Flexible I/O Expansion for Rugged Applications

WynSystemsThe SBC35-CC405 series of multi-core embedded PCs includes on-board USB, gigabit Ethernet, and serial ports. These industrial computers are designed for rugged embedded applications requiring extended temperature operation and long-term availability.

The SBC35-CC405 series features the latest generation Intel Atom E3800 family of processors in an industry-standard 3.5” single-board computer (SBC) format COM Express carrier. A Type 6 COM Express module supporting a quad-, dual-, or single-core processor is used to integrate the computer. For networking and communications, the SBC35-CC405 includes two Intel I210 gigabit Ethernet controllers with IEEE 1588 timestamping and 10-/100-/1,000-Mbps multispeed operation. Four Type-A connectors support three USB 2.0 channels and one high-speed USB 3.0 channel. Two serial ports support RS-232/-422/-485 interface levels with clock options up to 20 Mbps in the RS-422/-485 mode and up to 1 Mbps in the RS-232 mode.

The SBC35-CC405 series also includes two MiniPCIe connectors and one IO60 connector to enable additional I/O expansion. Both MiniPCIe connectors support half-length and full-length cards with screw-down mounting for improved shock and vibration durability. One MiniPCIe connector also supports bootable mSATA solid-state disks while the other connector includes USB. The IO60 connector provides access to the I2C, SPI, PWM, and UART signals enabling a simple interface to sensors, data acquisition, and other low-speed I/O devices.

The SBC35-CC405 runs over a 10-to-50-VDC input power range and operates at temperatures from –40°C to 85°C. Enclosures, power supplies, and configuration services are also available.

Linux, Windows, and other x86 OSes can be booted from the CFast, mSATA, SATA, or USB interfaces, providing flexible data storage options. WinSystems provides drivers for Linux and Windows 7/8 as well as preconfigured embedded OSes.
The single-core SBC35-CC405 costs $499.

Winsystems, Inc.
www.winsystems.com

Integrated Wi-Fi System in Package Module

EconaisThe EC19W01 is a small, smart, highly integrated 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi system in package (SiP) module. The module is well suited for home automation and smart appliances; Wi-Fi audio speakers and headphones; wireless sensors and sensor networks; wireless monitoring (audio and video); smart appliances; health care and fitness devices; wearable devices; security, authentication, and admittance control; lighting; building/energy/industrial management/control; cloud-connected devices; remote control, data acquisition, and monitoring; and machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) design.

The EC19W01’s features include an integrated 32-bit processor to support application customization, on-board flash and antenna, low power consumption, support for Serial-to-Wi-Fi and SPI-to-Wi-Fi, wireless transmit/receive rates of up to 20 Mbps, and a small 14-mm × 16-mm × 2.8-mm footprint.

Contact Econais for pricing.

Econais, Inc.
www.econais.com

PC-Programmable Temperature Controller

Oven Industries 5R7-388 temperature controller

Oven Industries 5R7-388 temperature controller

The 5R7-388 is a bidirectional temperature controller. It can be used in independent thermoelectric modules or in conjunction with auxiliary or supplemental resistive heaters for cooling and heating applications. The solid-state MOSFET output devices’ H-bridge configuration enables the bidirectional current flow through the thermoelectric modules.
The RoHS-compliant controller is PC programmable via an RS-232 communication port, so it can directly interface with a compatible PC. It features an easily accessible communications link that enables various operational mode configurations. The 5R7-388 can perform field-selectable parameters or data acquisition in a half duplex mode.

In accordance with RS-232 interface specifications, the controller accepts a communications cable length. Once the desired set parameters are established, the PC may be disconnected and the 5R7-388 becomes a unique, stand-alone controller. All parameter settings are retained in nonvolatile memory. The 5R7-388’s additional features include 36-VDC output using split supply, a PC-configurable alarm circuit, and P, I, D, or On/Off control.

Contact Oven Industries for pricing.

Oven Industries, Inc.
www.ovenind.com

Data Acquisition Instrument

The DI-145 USB data acquisition instrument features four ±100-V analog channels and two dedicated digital inputs. The included DATAQ WinDaq data acquisition software (DAS) enables you to display and record data to a PC hard drive in real time. Once recorded, data can be played back, analyzed, or exported to an array of data acquisition and spreadsheet formats.

DATAQ also provides access to the DI-145 data protocol, which enables access to the DI-145 on any Windows, Linux, or MAC OS. In addition, .NET control is available to Windows users who wish to use a third-party programming language (e.g., Microsoft’s Visual Basic or National Instruments’s LabVIEW) to interface with the DI-145.

The four ±10-V fixed differential channels are protected from transient spikes up to ±150 V peak (±75 V, continuous). A 10-bit ADC provides 19.5-mV resolution across the full-scale measurement range. Digital inputs are protected up to ±30 VDC/peak AC. The digital inputs enable you to use a switch closure or TTL signal to remotely insert event marks or record data to disk.

The DI-145 measures 1.53” × 2.625” × 5.5” (3.89 cm × 6.67 cm × 13.97 cm) and weighs 3.6 oz. The data acquisition instrument costs $29 and includes a mini screwdriver, a USB cable, WinDaq/Lite DAS, access to the data protocol, and .NET control.

DATAQ Instruments, Inc.
www.dataq.com

Embedded Sensor Innovation at MIT

During his June 5 keynote address at they 2013 Sensors Expo in Chicago, Joseph Paradiso presented details about some of the innovative embedded sensor-related projects at the MIT Media Lab, where he is the  Director of the Responsive Environments Group. The projects he described ranged from innovative ubiquitous computing installations for monitoring building utilities to a small sensor network that transmits real-time data from a peat bog in rural Massachusetts. Below I detail a few of the projects Paradiso covered in his speech.

DoppleLab

Managed by the Responsive Enviroments group, the DoppelLab is a virtual environment that uses Unity 3D to present real-time data from numerous sensors in MIT Media Lab complex.

The MIT Responsive Environments Group’s DoppleLab

Paradiso explained that the system gathers real-time information and presents it via an interactive browser. Users can monitor room temperature, humidity data, RFID badge movement, and even someone’s Tweets has he moves throughout the complex.

Living Observatory

Paradiso demoed the Living Observatory project, which comprises numerous sensor nodes installed in a peat bog near Plymouth, MA. In addition to transmitting audio from the bog, the installation also logs data such as temperature, humidity, light, barometric pressure, and radio signal strength. The data logs are posted on the project site, where you can also listen to the audio transmission.

The Living Observatory (Source: http://tidmarsh.media.mit.edu/)

GesturesEverywhere

The GesturesEverywhere project provides a real-time data stream about human activity levels within the MIT Media Lab. It provides the following data and more:

  • Activity Level: you can see the Media Labs activity level over a seven-day period.
  • Presence Data: you can see the location of ID tags as people move in the building

The following video is a tracking demo posted on the project site.

The aforementioned projects are just a few of the many cutting-edge developments at the MIT Media Lab. Paradiso said the projects show how far ubiquitous computing technology has come. And they provide a glimpse into the future. For instance, these technologies lend themselves to a variety of building-, environment-, and comfort-related applications.

“In the early days of ubiquitous computing, it was all healthcare,” Paradiso said. “The next frontier is obviously energy.”