New Embedded Solution for Debugging FPGAs

Exostiv Labs recently announced that its EXOSTIV solution for Intel FPGAs will be available in December 2016. Providing up to 200,000 times more visibility on an FPGA than other solutions, EXOSTIV enables the debugging and verification of FPGA board prototypes at speed of operation. It provides extended visibility on internal nodes over long periods of time with minimal impact on the FPGA resources. Thus, you can discover issues related to complex interactions between numerous IPs when simulation is impracticable.

EXOSTIV for Intel FPGAs will be released in December 2016 with support for Arria 10 devices first. Pricing starts at $5,100.

Source: Exostiv Labs 

eSOL RTOS & Debugger Support for Software Development

Imperas Software recently announced its support for eSOL’s eMCOS RTOS and eBinder debugger. The partnership is intended to accelerate embedded software development, debugging, and testing.

The Imperas Extendable Platform Kit (EPK) features a Renesas RH850F1H device and it runs the eSOL eMCOS real time operating system. Imperas simulators can use the debugger from the eSOL IDE, eBinder, for efficient software debugging and testing.

Source: eSOL

ARM Tools with Extended Static Analysis and Flash Breakpoints

IAR Systems recently announced an updated version of its C/C++ compiler and debugger toolchain for developing ARM-based embedded applications. IAR Embedded Workbench for ARM Version 7.60 adds flash breakpoints functionality and extended static analysis in C-STAT, which performs an analysis on the source code level. In addition to helping developers in ensuring the code quality early in the development cycle, it also detects defects, bugs, and security vulnerabilities as defined by CERT C/C++ and the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE). It also helps keep code compliant to coding standards such as  MISRA C:2004, MISRA C++:2008, and MISRA C:2012.

C-STAT is fully integrated in the IAR Embedded Workbench IDE. The new update extends the tool with approximately 150 new checks, including 90 new MISRA C:2012 checks and two new packages of checks. Furthermore, there are new options for enabling or disabling the false-positives elimination phase of the analysis and excluding files from the analysis.

The flash breakpoints enable developers to set an unlimited number of breakpoints when debugging the flash memory. With the C-SPY Debugger in IAR Embedded Workbench, you can set various types of breakpoints in the applications you’re debugging. If you use IAR Embedded Workbench with IAR’s I-jet debug probe, you can add an unlimited number of flash breakpoints for selected ARM Cortex-M devices. By setting breakpoints, investigating the status of an application and speeding up the debugging phase is straightforward.

IAR Embedded Workbench for ARM is a handy tool that incorporates a compiler, an assembler, a linker and a debugger into one easy-to-use IDE. It provides advanced and highly efficient optimization features and is tightly integrated with hardware, RTOS products, and middleware. C-STAT is available as an add-on product.

Source: IAR Systems

Small Plug-In Embedded Cellular Modem

Skywire plug-in modem

Skywire plug-in modem

The Skywire is a small plug-in embedded cellular modem. It uses a standard XBee form factor and 1xRTT CDMA operating mode to help developers minimize hardware and network costs. Its U.FL port ensures antenna flexibility.

The Skywire modem features a Telit CE910-DUAL wireless module and is available with bundled CDMA 1xRTT data plans from leading carriers, enabling developers to add fully compliant cellular connectivity without applying for certification. Future versions of the Skywire will support GSM and LTE. Skywire is smaller than many other embedded solutions and simple to deploy due to its bundled carrier service plans.

Skywire is available with a complete development kit that includes the cellular modem, a baseboard, an antenna, a power supply, debug cables, and a cellular service plan. The Skywire baseboard is an Arduino shield, which enables direct connection to an Arduino microcontroller.

Skywire modems cost $129 individually and $99 for 1,000-unit quantities. A complete development kit including the modem costs $262.

NimbeLink, LLC

CC268: The History of Embedded Tech

At the end of September 2012, an enthusiastic crew of electrical engineers and journalists (and significant others) traveled to Portsmouth, NH, from locations as far apart as San Luis Obispo, CA,  and Paris, France, to celebrate Circuit Cellar’s 25th anniversary. Attendees included Don Akkermans (Director, Elektor International Media), Steve Ciarcia (Founder, Circuit Cellar), the current magazine staff, and several well-known engineers, editors, and columnists. The event marked the beginning of the next chapter in the history of this long-revered publication. As you’d expect, contributors and staffers both reminisced about the past and shared ideas about its future. And in many instances, the conversations turned to the content in this issue, which was at that time entering the final phase of production. Why? We purposely designed this issue (and next month’s) to feature a diversity of content that would represent the breadth of coverage we’ve come to deliver during the past quarter century. A quick look at this issue’s topics gives you an idea of how far embedded technology has come. The topics also point to the fact that some of the most popular ’80s-era engineering concerns are as relevant as ever. Let’s review.

In the earliest issues of Circuit Cellar, home control was one of the hottest topics. Today, inventive DIY home control projects are highly coveted by professional engineers and newbies alike. On page 16, Scott Weber presents an interesting GPS-based time server for lighting control applications. An MCU extracts time from GPS data and transmits it to networked devices.

The time-broadcasting device includes a circuit board that’s attached to a GPS module. (Source: S. Weber, CC268)

Thiadmer Riemersma’s DIY automated component dispenser is a contemporary solution to a problem that has frustrated engineers for decades (p. 26). The MCU-based design simplifies component management and will be a welcome addition to any workbench.

The DIY automated component dispenser. (Source: T. Riemersma, CC268)

USB technology started becoming relevant in the mid-to-late 1990s, and since then has become the go-to connection option for designers and end users alike. Turn to page 30 for Jan Axelson’s  tips about debugging USB firmware. Axelson covers controller architectures and details devices such as the FTDI FT232R USB UART controller and Microchip Technology’s PIC18F4550 microcontroller.

Debugging USB firmware (Source: J. Axelson, CC268)

Electrical engineers have been trying to “control time” in various ways since the earliest innovators began studying and experimenting with electric charge. Contemporary timing control systems are implemented in a amazing ways. For instance, Richard Lord built a digital camera controller that enables him to photograph the movement of high-speed objects (p. 36).

Security and product reliability are topics that have been on the minds of engineers for decades. Whether you’re working on aerospace electronics or a compact embedded system for your workbench (p. 52), you’ll want to ensure your data is protected and that you’ve gone through the necessary steps to predict your project’s likely reliability (p. 60).

The issue’s last two articles detail how to use contemporary electronics to improve older mechanical systems. On page 64 George Martin presents a tachometer design you can implement immediately in a machine shop. And lastly, on page 70, Jeff Bachiochi wraps up his series “Mechanical Gyroscope Replacement.” The goal is to transmit reliable data to motor controllers. The photo below shows the Pololu MinIMU-9.

The Pololu MinIMU-9’s sensor axes are aligned with the mechanical gyro so the x and y output pitch and roll, respectively. (Source: J. Bachiochi, CC268)

AC Tester Schematic Update

An error was found in one of the AC tester schematics that ran in Kevin Gorga’s June 2012 article, “AC Tester” (Circuit Cellar 263). As a reader indicated, T2 is disconnected in the published version of the schematic. An edited schematic follows.

Edited version of Figure 2 in K. Gorga’s June 2012 article, “AC Tester” (Source: Paul Alciatore)

The correction is now available on Circuit Cellar‘s Errata, Corrections, & Updates page.