Raspberry Pi IoT SBC Leverages Cypress Wi-Fi/Bluetooth SoC

Cypress Semiconductor has announced its Wi-Fi and Bluetooth combo solution is used on the new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ IoT single board computer. The Cypress CYW43455 single-chip combo provides high-performance 802.11ac Wi-Fi for faster Internet connections, advanced coexistence algorithms for simultaneous Bluetooth and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) operations such as audio and video streaming, and low-power BLE connections to smartphones, sensors and Bluetooth Mesh networks. The combo’s high-speed 802.11ac transmissions enable superior network performance, faster downloads and better range, as well as lower power consumption by quickly exploiting deep sleep modes. The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ board builds on the success of existing Raspberry Pi solutions using Cypress’ CYW43438 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth combo SoC.

Wi-Fi networks powered by 802.11ac simultaneously deliver low-latency and high-speed with secure device communication, making it the ideal wireless technology for connecting products directly to the cloud. The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ board with the highly-integrated Cypress CYW43455 combo SoC allows developers to quickly prototype industrial IoT systems and smart home products that leverage the benefits of 802.11ac.

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ board features a 64-bit, quad-core processor running at 1.4 GHz, 1 GB RAM, full size HDMI, 4 standard USB ports, Gbit Ethernet over USB2, Power over Ethernet capability, CSI camera connector and a DSI display connector. The platform’s resources, together with its 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth/BLE wireless connectivity, provide a compact solution for intelligent edge-connected devices.

The Cypress CYW43455 SoC features a dual-band 2.4- and 5-GHz radio with 20-, 40- and 80-MHz channels with up to 433 Mbps performance. This fast 802.11ac throughput allows devices to get on and off of the network more quickly, preventing network congestion and prolonging battery life by letting devices spend more time in deep sleep modes. The SoC includes Linux open source Full Media Access Control (FMAC) driver support with enterprise and industrial features enabled, including security, roaming, voice and locationing.

Cypress’ CYW43455 SoC and other solutions support Bluetooth Mesh networks—low-cost, low-power mesh network of devices that can communicate with each other, and with smartphones, tablets and voice-controlled home assistants, via simple, secure and ubiquitous Bluetooth connectivity. Bluetooth Mesh enables battery-powered devices within the network to communicate with each other to easily provide coverage throughout even the largest homes, allowing a user to conveniently control all of the devices from the palm of their hand. The SoC is also supported in Cypress’ all-inclusive, turnkey Wireless Internet Connectivity for Embedded Devices (WICED) software development kit (SDK), which streamlines the integration of wireless technologies for IoT developers.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

Raspberry Pi Foundation | www.raspberrypi.org

March Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The March issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. And we’ve got a healthy serving of embedded electronics articles for you. Here’s a sneak peak.

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Here’s a sneak preview of March 2018 Circuit Cellar:

TECHNOLOGY FOR THE INTERNET-OF-THINGS

IoT: From Device to Gateway
The Internet of Things (IoT) is one of the most dynamic areas of embedded systems design today. This feature focuses on the technologies and products from edge IoT devices up to IoT gateways. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child examines the wireless technologies, sensors, edge devices and IoT gateway technologies at the center of this phenomenon.

Texting and IoT Embedded Devices
Texting has become a huge part of our daily lives. But can texting be leveraged for use in IoT Wi-Fi devices? Jeff Bachiochi lays the groundwork for describing a project that will involve texting. In this part, he gets into out the details for getting started with a look at Espressif System’s ESP8266EX SoC.

Exploring the ESP32’s Peripheral Blocks
What makes an embedded processor suitable as an IoT or home control device? Wi-Fi support is just part of the picture. Brian Millier has done some Wi-Fi projects using the ESP32, so here he shares his insights about the peripherals on the ESP32 and why they’re so powerful.

MICROCONTROLLERS HERE, THERE & EVERYWHERE

Designing a Home Cleaning Robot (Part 4)
In this final part of his four-part article series about building a home cleaning robot, Nishant Mittal discusses the firmware part of the system and gets into the system’s actual operation. The robot is based on Cypress Semiconductor’s PSoC microcontroller.

Apartment Entry System Uses PIC32
Learn how a Cornell undergraduate built a system that enables an apartment resident to enter when keys are lost or to grant access to a guest when there’s no one home. The system consists of a microphone connected to a Microchip PIC32 MCU that controls a push solenoid to actuate the unlock button.

Posture Corrector Leverages Bluetooth
Learn how these Cornell students built a posture corrector that helps remind you to sit up straight. Using vibration and visual cues, this wearable device is paired with a phone app and makes use of Bluetooth and Microchip PIC32 technology.

INTERACTING WITH THE ANALOG WORLD

Product Focus: ADCs and DACs
Makers of analog ICs are constantly evolving their DAC and ADC chips pushing the barriers of resolution and speeds. This new Product Focus section updates readers on this technology and provides a product album of representative ADC and DAC products.

Stepper Motor Waveforms
Using inexpensive microcontrollers, motor drivers, stepper motors and other hardware, columnist Ed Nisley built himself a Computer Numeric Control (CNC) machines. In this article Ed examines how the CNC’s stepper motors perform, then pushes one well beyond its normal limits.

Measuring Acceleration
Sensors are a fundamental part of what make smart machines smart. And accelerometers are one of the most important of these. In this article, George Novacek examines the principles behind accelerometers and how the technology works.

SOFTWARE TOOLS AND PROTOTYPING

Trace and Code Coverage Tools
Today it’s not uncommon for embedded devices to have millions of lines of software code. Trace and code coverage tools have kept pace with these demands making it easier for embedded developers to analyze, debug and verify complex embedded software. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest technology trends and product developments in trace and code coverage tools.

Manual Pick-n-Place Assembly Helper
Prototyping embedded systems is an important part of the development cycle. In this article, Colin O’Flynn presents an open-source tool that helps you assemble prototype devices by making the placement process even easier.

Designing a Home Cleaning Robot (Part 2)

Part 2: Mechanical Design

Continuing with this four-part article series about building a home cleaning robot, Nishant and Jesudasan discuss the mechanical aspects of the design.

By Nishant Mittal and Jesudasan Moses
Cypress Semiconductor

In part one (Circuit Cellar 329, December 2017) of this home cleaning robot article series, I discussed the introduction to the concepts of cleaning robots and the crucial design elements that are part of a skeleton design. Apart from that I discussed various selection criteria of the components. In this part, with the help of my colleague Jesudasan Moses, I’ll explore the mechanical aspects of the design. This includes selecting materials, aligning all the components on base, designing the pulleys for optimal performance, selecting motors and so on. The mechanical design for such a system can be very challenging because it’s a moving system and that adds complexity to the process. While this part is focused on mechanical issues and making the base ready, all this paves the way for when we add the “brains” into the system in part three.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Figure 1 shows the block diagram of the mechanical design for this project. The overall structure of this design requires a base that is strong, but not too heavy. Using a metal base isn’t a good option for this type of system because it would increase the overall weight. Such an increase might mean that a higher torque motor would be required. The next elements are the motors and wheels. We chose to include motors only in the back. Using a front motor would probably be an overdesign for such a system. If you examine professionally designed home cleaning robots—like those I covered in part one—all of them had only the back motors for movement.

Figure 1
Mechanical arrangement of the home cleaning robot

On the front side of the unit, only rollers are added. This gives the system a complete 360-degree freedom of movement. The most important parts of the system are the cleaner and the roller. These are placed toward the center of the system and are controlled using an arrangement of motors and pulleys. In the front of the system, side brushes are added that again are controlled using motors. Now let’s look at the selection of each of the design elements.

Selection of the base shape: The base shape selection is very important because it defines how efficiently your home cleaning robot can clean at corners. A circular base shape is the most recommended option. A circular base enables the robot to move around corners and thereby cover each and every part of the house. That said, for a hobby project like this one, a rectangular base means no advanced tools are needed to cut and shape the base. With that in mind, we chose to use an acrylic material in a square shape for the base.

Motor selection: For our design, we opted for two movement motors on the back of the unit and another motor at the back for the roller pulley. On the front, there are two more motors to move the side brushes. We’ll save the more technical discussion about motor selection in part three. Choice of motor size depends upon the total weight that the front and back need to handle. The total weight should be equalized, otherwise the system won’t remain stable when the robot is moving fast. The placement of the two movement motors should be aligned to their center of axis. That ensures that when the robot is moving straight, it won’t divert its direction. It’s also important to buy those two motors from the same vendor to make sure they share the same mechanical properties.

Wheel Selection: It’s very important to decide on the net height of the system early on. Wheel selection is the deciding factor for the net height. .

Read the full article in the January 330 issue of Circuit Cellar

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Note: We’ve made the October 2017 issue of Circuit Cellar available as a free sample issue. In it, you’ll find a rich variety of the kinds of articles and information that exemplify a typical issue of the current magazine.

January Circuit Cellar: Sneak Preview

The January issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is coming soon. And it’s got a robust selection of embedded electronics articles for you. Here’s a sneak peak.

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Here’s a sneak preview of January 2018 Circuit Cellar:

 

                                     IMPROVING EMBEDDED SYSTEM DESIGNS

Special Feature: Powering Commercial Drones
The amount of power a commercial drone can draw on has a direct effect on how long it can stay flying as well as on what tasks it can perform. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child examines solar cells, fuel cells and other technology options for powering commercial drones.

CC 330 CoverFPGA Design: A Fresh Take
Although FPGAs are well established technology, many embedded systems developers—particularly those used the microcontroller realm—have never used them before. In this article, Faiz Rahman takes a fresh look a FPGAs for those new to designing them into their embedded systems.

Product Focus: COM Express boards
COM Express boards provide a complete computing core that can be upgraded when needed, leaving the application-specific I/O on the baseboard. This brand new Product Focus section updates readers on this technology and provides a product album of representative COM Express products.

TESTING, TESTING, 1, 2, 3

LF Resonator Filter
In Ed Nisley’s November column he described how an Arduino-based tester automatically measures a resonator’s frequency response to produce data defining its electrical parameters. This time he examines the resultsand explains a tester modification to measure the resonator’s response with a variable series capacitance.

Technology Spotlight: 5G Technology and Testing
The technologies that are enabling 5G communications are creating new challenges for embedded system developers. Circuit Cellar Chief Editor Jeff Child explores the latest digital and analog ICs aimed at 5G and at the test equipment designed to work with 5G technology.

                                     MICROCONTROLLERS IN EVERYTHING

MCU-based Platform Stabilizer
Using an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), two 180-degree rotation servos and a Microchip PCI MCU, three Cornell students implemented a microcontroller-based platform stabilizer. Learn how they used a pre-programmed sensor fusion algorithm and I2C to get the most out of their design.

Designing a Home Cleaning Robot (Part 2)
Continuing on with this four-part article series about building a home cleaning robot, Nishant Mittal this time discusses the mechanical aspect of the design. The robot is based on Cypress Semiconductor’s PSoC microcontroller.

Massage Vest Uses PIC32 MCU
Microcontrollers are being used for all kinds of things these days. Learn how three Cornell graduates designed a low-cost massage vest that pairs seamlessly with a custom iOS app. Using the Microchip PIC32 for its brains, the massage vest has sixteen vibration motors that the user can control to create the best massage possible.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS:

Five Fault Injection Attacks
Colin O’Flynn returns to the topic of fault injection security attacks. To kick off 2018, he summarizes information about five different fault injection attack stories from 2017—attacks you should be thinking about as an embedded designer.

Money Sorting Machines (Part 2)
In part 1, Jeff Bachiochi delved into the interesting world of money sort machines and their evolution. In part 2, he discusses more details about his coin sorting project. He then looks at a typical bill validator implementation used in vending systems.

Overstress Protection
Last month George Novacek reviewed the causes and results of electrical overstress (EOS). Picking up where that left off, in this article he looks at how to prevent EOS/ESD induced damage—starting with choosing properly rated components.

Tools for Cypress Semi’s PSoC BLE 6 MCU

Cypress Semiconductor has announced the public release of the PSoC 6 BLE Pioneer Kit and PSoC Creator Integrated Design Environment (IDE) software version 4.2 that enable designers to begin development with the PSoC 6 microcontroller (MCU) for IoT applications. PSoC BLE 6 is the industry’s lowest power, most flexible MCU with built-in Bluetooth Low Energy wireless connectivity and integrated hardware-based security in a single device.

Early adopters are already using the flexible dual-core architecture of PSoC 6, using the ARM Cortex-M4 core as a host processor and the Cortex-M0+ core to manage peripheral functions such as capacitive sensing, Bluetooth Low Energy connectivity and sensor aggregation. Early adopter applications include wearables, personal medical devices and wireless speakers. Designers are also utilizing the built-in security features in PSoC 6 to help guard against unwanted access to data.

CY8CKIT-062-BLEThe PSoC BLE Pioneer Kit features a PSoC 63 MCU with Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) connectivity. The kit enables development of modern touch and gesture-based interfaces that are robust and reliable with a linear slider, touch buttons and proximity sensors based on the latest generation of Cypress’ industry-leading CapSense capacitive-sensing technology. Designers can also use the board to add USB Power Delivery (PD) with its Cypress EZ-PD CCG3 USB-C controller. The kit also includes a 2.7-inch E-ink Display Shield add-on board (CY8CKIT-028-EPD) with thermistor, digital mic, and 9-axes motion sensor.

Offering best-in-class flexibility and ease-of-use, the PSoC 6 MCU architecture can serve as the catalyst for differentiated, visionary IoT devices. Designers can use software-defined peripherals to create custom analog front-ends (AFEs) or digital interfaces for innovative system components such as E-ink displays. The architecture is supported by Cypress’ PSoC Creator IDE and the expansive Arm ecosystem. Designers can find more information about PSoC Creator at http://www.cypressw.com/creator.

The PSoC 6 BLE Pioneer Kit (CY8CKIT-062-BLE) is available for purchase for $75 at the Cypress Online Store and through select distribution partners. PSoC 6 devices are currently sampling. Production devices are expected by the end of 2017.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

Getting Started with PSoC MCUs (Part 3)

Data Conversion, Capacitive Sensing and More

In the previous parts of this series, Nishant laid the groundwork for getting up and running with the PSoC. Here he tackles the chip’s more complex features like Data Conversion and CapSense.

By Nishant Mittal
Systems Engineer, Cypress Semiconductor

In the previous two parts of this “Getting started with PSoC” series, I have hopefully provided you with a good base of knowledge about PSoC devices. Here, in this final part it’s time to get more in depth and discuss various data conversion protocols in PSoC and provide some design examples. I’ll also cover interfacing various peripherals with the Photo 1microcontroller. We’ll also get into how to transition from a bare silicon PSoC chip or PSoC development board to using the chip in your project.

Data conversion with PSoC

Data Conversion is an important block in any kind of instrumentation system or Internet of Things implementation. In fact, any application that uses sensors or interfaces to the external environment is an application in which Data Conversion is an integral part of the system. Although digital sensors are available today, the lower costs of analog sensors shouldn’t be overlooked.

 

PSoC Creator has a Data Conversion component that enables designers to code efficiently with less effort. The photo above shows the screenshot of the ADC (analog-to-digital conversion) component in PSoC Creator. The photo above also shows the configuration setting for ADC. First off, we need to set the Channel sampling rate (SPS). Second, we need to set the voltage reference which is necessary to do the comparison of analog signals. Here we use VDDA/2 or VDDA which is 5 V. You can select whether you For web Figure 1want a single-ended ADC or differential ADC by simply clicking the appropriate tab from the component configuration. Clock source needs to be chosen. If the source is chosen to be internal, the PLL from the internals of chip are used—otherwise you’d have to connect an external crystal to the controller using the development kit CY8CKIT-044. Other advanced settings are available for complex programs—but most of those aren’t needed in most intermediate applications.

Read the full article in the September 326 issue of Circuit Cellar

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Cypress MCUs Selected for Toyota Camry Instrument Cluster

Cypress Semiconductor has announced that global automotive supplier DENSO has selected Cypress’ Traveo automotive microcontroller (MCU) family and FL-S Serial NOR Flash memory family to drive the advanced graphics in its instrument cluster for the 2017 Toyota Camry. The DENSO instrument cluster uses Traveo devices that Cypress says were the industry’s first 3D-capable ARM Cortex-R5 cluster MCUs.

Denso Instrument Cluster

The FL-S memory in the cluster is based on Cypress’ proprietary MirrorBit NOR Flash process technology, which enables high density serial NOR Flash memory by storing two bits per cell. The DENSO instrument cluster has 4.2- and 7.0-inch screens capable of audio, video and navigation in the center display of the 2017 Toyota Camry.

Cypress works with the world’s top automotive companies to support automotive systems including Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), 3-D graphics displays, wireless connectivity, full-featured touchscreens and superior body electronics. Cypress’ automotive portfolio includes the Traveo MCU family, power-management ICs (PMICs), PSoC programmable system-on-chip solutions, CapSense capacitive-sensing solutions, TrueTouch touchscreens, NOR flash, F-RAM and SRAM memories, and USB, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity solutions. The portfolio is backed by Cypress’ commitment to zero defects, excellent service and adherence to the most stringent industry standards, such as the ISO/TS 16949 quality management system, the Automotive Electronics Council (AEC) guidelines for ICs and the Production Part Approval Process (PPAP).

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

Cypress Begins Volume Shipments of MCUs Based on eCT Embedded Flash

Cypress Semiconductor Corp. recently started volume shipments of microcontrollers containing its proprietary 40-nm Embedded Charge-Trap (eCT) Flash manufactured at United Microelectronics Corporation (UMC). The shipments are part of a multiple-year collaboration between Cypress and UMC to integrate Cypress’s flash technology with UMC’s 40-nm Low Power (40LP) logic process.

With a 0.053 µm2 cell size, the eCT Flash macro is capable of 8-ns random access and 30-μs word-programming speed, making it well suited for high-performance applications as well as stringent automotive reliability requirements. The eCT Flash macros are also available for licensing from Cypress.

Source: Cypress Semiconductor

Programmable Analog SoCs for Embedded IoT Apps

Cypress Semiconductor Corp. recently introduced a new PSoC that simplifies the design of next-generation, multiple-sensor systems. Based on a 32-bit ARM Cortex-M0+ signal processing engine, the Analog Coprocessor integrates programmable analog blocks, including a new Universal Analog Block (UAB), which can be configured with GUI-based software components. You can use it  to continuously monitor multiple sensors, such as temperature, humidity, ambient light, motion, and sound. You can handle future design changes to support new sensor types by reconfiguring the programmable analog blocks.Cypress CY8C-KIT

Cypress’s free PSoC Creator Integrated Design Environment (IDE) enables you to design custom sensor interfaces. You can simply configure the programmable analog blocks by dragging and dropping components on the PSoC Creator schematic and customizing them with graphical component configuration tools. The components offer fully engineered embedded initialization, calibration, and temperature correction algorithms.

Available in a 3.7 mm × 2 mm chip-scale package, the PSoC Analog Coprocessor is currently sampling. Production is slated for Q4 2016.

Source: Cypress Semiconductor Corp.

New Programmable Oscillators for Next-Gen Networking Systems

Cypress Semiconductor recently introduced the CY294X high-performance programmable oscillator family. Delivering superb jitter performance and a wide range of output frequencies for embedded systems, the new oscillators offer performance that exceeds the reference clock requirements of high-speed interface standards including 40/100GbE, SyncE, and IEEE 1588.Cypress CY294X High-Performance Programmable Oscillator

Well-suited for networking applications, the CY294X family delivers RMS jitter performance of 110 fs (12 kHz – 20 MHz offset). The family comes with two evaluation kits (CY3676 and CY3677) and programming software (CyClockWizard 2.1).

The CY294X family is currently sampling in 5 mm × 7 mm LCC, 5 mm × 3.2 mm LCC, and 16-pin QFN packages.

Source: Cypress Semiconductor

Cypress Expands Portfolio with New Traveo Automotive Microcontroller Series

Cypress Semiconductor Corp. recently expanded of its automotive portfolio with the first series of its Traveo microcontroller family. The series features up to 4 MB of high-density embedded flash, stepper motor control, TFT display control, advanced sound output capabilities, and support for all in-vehicle networking standards.Cypress Traveo

Otimized for high-end body and gateway systems, the new series provides the ability to embed more on-chip flash memory for advanced applications. In addition, the 40-nm Traveo microcontrollers make it easy to implement Firmware Over-The-Air (FOTA) updates.

The new 40-nm Traveo S6J331X/S6J332X/S6J333X/S6J334X series offers a high-performance platform for classic instrument clusters. Based on the ARM Cortex-R5 processor with 240-MHz performance, it supports the CAN-FD automotive communication protocol for increased data bandwidth for faster networking.

Additionally, Cypress introduced a transceiver for the Clock Extension Peripheral Interface (CXPI) designed to replace the Local Interconnect Network (LIN) automotive communication protocol.

The Traveo S6J331X/S6J332X/S6J333X/S6J334X and S6J335X series is currently sampling and will be in production in the second half of 2016. It is available in 144-pin, 176-pin and 208-pin TEQFP packages.
The S6BT11X CXPI transceiver series is sampling now. It is available in an 8-pin SOP package.

Source: Cypress Semiconductor

Hexoskin Smart Shirt Integreates Cypress EZ-BLE PRoC Module

Hexoskin recently chose Cypress Semiconductor’s Bluetooth Smart-based EZ-BLE PRoC module for use in its Hexoskin Smart biometric-tracking shirts. Hexoskin Smart shirts feature sensors that track cardiac, respiratory, and activity data. The EZ-BLE PRoC module collects this data and pushes it to a mobile device for analysis via the free Hexoskin app or other fitness app. The module’s low power consumption more than doubles the Hexoskin’s battery life. The compact (10 mm × 10 mm × 1.8 mm) EZ-BLE PRoC module complies with wireless regulatory standards in the US, Canada, Europe, Japan, and Korea.Cypress EZ-BLE PRoC Module

The BLE Pioneer Development Kit gives you easy access to the Cypress Bluetooth Low Energy devices. It includes a USB Bluetooth Low Energy dongle that pairs with the CySmart master emulation tool, converting a designer’s Windows PC into a Bluetooth Low Energy debug environment. The EZ-BLE PRoC module can be quickly and easily evaluated with the EZ-BLE PRoC Module Evaluation Board, which plugs into the BLE Pioneer Development Kit ( $49).

Source: Cypress Semiconductor

New SLC NAND Flash Memory Family for High-Security Apps

Cypress Semiconductor Corp. recently announced a high-endurance, 1-to-4-Gb Single-Level Cell (SLC) SecureNAND family that reduces system costs and improves system security. It does this by providing a single nonvolatile memory with integrated block protection features for a variety of high-security applications, such as point-of-sale systems and wearables.Cypress SecureNAND

The SecureNAND family includes 1-Gb S34SL01G2, 2-Gb S34SL02G2, and 4-Gb S34SL04G2 devices. You can configure each device with nonvolatile block protection to store protected boot code, system firmware, and applications. They provide 100,000 program/erase cycles to ensure more than five years of system life. Their operating voltage range is 2.7  to 3.6 V and they support the industrial temperature range of –40° to 85°C.

The currently sampling 1-Gb S34SL01G2, 2-Gb S34SL02G2, and 4-Gb S34SL04G2 SecureNAND devices are available in a 63-BGA package.

Source: Cypress Semiconductor

F-RAM Expands the Density Range of Energy-Efficient Nonvolatile RAMs

Cypress Semiconductor Corp. today introduced a family of 4Mb serial Ferroelectric Random Access Memories (F-RAMs), which are the industry’s highest density serial F-RAMs. The 4-Mb serial F-RAMs feature a 40-MHz SPI, a 2-to-3.6-V operating voltage range and are available in industry-standard, RoHS-compliant package options. All Cypress F-RAMs provide 100 trillion read/write cycle endurance with 10-year data retention at 85˚C and 151 years at 65˚C.Cypress 4Mb Serial F-RAM

Cypress F-RAMs are ideal solutions for applications requiring continuous and frequent high-speed reading and writing of data with absolute data security. The 4-Mb serial F-RAM family addresses mission-critical applications such as industrial controls and automation, industrial metering, multifunction printers, test and measurement equipment, and medical wearables.

The 4-Mb serial F-RAMs are currently sampling in industry-standard 8EIAJ and 8TDFN packages. Production expected in the fourth quarter of 2015.

Source: Cypress Semiconductor

 

Streamlined Touchscreen Design with Application Builder and COMSOL Server

Cypress Semiconductor R&D engineers are creating simulation apps that streamline their touchscreen design processes. To do so, they’re sharing their simulation expertise with colleagues using the Application Builder and COMSOL Server, released with COMSOL Multiphysics simulation software version 5.COMSOL_5.1_COMSOL_Server

With the Application Builder, engineers can create ready-to-use simulation applications that can be implemented across departments, including by product development, sales, and customer service. The Application Builder enables simulation experts to build intuitive simulation apps based on their models directly within the COMSOL environment. COMSOL Server lets them share these apps with colleagues and customers around the globe.

To incorporate advances into touchscreen technology and embedded system products, Cypress simulation engineers use COMSOL for research and design initiatives. Their touchscreens are used in phones and MP3 devices, industrial applications, and more.

Source: COMSOL