. The majority of AVR MCUs are now beta supported with the release of MPLAB X Integrated Development Environment (IDE) version 5.05, available now from Microchip Technology. Support for additional AVR MCUs and enhancements will be added in future MPLAB versions. AVR support will continue to be added to Atmel Studio 7 and Atmel START for current and future AVR devices.

MPLAB X IDE version 5.05 provides a unified development experience that is both cross-platform and scalable with compatibility on Windows, macOS and Linux operating systems, allowing designers to develop with AVR MCUs on their hardware system of choice. The tool chain has been enhanced with support for Microchip’s code configuration tool, MPLAB Code Configurator (MCC), making it easy for developers to configure software components and device settings such as clocks, peripherals and pin layout with the tools’ menu-driven interface. MCC can also generate code for specific development boards, such as Microchip’s Curiosity ATmega4809 Nano (DM320115) development board and existing AVR Xplained development boards.

More compiler choices and debugger/programmer options are also available when compiling and programming AVR MCUs using MPLAB X IDE 5.05. Compiler choices include the AVR MCU GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) or the MPLAB XC8 C Compiler, providing developers with additional advanced software optimization techniques to reduce code size. Designers can also accelerate debugging and programming using MPLAB PICki 4 programmer/debugger tool or the newly released MPLAB Snap programmer/debugger tool.

The majority of development boards available to evaluate and program AVR MCUs are supported by the MPLAB ecosystem and MCC. Xplained development boards are compatible with START and are now compatible with MPLAB X IDE. Xplained development boards are cost-effective, fully integrated MCU development platforms targeted at first-time users, makers, and those seeking a feature-rich rapid prototyping board. The Xplained platform includes an integrated programmer/debugger and requires no additional hardware to get started.

MPLAB X IDE version 5.05, MPLAB XC8 C Compiler and AVR MCU GCC are available for free on Microchip’s website. The MPLAB PICkit 4 (PG164140) development tool is available today for $47.95. The MPLAB Snap (PG164100) is available today for $14.95. The ATmega4809 Curiosity Nano board (DM320115) is available today for $10.00.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

MCUs Provide Inductive Sensing Solution

Cypress Semiconductor has announced production availability of the PSoC 4700S series of microcontrollers that use MagSense inductive sensing technology for contactless metal sensing. The series also incorporates Cypress’ industry-leading CapSense capacitive-sensing technology, empowering consumer, industrial, and automotive product developers to create sleek, state-of-the-art designs using metals and other materials. The highly-integrated MCUs enable cost-efficient system designs by reducing bill-of-material costs and provide superior noise immunity for reliable operation, even in extreme environmental conditions.
Cypress also announced availability of the new CY8CKIT-148 PSoC 4700S Inductive Sensing Evaluation Kit, a low-cost hardware platform that enables design and debug of the MCUs. The kit includes MagSense inductive-sensing buttons and a proximity sensor, as well as an FPC connector to evaluate various coils, such as a rotary encoder. The PSoC 4700S series is supported in Cypress’ PSoC Creator Integrated Design Environment (IDE), which allows users to drag and drop production-ready hardware blocks, including the MagSense inductive sensing capability, into a design and configure them easily via a simple graphical user interface.

The PSoC 4700S MCUs integrate:

  • A 32-bit Arm Cortex-M0+ core
  • Up to 32 KB Flash and 4 KB SRAM
  • 36 GPIOs
  • 7 programmable analog blocks
  • 7 programmable digital blocks

Support for up to 16 sensors, enabling implementation of buttons, linear and rotary encoders, and proximity sensing.

The CY8CKIT-148 PSoC 4700S Inductive Sensing Evaluation Kit is available for $49 at the Cypress online store and from select distributors.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

IAR Updates Dev Tools for Renesas Automotive MCUs

IAR Systems has announced a major update of its development tools for Renesas automotive-focused RH850 microcontrollers. The latest version of the complete C/C++ compiler and debugger toolchain IAR Embedded Workbench for Renesas RH850 offers boosted user experience and extended capabilities through a number of new features.

IAR Embedded Workbench for Renesas RH850 incorporates a compiler, a debugger, an assembler and a linker in one integrated development environment. It is available in several editions to suit different company needs, including a functional safety edition certified by TÜV SÜD according to IEC 61508, ISO 26262 and EN 50128. Renesas Electronics’ RH850 automotive MCU family includes rich functional safety and embedded security features needed for advanced automotive applications.
Version 2.10 of IAR Embedded Workbench for Renesas RH850 adds compliance with the latest C language standard ISO/IEC 9899:2011 and the latest C++ standard ISO/IEC 14882:2014, ensuring high-quality, future-proof code. Renowned for producing very efficient code, the IAR C/C++ Compiler™ in IAR Embedded Workbench for Renesas RH850 now supports stack protection and stack usage analysis functionality. Available as an add-on for the toolchain is the static analysis tool C-STAT, which is now updated with a number of new checks. With these additions, developers building RH850-based applications are able to further strengthen code quality, stability and reliability in their embedded applications.

Automotive embedded applications are growing in complexity, which means it can be challenging to make a correct setup of peripherals from scratch. The Renesas Smart Configurator is a tool for combining software, automatically generating control programs for peripheral modules, and pin setting from the GUI with built-in cross-checks to avoid potential contention with multiplexed functions. In version 2.10 of IAR Embedded Workbench for Renesas RH850, automated code generation from Renesas Smart Configurator is made possible through the straight-forward project connection functionality.

IAR Systems | www.iar.com

Mouser Stocking Microchip’s MPLAB Snap Development Tool

Global distributor Mouser Electronics is now stocking the MPLAB Snap in-circuit debugger and programmer from Microchip Technology. The MPLAB Snap provides affordable, fast, and easy debugging and programming of most PIC, AVR and SAM flash microcontrollers and dsPIC digital signal controllers (DSCs), using the powerful graphical user interface of MPLAB X integrated development environment (IDE).
The Microchip MPLAB Snap board, available from Mouser Electronics, features a powerful 32-bit 300 MHz SAM E70 Arm Cortex-M7 based microcontroller for quicker debug iterations. The debugger system executes code, like an actual device, because it uses the target device’s built-in emulation circuitry, instead of a special debugger chip. All available features of the device are accessible interactively and can be set and modified by the MPLAB X IDE interface. Additionally, the board matches the silicon clocking speed of the target device, allowing engineers to run programs at the device’s maximum speed.

The board connects to a computer via high-speed USB 2.0 interface and can be connected to the target device through an 8-pin single in-line (SIL) header. The connector uses two device input/output (I/O) pins and the reset line to implement in-circuit debugging and In-Circuit Serial Programming (ICSP™) capability. Along with its support for a wide target voltage range of 1.20 V to 5.5 V, the MPLAB Snap supports advanced interfaces such as 4-wire JTAG and Serial Wire Debug with streaming data gateway. It is also backward compatible for demo boards, headers and target systems using 2-wire JTAG and ICSP.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

Mouser Electronics | www.mouser.com

MCU Tool Update Eases Multicore Automotive Control Development

Renesas Electronics has announced an update to its Embedded Target for RH850 Multicore model-based development environment for multicore MCUs for automotive control applications. The update supports development of systems with multirate control (multiple control periods), which is now common in systems such as engine and body control systems. This model-based development environment has become practical even in software development scenarios for multicore MCUs, and can reduce the increasingly complex software development burdens especially in control system development of self-driving cars.
Renesas’ earlier RH850 multicore model-based development environment automatically allocated software to the multiple cores and although verifying performance was possible, in complex systems that included multirate control, it was necessary to implement everything manually, including the RTOS and device drivers. Now there’s ever-increasing requirements to boost engine and vehicle performance, and at the same time shorten product development time. By making this development environment support multirate control, it is possible to directly generate the multicore software code from the multirate control model. This has made it possible to evaluate the execution performance in simulation.

Not only does this allow execution performance to be estimated from the earliest stages of software development, this also makes it easy to feed back the verification results into the model itself. This enables the completeness of the system development to be improved early on in the process, and the burden of developing the ever-larger scale, and increasingly complex, software systems can be significantly reduced. Renesas is accelerating the practical utility of model-based development environments in software development for multicore processors and is leading the evolution of green electric vehicles as proposed in the Renesas autonomy concept.

Control functions development requires multirate control, such as intake/exhaust period in engine control, the period of fuel injection and ignition, and the period with which the car’s status is verified. These are all different periods. By applying the technology that generates RH850 multicore code from the Simulink control mode to multirate control, it has become possible to directly generate multicore code, even from models that include multiple periods, such as engine control.

Renesas also provides as an option for the Integrated Development Environment CS+ for the RH850, a cycle precision simulator that can measure time with a precision on par with that of actual systems. By using this option, it is possible to estimate the execution performance of a model of the multicore MCU at the early stages of software development. This can significantly reduce the software development period.

The JMAAB (Japan MBD Automotive Advisory Board), an organization that promotes model-based development for automotive control systems, recommends several control models from the JMAAB Control Modeling Guidelines. Of those, Renesas is providing in this update the Simulink® Scheduler Block, which conforms to type (alpha) which provides a scheduler layer in the upper layer. This makes it possible to follow the multirate single-task method without an OS, express the core specifications and synchronization in the Simulink model, and automatically generate multicore code for the RH850 to implement deterministic operations.

Along with advances in the degree of electronic control in today’s cars, integration is also progressing in the ECUs (electronic control units), which are comparatively small-scale systems. By supporting multirate control, making it easier to operate small-scale systems with different control periods with a multicore microcontroller, it is now possible to verify the operation of a whole ECU that integrates multiple systems.

The updated model-based development environment is planned to support Renesas’ RH850/P1H-C MCU that includes two cores by this fall, and also support for the RH850/E2x Series of MCUs that include up to six cores is in the planning. In addition, Renesas plans to deploy this development environment to the entire Renesas autonomy Platform, including the “R-Car” Family of SoCs.

Renesas is also continuing to work to further improve the efficiency of model-based software development, including model-based parallelization tools from partner companies and strengthening of related multirate control support execution performance estimation including the operating system. Moving forward, Renesas plans to apply the model-based design expertise fostered in its automotive development efforts in the continually growing RX Family in the industrial area which is seeing continued increases in both complexity and scale.

Renesas Electronics | www.renesas.com

IAR Systems Updates Dev Tools for Renesas RX MCUs

IAR Systems has released version 4.10 of the development toolchain IAR Embedded Workbench for Renesas RX. The new version includes several capabilities which enable developers to further ensure code quality and make debugging more efficient for embedded applications based on Renesas RX microcontrollers.
IAR Embedded Workbench for Renesas RX includes the IAR C/C++ Compiler that offers Renesas RX ABI compliance. With version 4.10, the toolchain includes compliance with the latest C language standard ISO/IEC 9899:2011 as well as the latest C++ standard ISO/IEC 14882:2014. The compiler now also supports stack protection.

To make debugging more efficient in IAR Embedded Workbench for Renesas RX, the new version adds support for the advanced on-chip debugging E2 emulator from Renesas. And for developers using IAR Embedded Workbench for Renesas RX with the static analysis tool C-STAT, they can now benefit from 20 new checks, some of which are enabled by default to further ensure code quality.

IAR Embedded Workbench for Renesas RX is available at several different editions to suit different needs, including a functional safety edition certified by TÜV SÜD according to IEC 61508, EN 50128, ISO 26262 and IEC 62304. More information about the tools and trial versions can be found at www.iar.com/iar-embedded-workbench/tools-for-rx/.

IAR Systems | www.iar.com

Keil Tools Support New Microchip SAML10/L11 MCUs

Arm Keil has announced that its MDK (Microcontroller Development Kit) supports the new SAM L10 and SAM L11 microcontroller families from Microchip. MDK v5.26 pre-release fully supports these devices with device family packs that include example applications for SAML10 and SAML11 Xplained Pro Evaluation Kits. Application notes show how to create projects with MDK for the SAM L10 and L11 devices,

The CMSIS-compliant device support makes it straightforward to integrate numerous CMSIS software components, including CMSIS-RTOS with Keil RTX or FreeRTOS kernels. The CMSIS-RTOS implementations are supported in the µVision Debugger with the Component Viewer for kernel awareness and the Event Recorder for analyzing the dynamic run-time behavior.

ULINKplus debug adapter enables high-resolution power measurement on SAML10/L11 devices. Using the µVision System Analyzer window you can observe the measurement data graphically and time-synchronized with other system events. The Event Statistics feature allows developers to collect statistical data about execution time and power consumption when running application code. Microchip Xplained Pro Evaluation Kits expose necessary pins for MCU and I/O power measurements.

Arm Keil | www.keil.com

MCU/MPUs Target Next-Gen Electric and Autonomous Vehicles

NXP Semiconductors  has announced a new family of high-performance safe microprocessors to control vehicle dynamics in next-generation electric and autonomous vehicles. The new NXP S32S microprocessors will manage the systems that accelerate, brake and steer vehicles safely, whether under the direct control of a driver or an autonomous vehicle’s control.

NXP is addressing the needs of carmakers developing future autonomous and hybrid electric vehicles with newly available 800 MHz MCU/MPUs. The first of the new S32 product lines, the S32S microprocessor offers the highest performance ASIL D capability available today, according to NXP.
The NXP S32S processors use an array of the new Arm Cortex-R52 cores, which integrate the highest level of safety features of any Arm processor. The array offers four fully independent ASIL D capable processing paths to support parallel safe computing. In addition, the S32S architecture supports a new “fail availability” capability allowing the device to continue to operate after detecting and isolating a failure—a critical capability for future autonomous applications.

NXP has partnered with OpenSynergy to develop a fully featured, real-time hypervisor supporting the NXP S32S products. OpenSynergy’s COQOS Micro SDK is one of the first hypervisor platforms that takes advantage of the Arm Cortex-R52’s special hardware features. It enables the integration of multiple real-time operating systems onto microcontrollers requiring high levels of safety (up to ISO26262 ASIL D). Multiple vendor independent OS/stacks can also run on a single microcontroller. COQOS Micro SDK provides secure, safe and fast context switching ahead of today’s software-only solutions in traditional microcontrollers.

NXP Seimconductors | www.nxp.com

Development Tool Speeds IoT Sensor Design

STMicroelectronics offers a tool called AlgoBuilder designed to take the coding out of firmware development by letting users build sensor-control algorithms graphically with library modules, ready to compile and run on an STM32 microcontroller.

Created to simplify development of IoT devices containing ST’s MEMS sensors and MCUs, AlgoBuilder helps quickly get a proof-of-concept model up and running. Users can build their algorithms quickly and intuitively by dragging and dropping selected functions, connecting the blocks, and configuring properties. AlgoBuilder validates all design rules and automatically generates C code based on the graphical design.
AlgoBuilder provides libraries such as logic and mathematical operators, signal processing, user inputs, vector operations, and many others. Turnkey algorithms for commonly used functions such as sensor hub, motion-sensor calibration, activity recognition, motion intensity, and pedometer are included. Users can also add their own custom functions to the AlgoBuilder libraries.

AlgoBuilder provides an environment for connecting them with other logic to create a complete firmware project ready to compile using an STM32 IDE (Integrated Development Environment) such as TrueSTUDIO for STM32, SW4STM32 System Workbench for STM32, IAR-EWARM IAR Embedded Workbench for Arm and Keil µVision MDK-ARM-STM32.

AlgoBuilder can generate firmware for deployment on various STM32 platforms. These include the NUCLEO-F401RE and NUCLEO-L476RG development boards with the X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2 MEMS-sensor expansion board, and ST’s SensorTile IoT module. The SensorTile integrates a STM32L476JG ultra-low-power MCU, motion and environmental MEMS sensors and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) connectivity.

Users can test their firmware by launching the Unicleo-GUI application from within AlgoBuilder, to display outputs from running firmware. Unicleo-GUI is a dedicated sensor graphical user interface for use with ST’s sensor expansion software packages and X-NUCLEO boards, and lets users visualize sensor data as a time plot, scatter plot, or 3D plot.

AlgoBuilder is available now, and free to download from www.st.com/algobuilder-pr

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

Linux Still Rules IoT, Says Survey, with Raspbian Leading the Way

By Eric Brown

The Eclipse Foundation’s Eclipse IoT Working Group has released the results of its IoT Developer Survey 2018, which surveyed 502 Eclipse developers between January and March 2018. While the sample size is fairly low—LinuxGizmos’  own 2017 Hacker Board survey had 1,705 respondents—and although the IoT technologies covered here extend beyond embedded tech into the cloud, the results sync up pretty well with 2017 surveys of embedded developers from VDC Research and AspenCore (EETimes/Embedded). In short, Linux rules in Internet of Things development, but FreeRTOS is coming on fast. In addition, Amazon Web Services (AWS) is the leading cloud service for IoT.

 Eclipse IoT Developer Survey 2018 results for OS usage (top) and yearly variations for non-Linux platforms (bottom)
(Source: Eclipse Foundation)
(click images to enlarge)
 

When asked what operating systems were used for IoT, a total of 71.8% of the Eclipse survey respondents listed Linux, including Android and Android Things (see farther below). The next highest total was for Windows at 23%, a slight decrease from last year.

The open source, MCU-focused FreeRTOS advanced to 20%. Last December, the FreeRTOS project received major backing from Amazon. In fact, the Eclipse Foundation calls it an “acquisition.” This is never an entirely correct term when referring to a truly open source project such as FreeRTOS, but as with Samsung’s stewardship of Tizen, it appears to be essentially true.

Amazon collaborated with FreeRTOS technical leaders in spinning a new Amazon FreeRTOS variant linked to AWS IoT and AWS Greengrass. The significance of Amazon’s stake in FreeRTOS was one of the reasons Microsoft launched its Linux-based Azure Sphere secure IoT SoC platform, according to a VDC Research analyst.

The growth of FreeRTOS and Linux has apparently reduced the number of developers who code IoT devices without a formal OS or who use bare metal implementations. The “No OS/Bare Metal category” was second place in 2017, but has dropped sharply to share third place with FreeRTOS at 20%.

Other mostly open source RTOSes that had seen increases in 2017, such as mBed, Contiki, TinyOS, and Riot OS, dropped in 2018, with Contiki seeing the biggest dive. All these platforms led the open source Zephyr, however, as well as proprietary RTOSes like Micrium PS. The Intel-backed Zephyr may have declined in part due to Intel killing its Zephyr-friendly Curie module.

Eclipse IoT results for OS usage for constrained devices (top)
and gateways (bottom)

(Source: Eclipse Foundation)
(click images to enlarge)

When the Eclipse Foundation asked what OS was used for constrained devices, Linux still led the way, but had only 38.7%, followed by No OS/Bare Metal at 19.6%, FreeRTOS at 19.3%, and Windows at 14.1%. The others remained in the same order, ranging from Mbed at 7.7% to Riot OS at 4.7% for the next four slots.

When developers were asked about OS usage for IoT gateways, Linux dominated at 64.1% followed by Windows at 14.9%. Not surprisingly, the RTOSes barely registered here, with FreeRTOS leading at 5% and the others running at 2.2% or lower.

Eclipse IoT survey results for most popular Linux distributions
(Source: Eclipse Foundation)
(click image to enlarge)

Raspbian was the most popular Linux distro at 43.3%, showing just how far the Raspberry Pi has come to dominate IoT. The Debian based Ubuntu and more IoT-oriented Ubuntu Core were close behind for a combined 40.2%, and homegrown Debian stacks were used by 30.9%.

Android (19.6%) and the IoT-focused Android Things (7.9%) combined for 27.5%. Surprisingly, the open source Red Hat based distro CentOS came in next at 15.6%. Although CentOS does appear on embedded devices, its cloud server/cloud focus suggests that like Ubuntu, some of the Eclipse score came from developers working in IoT cloud stacks as well as embedded.

Yocto Project, which is not a distribution, but rather a set of standardized tools and recipes for DIY Linux development, came next at 14.2%. The stripped-down, networking focused OpenWrt and its variants, including the forked LEDE OS, combined for 7.9%. The OpenWrt and LEDE OS projects reunited as OpenWrt in January of this year. A version 18, due later this year, will attempt to integrate those elements that have diverged.

AWS and Azure rise, Google Cloud falls

The remainder of the survey dealt primarily with IoT software. Amazon’s AWS, which is the cloud platform used by its AWS IoT data aggregation platform and the related, Linux-based AWS Greengrass gateway and edge platform, led IoT cloud platforms with 51.8%. This was a 21% increase over the 2017 survey. Microsoft Azure’s share increased by 17% to 31.2%, followed by a combined score for private and on-premises cloud providers of 19.4%.

The total that used Google Cloud dropped by 8% to 18.8%. This was followed by Kubernetes, IBM Bluemix, and OpenStack On Premises.

Other survey findings include the continuing popularity of Java and MQTT among Eclipse developers. Usage of open source software of all kinds is increasing — for example, 93% of respondents say they use open source data base software, led by MySQL. Security and data collection/analytics were the leading developer concerns for IoT while interoperability troubles seem to be decreasing.

There were only a few questions about hardware, which is not surprising considering that Eclipse developers are primarily software developers. Cortex M3/M4 chips led among MCU platforms. For gateways there was an inconclusive mix of Intel and various Arm Cortex-A platforms. Perhaps most telling: 24.9% did not know what platform their IoT software would run on.

They did, however, know their favorite IDE. It starts with an E.

Further information

More information on the Eclipse IoT Developer Survey may be found in this blog announcement by Benjamin Cabé, which links to a slides from the full survey.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on April 30.

Eclipse IoT Working Group | iot.eclipse.org/working-group