Artisan’s Asylum

Artisan’s Asylum in Somerville, MA has the mission to promote and support the teaching, learning, and practicing of all varieties. Soumen Nandy is the Front Desk, General Volunteer, and Village Idiot of Artisan’s Asylum and she decided to tell us a little bit more about it.

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Photo courtesy of Artisan’s Asylum Facebook page

Location 10 Tyler St
Somerville, MA 02143
Members 400 active members
Website artisansasylum.com

Tell us about your meeting space!

We have around 40,000 sq. ft. that includes more than 150 studio spaces ranging from 50 sq. ft. to 200+ sq. ft. Our storage includes: lockers, 2 x 2 x 2 rack space, 40″ x 44″ pallets (up to 10′ tall), flexspace and studios. We have a truck-loading dock and a rail stop — yup, entire trains can pull up to our back doors for delivery. Can any other Maker Space say that? We also host a large roster of formal training courses in practical technologies, trades, crafts and arts, to help our members and the general community learn skills, and increase their awesomeness. (And not incidentally: become certified to safely use our gear.)

What are you working with?

Fully equipped wood, metal, machine, robotics, electronics, jewelry/glass shops, 12 sewing stations,  computer lab with all major professional modeling, CNC, and simulation packages (via direct partnerships with the respective companies). Multiple types of 3D printers, laser cutters, CNC routers, lathes, mills, etc. Too much more to list; if the Asylum doesn’t own/lease it, often a member, their business, or an institutional member can get it from you or get you access. And yet, it’s never enough.

Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

Quite a few things, but it’s a delicate balance between sustainable operations, growth and space for member studios vs. facilities. We’ve spun off or attracted many companies, so the empty factory complex we moved into (until recently the worlds largest envelope factory) has almost completely filled up.

Does your group work with embedded tech (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, MCU-based designs, etc.)?

Many of our members do. The group itself is too diverse to easily characterize.

What has your group been up to?

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Hanging with a giant robot. (Courtesy of https://www.facebook.com/ProjectHexapod)

We’re not purely a technological space. We have artists, artisans, tradespesons, crafters, hobbyists, and technologists. I know of at least two-million dollar Kickstarters that launched from here. Hmmm… How about the 18-foot wide rideable-hexapod robot that’s nearing conclusion (we call it “Stompy“) or the 4′ x 8′ large format laser cutter that should be operational any day now? These are just some notably big projects, not necessarily our most awesome.

Oh, wait. we did an Ides of March Festival, dressing up Union Square as a Roman Forum.

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

Well, a few weeks ago, I went home at 10 PM, and woke to a tweeted photo announcing that this had been built in our social area; It’s actually not among our most surprising events, but it has reappeared several times since (fast dis/assembly), and a reporter caught it once. I just happened to receive this link a couple of hours ago, so it was handy to forward to you. We do a lot of art and participation projects around Boston.

What does Artisan’s social calendar look like these days?

Too many events to list! We’re really looking to stabilize our base, seek congruent funding donors (we are a non-profit, but thus far have mostly run on internally-earned income). I’d be happy to arrange an interview with one of our honchos if you like—the goings-ons around here are really too much to fit in one brain. Those of us who give tours actually regularly take each other’s tours to learn stuff about the place we never knew.

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Keep getting awesomer. We love you!

Also, any philanthropists out there? Our members and facilities could be an excellent way to multiply your awesome impact.

Keep up with Artisan’s Asylum! Check out their website!

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet at a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

TinkerMill, where they share knowledge, lots of knowledge!

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TinkerMill is a Hacker/Makerspace from Longmont, CO. Where like-minded people get together and collaborate on anything art, technology, science, and business related.

Scott Converse is the founder of TinkerMill and tells us about the organization.

Location 1250 S. Hover #49, Longmont, CO 80501
Members 65
Website tinkermill.org

What’s your meeting space like? 

Our workshop is over 6,500 square feet and we also have an office space.

What tools do you have in your space? 

  • Electronics
  • PCB board design
  • Robotics
  • Soldering stations
  • Woodworking shop
  • Metalworking shop
  • Welding shop
  • Rapid Prototyping
  • Lab (CNC, Lastercutter, 3D Printers)
  • Brewery & Distillery
  • Jewelry
  • Datacenter
  • And many more…

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Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

Any PCB and pick/play stuff. Also some electronics supplies would be nice.

Does your group work with embedded tech like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, or MCU-based designs?

We work with Arduino and Raspberry Pi a lot. Embedded stuff comes along quite often. For example we also work with Nvidia’s Jetson TK1 board, oDroid boards, and Parallella boards.

What are some of the projects your group has been working on?

We just did the Denver Mini Maker Faire. We also built a Tesla coil and we have about a dozen of other projects, which you can all find on our website.

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

For our craziest project so far I must say it was the 15 foot human-powered Ferris wheel. This was a great project!

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Come on down and BUILD something with us!

Want to know more about TinkerMill? Make sure to check out their website!

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet at a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

Denhac — Hackerspace meets classroom for technology, art, and engineering

Denhac is a hackerspace on a mission to create and sustain a local, community driven, shared space, that enables education, experimentation, and collaboration, by applying the spirit of DIY to science, technology, engineering, and art.

Location 975 E 58th Ave, Unit N Denver, CO 80216
Members 45
Website Denhac.org

Alpha One Labs

What’s your meeting space like? 

It’s about 2,500 sq. ft. of commercial/warehouse/workshop space. We have an open shop floor area, bay doors, a classroom, an air-conditioned server room, and floorspace for several workstations specializing in various DIY areas.

What tools do you have in your space? 

  • Small OpenStack driven data center (four 72″ racks)
  • Cisco Networking workstation (for learning network engineering and infosec activities)
  • Textile workstation (sewing machines and USB driven embroidery machine) used for costuming, cosplay creation, etc.
  • 3D Printer workstation with Lulzbot printer
  • SeeMeCNC large format printer
  • Electronics workstation with oscilloscopes, breadboards, components, testing equipment, etc.
  • Soldering station
  • Small tools workstation (grinders, dremels, etc.),
  • Large format printer workstation,
  • Lasercutter (100watt),
  • Internet radio station (www.denhacradio.org) with a group going for a Low Power FM license (for running a community radio station)
  • Lots of racks for servers
  • 100 MB Internet

Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

A metal forge, welding gear, carpentry gear, and CNC Tools.

Does your group work with embedded tech like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, or MCU-based designs?

Yes, we teach classes on all of these (and more).

What are some of the projects your group has been working on?

Many and few, lots of individual projects. The group focuses more on collecting great tools for it’s members, and teaching classes on a broad range of topics (from making costumes, to hacking Arduino’s, to synthetic biology DNA hacking with bioblocks).

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

9′ Tesla coil. Also, a Steampunk flamethrower.

You mentioned a Low Power FM group earlier, can you tell us more about it? Are there other events or initiatives you’d like to talk about?

Yes, we’re just starting up a Low Power FM (LPFM) group that will be applying for a license to set up and run an FM community radio station at Denhac. We started a weekly Kids Coding Dojo class that teaches kids from ages six to fifteen how to code. (Accompanied by their parents.) We have a software defined radio hacking group (Radio Heads) that uses programs like GNUradio with SDR-capable radio kits and dongles to ‘listen in’ on the world. A BIG antenna is needed for that! We have a LockSport group that meets monthly and has some expert lock pickers. We have a 3D and LaserCutter printer group that meets as needed to teach members and the public how to use the equipment and to trade ideas on what to make next.

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Come and visit! We love visitors.

Want to know more about Denhac? Make sure to check out their website!

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

Makelab Charleston, a place for hobbyists and professionals

Makelab Charleston is a hackerspace for hobbyist and professionals who share common interests in technology, computers, science, or digital/electronics art. It provides an environment for people to create anything they can imagine: from electronics, 3D printing, and construction, to networking, and programming.

Location 3955 Christopher St, North Charleston, SC 29405
Members 24

Treasurer David Vandermolen will tell us something more about Makelab Charleston.

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Tell us about your meeting space!

We started in a 500 sq. ft. garage, but took a step up and are currently renting a 900+ sq. ft. home that’s been renovated.  We now have the space for a electronic/soldering room that also has our 3-D printer. One other room is dedicated to power-type tools and our CNC machine that is still being built by our members.  The other spaces in the house are used for classes and member activities such as LAN parties.

What tools do you have in your space? (Soldering stations? Oscilloscopes? 3-D printers?)

Soldering stations, oscilloscopes, 3-D printer, power tools, large table-top CNC machine (in progress), and a rack server for the IT minded to play with.

Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

A laser CNC, nice tables, and chairs .

Does your group work with embedded tech (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, MCU-based designs, etc.)?

We have members that dabble in multiple areas so we try to provide classes on the technology people want to learn about and explore.

Can you tell us about some of your group’s recent tech projects?

Our most recent tech project has been a overhaul of our server system. Other projects include the CNC currently in progress. That’s been an ongoing project for about a year.

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

Probably the wackiest project we completed was actually, something not tech related at all, building a bed for Charleston Bed Races. We put together a Lego bed (not real Legos) complete with Lego man and all.

Do you have any events or initiatives you’d like to tell us about? Where can we learn more about it?

We list any events or classes we are doing or plan on doing on our Website. Just click on classes and events on the main page or go to the calendar tab.

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Makelab Charleston is about opening the world to information and sharing that information with the people in our community. The best way to do that is through teaching.

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

A Workspace for “Engineering Magic”

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Photo 1—Brandsma describes his workspace as his “little corner where the engineering magic happens.”

Sjoerd Brandsma, an R&D manager at CycloMedia, enjoys designing with cameras, GPS receivers, and transceivers. His creates his projects in a small workspace in Kerkwijk, The Netherlands (see Photo 1). He also designs in his garage, where he uses a mill and a lathe for some small and medium metal work (see Photo 2).

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Photo 2—Brandsma uses this Weiler lathe for metal work.

The Weiler lathe has served me and the previous owners for many years, but is still healthy and precise. The black and red mill does an acceptable job and is still on my list to be converted to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine.

Brandsma described some of his projects.

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Photo 3—Some of Brandsma’s projects include an mbed-based camera project (left), a camera with an 8-bit parallel databus interface (center), and an MP3 player that uses a decoder chip that is connected to an mbed module (right).

I built a COMedia C328 UART camera with a 100° lens placed on a 360° servomotor (see Photo 3, left).  Both are connected to an mbed module. When the system starts, the camera takes a full-circle picture every 90°. The four images are stored on an SD card and can be stitched into a panoramic image. I built this project for the NXP mbed design challenge 2010 but never finished the project because the initial idea involved doing some stitching on the mbed module itself. This seemed to be a bit too complicated due to memory limitations.

I built this project built around a 16-MB framebuffer for the Aptina MT9D131 camera (see Photo 3, center). This camera has an 8-bit parallel databus interface that operates on 6 to 80 MHz. This is way too fast for most microcontrollers (e.g., Arduino, Atmel AVR, Microchip Technology PIC, etc.). With this framebuffer, it’s possible to capture still images and store/process the image data at a later point.

This project involves an MP3 player that uses a VLSI VS1053 decoder chip that is connected to an mbed module (see Photo 3, right). The great thing about the mbed platform is that there’s plenty of library code available. This is also the case for the VS1053. With that, it’s a piece of cake to build your own MP3 player. The green button is a Skip button. But beware! If you press that button it will play a song you don’t like and you cannot skip that song.

He continued by describing his test equipment.

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Photo 4—Brandsma’s test equipment collection includes a Tektronix TDS220 oscilloscope (top), a Total Phase Beagle protocol analyzer (second from top), a Seeed Technology Open Workbench Logic Sniffer (second from bottom), and a Cypress Semiconductor CY7C68013A USB microcontroller (bottom).

Most of the time, I’ll use my good old Tektronix TDS220 oscilloscope. It still works fine for the basic stuff I’m doing (see Photo 4, top). The Total Phase Beagle I2C/SPI protocol analyzer Beagle/SPI is a great tool to monitor and analyze I2C/SPI traffic (see Photo 4, second from top).

The red PCB is a Seeed Technology 16-channel Open Workbench Logic Sniffer (see Photo 4, second from bottom). This is actually a really cool low-budget open-source USB logic analyzer that’s quite handy once in a while when I need to analyze some data bus issues.

The board on the bottom is a Cypress CY7C68013A USB microcontroller high-speed USB peripheral controller that can be used as an eight-channel logic analyzer or as any other high-speed data-capture device (see Photo 4, bottom). It’s still on my “to-do” list to connect it to the Aptina MT9D131 camera and do some video streaming.

Brandsma believes that “books tell a lot about a person.” Photo 5 shows some books he uses when designing and or programming his projects.

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Photo 5—A few of Brandsma’s “go-to” books are shown.

The technical difficulty of the books differs a lot. Electronica echt niet moeilijk (Electronics Made Easy) is an entry-level book that helped me understand the basics of electronics. On the other hand, the books about operating systems and the C++ programming language are certainly of a different level.

An article about Brandsma’s Sun Chaser GPS Reference Station is scheduled to appear in Circuit Cellar’s June issue.

G-Code CNC Router Controller

Brian Millier constructed a microcontroller-based, G-code controller for a CNC router. So, we gave the retired instrumentation engineer space to publish a two-part series about his project.

In Part 1 (Millier-CC-2013-04-Issue 273), Millier explains the basics of G-code and how it is converted into three-axis motion, via the router’s three stepper motors. In Part 2, he describes his design of the router’s axis controller (powered by three small microcontrollers) and the host controller (powered by a more powerful microcontroller).

He calls the project one of the most challenging he has ever tackled.

So why bother? Especially when the combination of a PC and ArtSoft’s Mach3 software is a common and affordable approach to running a CNC router? Well, like most DIYers, Millier couldn’t resist an opportunity to learn.

“I want to be upfront and say that this is probably not the most practical project I have ever done,” Millier says in Part 1. “You can usually pick up a used PC for free, and the Mach3 software is professional-grade and handles much more complex G-code programs than my DIY controller will. However, it did provide me with a challenging programming task, and I learned a lot about designing a program with many concurrent tasks, all of which are quite time critical. Even if you are not interested in building such a controller, you may find interesting some of the techniques and tricks I used to provide the multi-axis stepper-motor motion.”

Millier’s two articles focus on the two main tasks of his project.

“The first was to understand the G-code language used to program CNC machines well enough to be able to write the firmware that would parse the G-code commands into something that a microcontroller could use to control the stepper motors used for each of the three axes,” he says. “The second task was to design the hardware/firmware that would actually control the three stepper motors, all of which had to move synchronously at accurate, ramped speeds.”

Millier wraps up his project by saying: “This was probably the most challenging project I’ve tackled, outside of work projects, in many years. In particular, the Basic program code for both of the controllers ran beyond 3,500 lines.”

You can Millier-CC-2013-04-Issue 273. The second article is available via Circuit Cellar’s webshop.