MIPS Development Board Giveaway

Imagination recently launched the MIPS Creator CI20 development board, which is targeted at hobbyists, makers and schools working on open source projects. The system supports Linux (currently running Debian 7, but other images are also supported) and by the end of September Android 4.4 KitKat.

MIPS Creator C120 (Source: Imagination)

MIPS Creator C120 (Source: Imagination)

Its main hardware features include:

  • Ingenic JZ4780, dual 1.2-GHz MIPS32 processor, SGX540 GPU, 32k I&D L1 cache, 512-KB L2 cache
  • IEEE754 Floating Point Unit
  • 8-GB Flash, 1-GB DDR3 memory
  • Video playback up to 1080p
  • AC97 audio, via 4-pin input/output jack and HDMI connector
  • Camera interface –ITU645 controller
  • Connectivity – 10/100 Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0
  • HDMI output up to 2K resolution
  • 2 x USB – host and OTG
  • 14-pin ETAG connector
  • 2 x UART, GPIO, SPI, I2C, ADC, expansion headers
  • Power supply

For a chance of receiving a free board, you just need to register and describe the project you want to build. If you are lucky and the company likes the sound of your proposal, you will be one of 1000 entrants to receive a free Creator CI20 development board. For more information go to the Imagination web site and fill out a request form.

Low-Power Remote-Control Transceivers

LinxThe TT Series remote-control transceiver is designed for bidirectional, long-range, remote-control applications. The module includes an optimized frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) RF transceiver and an integrated remote-control transcoder.

The FHSS is capable of reaching more than 2 miles in typical line-of-sight environments with 0-dB gain antennas. An amplified version increases the output power from 12.5 to 23.5 dBm, boosting the range to more than 8 miles in line-of-sight environments with 0-dB antennas.

The TT Series transceiver features best-in-class receive sensitivity (up to −111 dBm) and low power consumption (only 19.2 mA in receive mode and 36 mA in transmit mode at 12.5 dBm). The initial version operates in the 902-to-928-Hz frequency band for North and South America.

The transceiver is housed in a compact reflow-compatible surface-mount technology (SMT) package. It doesn’t require any external RF components except an antenna, which simplifies integration and reduces assembly costs.

Programming is not required for basic operation. The transceiver’s primary settings are hardware-selectable, which eliminates the need for an external microcontroller or other digital interface. Eight status lines can be set up in any combination of inputs and outputs to transfer button or contact states. A selectable acknowledgement indicates that the transmission was successfully received. For advanced features, a UART interface provides optional software configuration.

A simple pairing operation configures two modules to operate together. A single button press on each side causes the modules to automatically swap their 32-bit addresses and store them in nonvolatile memory. It can be configured to automatically send an acknowledgement to the transmitting unit either after receiving a command or with external circuitry when an action has taken place. An optional external processor can send two data bytes with the acknowledgement.

The TT Series transceiver module is available as part of Linx Technologies’s master development system that comes with two development boards for benchmarking and prototyping. Each board is populated with a transceiver, two remote-control development boards, and programming boards. The system also includes antennas, a daughterboard with a USB interface, demonstration software, extra modules, and connectors.

Contact Linx Technologies for pricing.

Linx Technologies
www.linxtechnologies.com

Traveling With a “Portable Workspace”

As a freelance engineer, Raul Alvarez spends a lot of time on the go. He says the last four or five years he has been traveling due to work and family reasons, therefore he never stays in one place long enough to set up a proper workspace. “Whenever I need to move again, I just pack whatever I can: boards, modules, components, cables, and so forth, and then I’m good to go,” he explains.

Raul_Alvarez_Workspace _Photo_1

Alvarez sits at his “current” workstation.

He continued by saying:

In my case, there’s not much of a workspace to show because my workspace is whichever desk I have at hand in a given location. My tools are all the tools that I can fit into my traveling backpack, along with my software tools that are installed in my laptop.

Because in my personal projects I mostly work with microcontroller boards, modular components, and firmware, until now I think it didn’t bother me not having more fancy (and useful) tools such as a bench oscilloscope, a logic analyzer, or a spectrum analyzer. I just try to work with whatever I have at hand because, well, I don’t have much choice.

Given my circumstances, probably the most useful tools I have for debugging embedded hardware and firmware are a good-old UART port, a multimeter, and a bunch of LEDs. For the UART interface I use a Future Technology Devices International FT232-based UART-to-USB interface board and Tera Term serial terminal software.

Currently, I’m working mostly with Microchip Technology PIC and ARM microcontrollers. So for my PIC projects my tiny Microchip Technology PICkit 3 Programmer/Debugger usually saves the day.

Regarding ARM, I generally use some of the new low-cost ARM development boards that include programming/debugging interfaces. I carry an LPC1769 LPCXpresso board, an mbed board, three STMicroelectronics Discovery boards (Cortex-M0, Cortex-M3, and Cortex-M4), my STMicroelectronics STM32 Primer2, three Texas Instruments LaunchPads (the MSP430, the Piccolo, and the Stellaris), and the following Linux boards: two BeagleBoard.org BeagleBones (the gray one and a BeagleBone Black), a Cubieboard, an Odroid-X2, and a Raspberry Pi Model B.

Additionally, I always carry an Arduino UNO, a Digilent chipKIT Max 32 Arduino-compatible board (which I mostly use with MPLAB X IDE and “regular” C language), and a self-made Parallax Propeller microcontroller board. I also have a Wi-Fi 3G TP-LINK TL-WR703N mini router flashed   with OpenWRT that enables me to experiment with Wi-Fi and Ethernet and to tinker with their embedded Linux environment. It also provides me Internet access with the use of a 3G modem.

Raul_Alvarez_Workspace _Photo_2

Not a bad set up for someone on the go. Alvarez’s “portable workstation” includes ICs, resistors, and capacitors, among other things. He says his most useful tools are a UART port, a multimeter, and some LEDs.

In three or four small boxes I carry a lot of sensors, modules, ICs, resistors, capacitors, crystals, jumper cables, breadboard strips, and some DC-DC converter/regulator boards for supplying power to my circuits. I also carry a small video camera for shooting my video tutorials, which I publish from time to time at my website (www.raulalvarez.net). I have installed in my laptop TechSmith’s Camtasia for screen capture and Sony Vegas for editing the final video and audio.

Some IDEs that I have currently installed in my laptop are: LPCXpresso, Texas Instruments’s Code Composer Studio, IAR EW for Renesas RL78 and 8051, Ride7, Keil uVision for ARM, MPLAB X, and the Arduino IDE, among others. For PC coding I have installed Eclipse, MS Visual Studio, GNAT Programming Studio (I like to tinker with Ada from time to time), QT Creator, Python IDLE, MATLAB, and Octave. For schematics and PCB design I mostly use CadSoft’s EAGLE, ExpressPCB, DesignSpark PCB, and sometimes KiCad.

Traveling with my portable rig isn’t particularly pleasant for me. I always get delayed at security and customs checkpoints in airports. I get questioned a lot especially about my circuit boards and prototypes and I almost always have to buy a new set of screwdrivers after arriving at my destination. Luckily for me, my nomad lifestyle is about to come to an end soon and finally I will be able to settle down in my hometown in Cochabamba, Bolivia. The first two things I’m planning to do are to buy a really big workbench and a decent digital oscilloscope.

Alvarez’s article “The Home Energy Gateway: Remotely Control and Monitor Household Devices” appeared in Circuit Cellar’s February issue. For more information about Alvarez, visit his website or follow him on Twitter @RaulAlvarezT.