Q&A with Arduino-Based Skube Codesigner

The Arduino-based Skube

The Arduino-based Skube

Andrew Spitz is a Copenhagen, Denmark-based sound designer, interaction designer, and programmer. Among his various innovative projects is the Arduino-based Skube music player, which is an innovative design that enables users to find and share music.

Spitz worked on the design with Andrew Nip, Ruben van der Vleuten, and Malthe Borch. Check out the video to see the Skube in action. On his blog SoundPlusDesign.com, Spitz writes: “It is a fully working prototype through the combination of using ArduinoMax/MSP and an XBee wireless network. We access the Last.fm API to populate the Skube with tracks and scrobble, and using their algorithms to find similar music when in Discover mode.”

Skube – A Last.fm & Spotify Radio from Andrew Nip on Vimeo.

The following is an abridged  version of an interview that appears in the December 2012 issue of audioXpress magazine, a sister publication of Circuit Cellar magazine..

SHANNON BECKER: Tell us a little about your background and where you live.

Andrew Spitz: I’m half French, half South African. I grew up in France, but my parents are South African so when I was 17, I moved to South Africa. Last year, I decided to go back to school, and I’m now based in Copenhagen, Denmark where I’m earning a master’s degree at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design (CID).

SHANNON: How did you become interested in sound design? Tell us about some of your initial projects.

Andrew: From the age of 16, I was a skydiving cameraman and I was obsessed with filming. So when it was time to do my undergraduate work, I decided to study film. I went to film school thinking that I would be doing cinematography, but I’m color blind and it turned out to be a bigger problem than I had hoped. At the same time, we had a lecturer in sound design named Jahn Beukes who was incredibly inspiring, and I discovered a passion for sound that has stayed with me.

Shannon: What do your interaction design studies at CIID entail? What do you plan to do with the additional education?

Andrew: CIID is focused on a user-centered approach to design, which involves finding intuitive solutions for products, software, and services using mostly technology as our medium. What this means in reality is that we spend a lot of time playing, hacking, prototyping, and basically building interactive things and experiences of some sort.

I’ve really committed to the shift from sound design to interaction design and it’s now my main focus. That said, I feel like I look at design from the lens of a sound designer as this is my background and what has formed me. Many designers around me are very visual, and I feel like my background gives me not only a different approach to the work but also enables me to see opportunities using sound as the catalyst for interactive experiences. Lots of my recent projects have been set in the intersection among technology, sound, and people.

SHANNON: You have worked as a sound effects recordist and editor, location recordist and sound designer for commercials, feature films, and documentaries. Tell us about some of these experiences?

ANDREW: I love all aspects of sound for different reasons. Because I do a lot of things and don’t focus on one, I end up having more of a general set of skills than going deep with one—this fits my personality very well. By doing different jobs within sound, I was able to have lots of different experiences, which I loved! nLocation recording enabled me to see really interesting things—from blowing up armored vehicles with rocket-propelled grenades (RPGs) to interviewing famous artists and presidents. And, documentaries enabled me to travel to amazing places such as Rwanda, Liberia, Mexico, and Nigeria. As a sound effects recordist on Jock of the Bushvelt, a 3-D animation, I recorded animals such as lions, baboons, and leopards in the South African bush. With Bakgat 2, I spent my time recording and editing rugby sounds to create a sound effects library. This time in my life has been a huge highlight, but I couldn’t see myself doing this forever. I love technology and design, which is why I made the move...

SHANNON: Where did the idea for Skube originate?

Andrew: Skube came out of the Tangible User Interface (TUI) class at CIID where we were tasked to rethink audio in the home context. So understanding how and where people share music was the jumping-off point for creating Skube.

We realized that as we move more toward a digital and online music listening experience, current portable music players are not adapted for this environment. Sharing mSkube Videousic in communal spaces is neither convenient nor easy, especially when we all have such different taste in music.

The result of our exploration was Skube. It is a music player that enables you to discover and share music and facilitates the decision process of picking tracks when in a communal setting.

audioXpress is an Elektor International Media publication.

Pulse-Shaping Basics

Pulse shaping (i.e., base-band filtering) can vastly improve the behavior of wired or wireless communication links in an electrical system. With that in mind, Circuit Cellar columnist Robert Lacoste explains the advantages of filtering and examines Fourier transforms; random non-return-to-zero NRZ signaling; and low-pass, Gaussian, Nyquist, and raised-cosine filters.

Lacoste’s article, which appears in Circuit Cellar’s April 2014 issue, includes an abundance of graphic simulations created with Scilab Enterprises’s open-source software. The simulations will help readers grasp the details of pulse shaping, even if they aren’t math experts. (Note: You can download the Scilab source files Lacoste developed for his article from Circuit Cellar’s FTP site.)

Excerpts from Lacoste’s article below explain the importance of filtering and provide a closer look at low-pass filters:

WHY FILTERING?
I’ll begin with an example. Imagine you have a 1-Mbps continuous digital signal you need to transmit between two points. You don’t want to specifically encode these bits; you just want to transfer them one by one as they are.

Before transmission, you will need to transform the 1 and 0s into an actual analog signal any way you like. You can use a straightforward method. Simply define a pair of voltages (e.g., 0 and 5 V) and put 0 V on the line for a 0-level bit and put 5 V on the line for a 1-level bit.


This method is pedantically called non-return-to-zero (NRZ). This is exactly what a TTL UART is doing; there is nothing new here. This analog signal (i.e., the base-band signal) can then be sent through the transmission channel and received at the other end (see top image in Figure 1).


Note: In this article I am not considering any specific transmission channel. It could range from a simple pair of copper wires to elaborate wireless links using amplitude, frequency and/or phase modulation, power line modems, or even optical links. Everything I will discuss will basically be applicable to any kind of transmission as it is linked to the base-band signal encoding prior to any modulation.

Directly transmitting a raw digital signal, such as this 1-Mbps non-return-to-zero (NRZ) stream (at top), is a waste of bandwidth. b—Using a pulse-shaping filter (bottom) reduces the required bandwidth for the same bit rate, but with a risk of increased transmission errors.

Figure 1: Directly transmitting a raw digital signal, such as this 1-Mbps non-return-to-zero (NRZ) stream (top), is a waste of bandwidth. Using a pulse-shaping filter (bottom) reduces the required bandwidth for the same bit rate, but with a risk of increased transmission errors.


Now, what is the issue when using simple 0/5-V NRZ encoding? Bandwidth efficiency. You will use more megahertz than needed for your 1-Mbps signal transmission. This may not be an issue if the channel has plenty of extra capacity (e.g., if you are using a Category 6 1-Gbps-compliant shielded twisted pair cable to transmit these 1 Mbps over a couple of meters).


Unfortunately, in real life you will often need to optimize the bandwidth. This could be for cost reasons, for environmental concerns (e.g., EMC perturbations), for regulatory issues (e.g., RF channelization), or simply to increase the effective bit rate as much as possible for a given channel.


Therefore, a good engineering practice is to use just the required bandwidth through a pulse-shaping filter. This filter is fitted between your data source and the transmitter (see bottom of Figure 1).


The filter’s goal is to reduce as much as possible the occupied bandwidth of your base-band signal without affecting the system performance in terms of bit error rate. These may seem like contradictory requirements. How can you design such a filter? That’s what I will try to explain in this article….


LOW-PASS FILTERS

A base-band filter is needed between the binary signal source and the transmission media or modulator. But what characteristics should this filter include? It must attenuate as quickly as possible the unnecessary high frequencies. But it must also enable the receiver to decode the signal without errors, or more exactly without more errors than specified. You will need a low-pass filter to limit the high frequencies. As a first example, I used a classic Butterworth second-order filter with varying cut-off frequencies to make the simulation. Figure 2 shows the results. Let me explain the graphs.

Figure 2: This random non-return-to-zero (NRZ) signal (top row) was passed through a second-order Butterworth low-pass filter. When the cut-off frequency is low (310 kHz), the filtered signal (middle row) is distorted and the eye diagram is closed. With a higher cutoff (410 kHz, bottom row), the intersymbol interference (ISI) is lower but the frequency content is visible up to 2 MHz.

Figure 2: This random non-return-to-zero (NRZ) signal (top row) was passed through a second-order Butterworth low-pass filter. When the cut-off frequency is low (310 kHz), the filtered signal (middle row) is distorted and the eye diagram is closed. With a higher cutoff (410 kHz, bottom row), the intersymbol interference (ISI) is lower but the frequency content is visible up to 2 MHz.

The leftmost column shows the signal frequency spectrum after filtering with the filter frequency response in red as a reference. The middle column shows a couple of bits of the filtered signal (i.e., in the time domain), as if you were using an oscilloscope. Last, the rightmost column shows the received signal’s so-called “eye pattern.” This may seem impressive, but the concept is very simple.

Imagine you have an oscilloscope. Trigger it on any rising or falling front of the signal, scale the display to show one bit time in the middle of the screen, and accumulate plenty of random bits on the screen. You’ve got the eye diagram. It provides a visual representation of the difficulty the receiver will have to recover the bits. The more “open” the eye, the easier it is. Moreover, if the successive bits’ trajectories don’t superpose to each other, there is a kind of memory effect. The voltage for a given bit varies depending on the previously transmitted bits. This phenomenon is called intersymbol interference (ISI) and it makes life significantly more difficult for decoding.


Take another look at the Butterworth filter simulations. The first line is the unfiltered signal as a reference (see Figure 2, top row). The second line with a 3-dB, 310-kHz cut-off frequency shows a frequency spectrum significantly reduced after 1 MHz but with a high level of ISI. The eye diagram is nearly closed (see Figure 2, middle row). The third line shows the result with a 410-kHz Butterworth low-pass filter (see Figure 2, bottom row). Its ISI is significantly lower, even if it is still visible. (The successive spot trajectories don’t pass through the same single point.) Anyway, the frequency spectrum is far cleaner than the raw signal, at least from 2 MHz.

Lacoste’s article serves as solid introduction to the broad subject of pulse-shaping. And it concludes by re-emphasizing a few important points and additional resources for readers:

Transmitting a raw digital signal on any medium is a waste of bandwidth. A filter can drastically improve the performance. However, this filter must be well designed to minimize intersymbol interference.

The ideal solution, namely the Nyquist filter, enables you to restrict the used spectrum to half the transmitted bit rate. However, this filter is just a mathematician’s dream. Raised cosine filters and Gaussian filters are two classes of real-life filters that can provide an adequate complexity vs performance ratio.

At least you will no longer be surprised if you see references to such filters in electronic parts’ datasheets. As an example, see Figure 3, which is a block diagram of Analog Devices’s ADF7021 high-performance RF transceiver.

This is a block diagram of Analog Devices’s ADF7021 high-performance transceiver. On the bottom right there is a “Gaussian/raised cosine filter” block, which is a key factor in efficient RF bandwidth usage.

Figure 3: This is a block diagram of Analog Devices’s ADF7021 high-performance transceiver. On the bottom right there is a “Gaussian/raised cosine filter” block, which is a key factor in efficient RF bandwidth usage.

The subject is not easy and can be easily misunderstood. I hope this article will encourage you to learn more about the subject. Bernard Sklar’s book Digital Communications: Fundamentals and Applications is a good reference. Playing with simulations is also a good way to understand, so don’t hesitate to read and modify the Scilab examples I provided for you on Circuit Cellar’s FTP site.  

Lacoste’s full article is in the April issue, now available for membership download or single issue purchase. And for more information about improving the efficiency of wireless communication links, check out Lacoste’s 2011 article “Line-Coding Techniques,” Circuit Cellar 255, which tells you how you can encode your bits before transmission.

Wireless Data Links (Part 2): Transmitters and Antennas

If you built your own ham radio “back in the day,” you’ll recall the frustration of putting it together with components that were basic at best.

But as columnist George Novacek points out in the second installment of his series examining wireless data links: “Today you can purchase excellent, reasonably priced low-power gear for data communications off the shelf.”

Transmitter and receiver

Photo 1: SparkFun Electronics’s WRL-10524 transmitter and WRL-10532 receiver are low cost, basic, and work well.

Part 2 of Novacek’s series, appearing in the March issue, looks at transmitters and antennas.

In one section, Novacek expands upon the five basic data-transmitter modules—a data encoder, a modulator, a carrier frequency generator, an RF output amplifier, and an antenna:

Low-power data transmitters often integrate the modulator, the carrier frequency generator, and the amplifier into one circuit. A single transistor can do the job. I’ll discuss antennas later. When a transmitter and a receiver are combined into one unit, it’s called a transceiver.

Modulation may not be needed in some simple applications where the mere presence of a carrier is detected to initiate an action. A simple push button will suffice, but this is rarely used as it is subject to false triggering by other transmitters working in the area in the same frequency band.

Digital encoder and decoder ICs are available for simple devices (e.g., garage door openers) or keyless entry where just an on or off output is required from the receiver. These ICs generate a data packet for transmission. If the received packet matches the data stored in the decoder, an action is initiated. Typical examples include Holtek Semiconductor HT12E encoders and HT12D decoders and Freescale Semiconductor MC145026, MC145027, and MC145028 encoder and decoder pairs. For data communications a similar but more advanced scheme is used. I’ll address this when I discuss receivers (coming up in Part 3 of this series).

Novacek’s column goes on to explain modulation types, including OOK and ASK modulation:

OOK modulation is achieved by feeding the Data In line with a 0-to+V-level  datastream. ASK modulation can be achieved by the data varying the transistor biasing to swing the RF output between 100% and typically 30% to 50% amplitude. I prefer to add a separate modulator.

The advantage of ASK as opposed to OOK modulation is that the carrier is always present, thus the receiver is not required to repeatedly synchronize to it. Different manufacturers’ specifications claim substantially higher achievable data rates with ASK rather than OOK.

For instance, Photo 1 shows a SparkFun Electronics WRL-10534 transmitter and a WRL-10532 receiver set for 433.9 MHz (a 315-MHz set is also available), which costs less than $10. It is a bare-bones design, but it works well. When you build supporting circuits around it you can get excellent results. The set is a good starting point for experimentation.

The article also includes tips on a transceiver you can purchase to save time in developing ancillary circuits (XBee), while noting a variety of transceiver, receiver, and transmitter modules are available from manufacturers such as Maxim Integrated, Micrel, and RF Monolithics (RFM).  In addition, the article discusses design and optimization of the three forms of antennas: a straight conductor (monopole), a coil (helical), and a loop.

“These can be external, internal, or even etched onto the PCB (e.g., keyless entry fobs) to minimize the size,” Novacek says.

Do you need advice on what to consider when choosing an antenna for your design?  Find these tips and more in Novacek’s March issue article.

Wireless Data Links (Part 1)

In Circuit Cellar’s February issue, the Consummate Engineer column launches a multi-part series on wireless data links.

“Over the last two decades, wireless data communication devices have been entering the realm of embedded control,” columnist George Novacek says in Part 1 of the series. “The technology to produce reasonably priced, reliable, wireless data links is now available off the shelf and no longer requires specialized knowledge, experience, and exotic, expensive test equipment. Nevertheless, to use wireless devices effectively, an engineer should understand the principles involved.”

Radio communicationsPart 1 focuses on radio communications, in particular low-power, data-carrying wireless links used in control systems.

“Even with this limitation, it is a vast subject, the surface of which can merely be scratched,” Novacek says. “Today, we can purchase ready-made, low-power, reliable radio interface modules with excellent performance for an incredibly low price. These devices were originally developed for noncritical applications (e.g., garage door openers, security systems, keyless entry, etc.). Now they are making inroads into control systems, mostly for remote sensing and computer network data exchange. Wireless devices are already present in safety-related systems (e.g., remote tire pressure monitoring), to say nothing about their bigger and older siblings in remote control of space and military unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).”

An engineering audience will find Novacek’s article a helpful overview of fundamental wireless communications principles and topics, including RF circuitry (e.g., inductor/capacitor, or LC, circuits), ceramic surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators, frequency response, bandwidth, sensitivity, noise issues, and more.

Here is an article excerpt about bandwidth and achieving its ideal, rectangular shape:

“The bandwidth affects receiver selectivity and/or a transmitter output spectral purity. The selectivity is the ability of a radio receiver to reject all but the desired signal. Narrowing the bandwidth makes it possible to place more transmitters within the available frequency band. It also lowers the received noise level and increases the selectivity due to its higher Q. On the other hand, transmission of every signal but a non-modulated, pure sinusoid carrier—which, therefore, contains no information—requires a certain minimum bandwidth. The required bandwidth is determined by the type of modulation and the maximum modulating frequency.

“For example, AM radios carry maximum 5-kHz audio and, consequently, need 10-kHz bandwidth to accommodate the carrier with its two 5-kHz sidebands. Therefore, AM broadcast stations have to be spaced a minimum of 20 kHz apart. However, narrowing the bandwidth will lead to the loss of parts of the transmitted information. In a data-carrying systems, it will cause a gradual increase of the bit error rate (BER) until the data becomes useless. At that point, the bandwidth must be increased or the baud rate must be decreased to maintain reliable communications.

“An ideal bandwidth would have a shape of a rectangle, as shown in Figure 1 by the blue trace. Achieving this to a high degree with LC circuits can get quite complicated, but ceramic resonators used in modern receivers can deliver excellent, near ideal results.”

Figure 1: This is the frequency response and bandwidth of a parallel resonant LC circuit. A series circuit graph would be inverted.

Figure 1: This is the frequency response and bandwidth of a parallel resonant LC circuit. A series circuit graph would be inverted.

To learn more about control-system wireless links, check out the February issue now available for membership download or single-issue purchase. Part 2 in Novacek’s series discusses transmitters and antennas and will appear in our March issue.

Web-Based Remote I/O Control

The RIO-2010 is a web-based remote I/O control module. The Ethernet-ready module is equipped with eight relays, 16 photo-isolated digital inputs, and a 1-Wire interface for digital temperature sensor connection. The RIO-2010’s built-in web server enables you to access the I/O and use a standard web browser to remotely control the RIO-2010’s relay.

The RIO-2010 can be easily integrated into supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and industrial automation systems using the standard Modbus TCP protocol. The I/O module also comes with RS-485 serial interface for applications requiring Modbus RTU/ASCII. Its built-in web server enables you to use standard web-editing tools and Ajax dynamic page technology to customize your webpage.

Contact Artila for pricing.

Artila Electronics Co., Ltd.
www.artila.com