Member Profile: Scott Weber

Scott Weber

Scott Weber

LOCATION:
Arlington, Texas, USA

MEMBER STATUS:
Scott said he started his Circuit Cellar subscription late in the last century. He chose the magazine because it had the right mix of MCU programming and electronics.

TECH INTERESTS:
He has always enjoyed mixing discrete electronic projects with MCUs. In the early 1980s, he built a MCU board based on an RCA CDP1802 with wirewrap and programmed it with eight switches and a load button.

Back in the 1990s, Scott purchased a Microchip Technology PICStart Plus. “I was thrilled at how powerful and comprehensive the chip and tools were compared to the i8085 and CDP1802 devices I tinkered with years before,” he said.

RECENT EMBEDDED TECH ACQUISITION:
Scott said he recently treated himself to a brand-new Fluke 77-IV multimeter.

CURRENT PROJECTS:
Scott is building devices that can communicate through USB to MS Windows programs. “I don’t have in mind any specific system to control, it is something to learn and have fun with,” he said. “This means learning not only an embedded USB software framework, but also Microsoft Windows device drivers.”

THOUGHTS ON THE FUTURE OF EMBEDDED TECH:
“Embedded devices are popping up everywhere—in places most people don’t even realize they are being used. It’s fun discovering where they are being applied. It is so much easier to change the microcode of an MCU or FPGA as the unit is coming off the assembly line than it is to rewire a complex circuit design,” Scott said.

“I also like Member Profile Joe Pfeiffer’s final comment in Circuit Cellar 276: Surface-mount and ASIC devices are making a ‘barrier to entry’ for the hobbyist. You can’t breadboard those things! I gotta learn a good way to make my own PCBs!”

Web-Based Remote I/O Control

The RIO-2010 is a web-based remote I/O control module. The Ethernet-ready module is equipped with eight relays, 16 photo-isolated digital inputs, and a 1-Wire interface for digital temperature sensor connection. The RIO-2010’s built-in web server enables you to access the I/O and use a standard web browser to remotely control the RIO-2010’s relay.

The RIO-2010 can be easily integrated into supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and industrial automation systems using the standard Modbus TCP protocol. The I/O module also comes with RS-485 serial interface for applications requiring Modbus RTU/ASCII. Its built-in web server enables you to use standard web-editing tools and Ajax dynamic page technology to customize your webpage.

Contact Artila for pricing.

Artila Electronics Co., Ltd.
www.artila.com

Low-Cost, High-Performance 32-bit Microcontrollers

The PIC32MX3/4 32-bit microcontrollers are available in 64/16-, 256/64-, and 512/128-KB flash/RAM configurations. The microcontrollers are coupled with Microchip Technology’s software and tools for designs in connectivity, graphics, digital audio, and general-purpose embedded control.

The microcontrollers offer high RAM memory options and high peripheral integration at a low cost. They feature 28 10-bit ADCs, five UARTS, 105-DMIPS performance, serial peripherals, a graphic display, capacitive touch, connectivity, and digital audio support.
The PIC32MX3/4 microcontrollers are supported with general software development tools, including Microchip Technology’s MPLAB X integrated development environment (IDE) and the MPLAB XC32 C/C++ compiler.

Application-specific tools include the Microchip Graphics Display Designer X and the Microchip Graphics Library, which provide a visual design tool that enables quick and easy creation of graphical user interface (GUI) screens for applications. The microcontrollers are also supported with a set of Microchip’s protocol stacks including TCP/IP, USB Device and Host, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi. For digital audio applications, Microchip provides software for tasks such as sample rate conversion (SRC), audio codecs—including MP3 and Advanced Audio Coding (AAC), and software to connect smartphones and other personal electronic devices.

The PIC32MX3/4 family is supported by Microchip’s PIC32 USB Starter Kit III, which costs $59.99 and the PIC32MX450 100-pin USB plug-in module, which costs $25 for the modular Explorer 16 development system. Pricing for the PIC32MX3/4 microcontrollers starts at $2.50 each in 10,000-unit quantities.

Microchip Technology, Inc.
www.microchip.com

MCU-Based Prosthetic Arm with Kinect

James Kim—a biomedical student at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada—recently submitted an update on the status of an interesting prosthetic arm design project. The design features a Freescale 9S12 microcontroller and a Microsoft Kinect, which tracks arm movements that are then reproduced on the prosthetic arm.

He also submitted a block diagram.

Overview of the prosthetic arm system (Source: J. Kim)

Kim explains:

The 9S12 microcontroller board we use is Arduino form-factor compatible and was coded in C using Codewarrior.  The Kinect was coded in C# using Visual Studio using the latest version of Microsoft Kinect SDK 1.5.  In the article, I plan to discuss how the microcontroller was set up to do deterministic control of the motors (including the timer setup and the PID code used), how the control was implemented to compensate for gravitational effects on the arm, and how we interfaced the microcontroller to the PC.  This last part will involve a discussion of data logging as well as interfacing with the Kinect.

The Kinect tracks a user’s movement and the prosthetic arm replicates it. (Source: J. Kim, YouTube)

The system includes:

Circuit Cellar intends to publish an article about the project in an upcoming issue.

Member Profile: Richard Lord

Richard Lord is an engineer, author, and photographer whose article series on an innovative digital camera controller project will begin in the October issue of Circuit Cellar.  Lord’s Photo-Pal design is an electronic flash-trigger camera controller built around a Microchip Technology PIC16F873. It features four modes of operation: triggered shutter, triggered flash, multiple flash, and time lapse. Now you too can take sound-triggered photos.

The Photo-Pal enables Richard to take amazing photos like this and capture high-speed action.

  • Member Name: Richard H. Lord
  • Location: Durham, NH, United States
  • Education: BS Electrical Engineering 1969, MS Biomedical Engineering, 1971
  • Occupation: Retired electronics hardware design engineer
  • Member Status: Richard said he has subscribed to Circuit Cellar for at least 14 years, maybe longer.
  • Technical Interests: Richard’s interests include photography, model railroading, and microcontroller projects.
  • Most Recent Embedded Tech-Related Purchase: Richard’s most recent purchase was a Microchip Technology dsPIC30F4013 digital signal controller.
  • Current Project: Richard is working on a Microchip PIC16F886-based multipurpose front panel interface controller.
  • Thoughts on the Future of Embedded Technology: “With the ready availability of prepackaged 32-bit processor modules, it’s easy to forget there are many applications where 8-bit controllers are more appropriate”, Richard said. He continued by saying he gets a lot of enjoyment from the challenge of working within the capabilities and constraints of the smaller microcontrollers.