Dotdot Spec to Run on Thread’s IP Network

The Zigbee Alliance and Thread Group have announced the availability of the Dotdot specification over Thread’s IP network. This enables developers to confidently use an established, open and interoperable IoT language over a low-power wireless IP network. This is expected to help unify the fragmented connected device industry and unlock new markets.

Dotdot is the Zigbee Alliance’s universal language for the IoT, making it possible for smart objects to work together on any network. Thread is the Thread Group’s open, IPv6-based, low-power, secure and future-proof mesh networking technology for IoT products. These two organizations have come together to deliver a mature, scalable solution for IoT interoperability that isn’t confined to single-vendor ecosystems or technologies.

Dotdot-over-Thread-no-sub-01The early Internet faced the same challenges as today’s IoT. Currently, connected devices can struggle to deliver a seamless experience because they speak different languages (or in technical terms, use different “application layers”). For the internet, the industry solved this problem with open, universal protocols over IP. Dotdot’s common device language over Thread’s IP network extends this same proven approach to the Internet of Things. With Dotdot over Thread, product and platform vendors can ensure the high-quality, interoperable user experiences needed to drive growth, while IP allows vendors to maintain a direct connection to their device.

It’s important to note that Dotdot over Thread is not another new standard. Dotdot enables the open, mature, and already widely adopted application layer at the heart of Zigbee to work across Thread’s IP network. It uses the same network technology fundamental to the internet. For product managers, new standards represent risk. Dotdot and Thread are backed by global, industry-leading companies and represent two of the most robust, widely deployed, and well-supported connectivity and interoperability technologies, driving billions of products and networks already in homes and offices.

The Dotdot specification is available today to Zigbee Alliance members. Additional resources, including the Dotdot Commissioning Application, will be available in Summer 2018, along with the opening of the Dotdot Certification program from the Zigbee Alliance. Thread launched its 1.1 specification and opened its certification program in February 2017. The Zigbee Alliance and Thread Group now share a number of common authorized test service providers, and are working with them to ensure an efficient, seamless certification process for Dotdot over Thread adopters. More information on this program will be announced soon.

The Zigbee Alliance | www.zigbee.org

Thread Group | www.threadgroup.org

Automotive-Grade IoT Gateways

Eurotech has expanded its range of Multi-service IoT Gateways with the launch of the DynaGATE 10-12 and the announcement of the DynaGATE 10-06. Both systems are carrier pre-certified, with an integrated LTE Cat 1 cellular, GPS, Wi-Fi, BLE, E-Mark and SAE/J1455 certifications and a -40 ºC to +85 ºC operating temperature.

The DynaGATE 10-12 is a low-power gateway based on the TI AM335X Cortex-A8 (Sitara) processor family, with 1 GB RAM and 4 GB eMMC. It features a 6 to 36VDC power supply with transient protection and vehicle ignition sense, 2x protected RS-232/RS-485 serial ports, 2x CAN bus interfaces, 3x noise and surge protected USB ports and 4x isolated digital I/Os. The DynaGATE 10-12 is suitable for on-board applications, with a metal enclosure, high retention connectors and screw-flange terminal blocks.

The connectivity capabilities of the DynaGATE 10-12 include an internal LTE Cat 1 modem with dual Micro-SIM support, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth Low Energy, 2x Fast Ethernet ports, and an internal GPS (optionally with Dead Reckoning) for precise geolocation.

DynaGATE 10-06.jpgThe DynaGATE 10-06 (shown) is an IP67, heavy-duty IoT gateway for Automotive applications. It features an internal battery that provides minutes of uninterrupted operation in case of power failure. Based on the NXP i.MX 6UltraLite Cortex-A7 processor, with 512MB RAM and 4GB eMMC, the DynaGATE 10-06 features a 6 to 36V power supply with protections and vehicle ignition sense, 3x protected RS-232/RS-485 serial ports, 2x CAN bus interfaces, 1x noise and surge protected USB port and 2x protected digital I/O. All these interfaces are available through a rugged AMPSEAL connector.

The DynaGATE 10-06 connectivity capabilities range from an internal LTE Cat 1 modem with dual Micro-SIM support, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth Low Energy, to a dedicated GPS with optional Dead Reckoning and 2x Fast Ethernet ports on rugged M12 connectors.

In addition, the DynaGATE 10-12 and DynaGATE 10-06 connectivity capabilities can be expanded through the ReliaCELL 10-20 family, that includes several 2G/3G/LTE global, rugged cellular modules certified by leading carriers. The DynaGATE 10-12 is also expandable with Eurotech ReliaLORA 10-12, a LoRa LPWAN Gateway unit, and the ReliaIO 10-12, a DAQ unit that provides analog inputs, more digital I/O interfaces and other functionalities.

The DynaGATE 10-12 and the DynaGATE 10-06 come with a genuine Oracle Java SE Embedded 8 Virtual Machine and Everyware Software Framework (ESF), a commercial, enterprise version of Eclipse Kura, the Java/OSGi edge computing platform for IoT gateways. Distributed and supported by Eurotech, ESF adds advanced security, diagnostics, provisioning, remote access and full integration with Everyware Cloud (EC), the Eurotech IoT integration platform (separately available).

Eurotech | www.eurotech.com

Partner Program to Focus on Security

Microchip Technology has also established a Security Design Partner Program for connecting developers with third-party partners that can enhance and expedite secure designs. Along with the program, the company has also released its ATECC608A CryptoAuthentication device, a secure element that allows developers to add hardware-based security to their designs.

Microchip 38318249941_bf38a56692_zAccording to Microchip, the foundation of secured communication is the ability to create, protect and authenticate a device’s unique and trusted identity. By keeping a device’s private keys isolated from the system in a secured area, coupled with its industry-leading cryptography practices, the ATECC608A provides a high level of security that can be used in nearly any type of design. The ATECC608A includes the Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS)-compliant Random Number Generator (RNG) that generates unique keys that comply with the latest requirements from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), providing an easier path to a whole-system FIPS certification.

Other features include:

  • Boot validation capabilities for small systems: New commands facilitate the signature validation and digest computation of the host microcontroller firmware for systems with small MCUs, such as an ARM Cortex-M0+ based device, as well as for more robust embedded systems.
  • Trusted authentication for LoRa nodes: The AES-128 engine also makes security deployments for LoRa infrastructures possible by enabling authentication of trusted nodes within a network.
  •  Fast cryptography processing: The hardware-based integrated Elliptical Curve Cryptography (ECC) algorithms create smaller keys and establish a certificate-based root of trust more quickly and securely than other implementation approaches that rely on legacy methods.
  •  Tamper-resistant protections: Anti-tampering techniques protect keys from physical attacks and attempted intrusions after deployment. These techniques allow the system to preserve a secured and trusted identity.
  •  Trusted in-manufacturing provisioning: Companies can use Microchip’s secured manufacturing facilities to safely provision their keys and certificates, eliminating the risk of exposure during manufacturing.

In addition to providing hardware security solutions, customers have access to Microchip’s Security Design Partner Program. These industry-leading companies, including Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud Platform, provide complementary cloud-driven security models and infrastructure. Other partners are well-versed in implementing Microchip’s security devices and libraries. Whether designers are looking to secure an Internet of Things (IoT) application or add authentication capabilities for consumables, such as cartridges or accessories, the expertise of the Security Design Partners can reduce both development cost and time to market.

For rapid prototyping of secure solutions, designers can use the new CryptoAuth Xplained Pro evaluation and development kit (ATCryptoAuth-XPRO-B) which is an add-on board, compatible with any Microchip Xplained or Xplained Pro evaluation board. The ATECC608A is available for $0.56 each in 10,000 unit quantities. The ATCryptoAuth-XPRO-B add-on development board is available for $10.00 each.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

MCU Vendors Embrace Amazon FreeRTOS

In a flurry of announcements concurrent with Amazon’s release of its new Amazon FreeRTOS operating system, microcontroller vendors are touting their collaborative efforts to support the OS. Amazon FreeRTOS extends the FreeRTOS kernel, a popular open source RTOS for microcontrollers, and includes software libraries for security, connectivity and updateability. Here’s a selection of announcements from the MCU community:

Microchip PIC32MZEF MCUs Support Amazon FreeRTOS
curiosityMicrochip Technology has expanded its collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to support cloud-connected embedded systems from the node to the cloud. Microchip’s PIC32MZ EF series of microcontrollers now support Amazon FreeRTOS.

STMicro Adds Amazon FreeRTOS to its IoT MCU Tool Suit
STMicroelectronics has announced its collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) on Amazon FreeRTOS, the latest addition to the AWS Internet of Things (IoT) solution.

 

NXP MCU IoT Card with Wi-Fi Supports Amazon FreeRTOS
OM40007-LPC54018-IoT-ModuleNXP Semiconductors has introduced the LPC54018 MCU-based IoT module with onboard Wi-Fi and support for the new Amazon FreeRTOS on Amazon Web Services (AWS), offering developers universal connections to AWS.

 

TI SimpleLink™ MCU platform now supports new Amazon FreeRTOS (PRNewsfoto/Texas Instruments Incorporated)

TI Integrates SimpleLink MCU Platform with Amazon FreeRTOS
Texas Instruments (TI) has announced the integration of the new Amazon FreeRTOS into the SimpleLink microcontroller platform.

Renesas IoT Sandbox Supports RX65N MCU

Renesas Electronics America has expanded its Renesas IoT Sandbox lineup with the new RX65N Wi-Fi Cloud Connectivity Kit. The RX65N Wi-Fi Cloud Connectivity Kit provides an easy-to-use platform for connecting to the cloud, evaluating IoT solutions and creating IoT applications through cloud services and real-time workflows. The RX65N Wi-Fi Cloud Connectivity Kit integrates the high-performance Renesas RX65N microcontroller (MCU) and Medium One’s Smart Proximity demo with the data intelligence featured in Renesas IoT Sandbox.

RX65N_IoT_Sandbox_Wifi_Kit_UnpackedThe Renesas IoT Sandbox provides a fast path from IoT concept to prototype. It enables personalized data intelligence for system developers working with the Renesas SynergyTM Platform, the Renesas RL78 Family and RX Family of MCUs, and the Renesas RZ Family of microprocessors. The new RX65N Wi-Fi Cloud Connectivity Kit is based on the Renesas RX65N Group of MCUs, which is part of the high-performance RX600 Series of MCUs.

The new kit features the Smart Proximity demo implemented by Medium One. System developers can use workflows to extract data from the Ultrasonic Range Finder Sensor and then transmit distance data and duration length for objects close to the sensor to provide intelligence on end-user engagement with the objects. For instance, when deployed in retail environments, business owners can leverage the data to determine when and for how long shoppers view specific merchandise, providing greater insight on shoppers’ selection behaviors.

Developers can sign up for a Renesas IoT Sandbox account at www.renesas.com/iotsandbox. The data intelligence developer area is ready for immediate prototyping use. The RX65N Wi-Fi Connectivity Kit is available for order at Amazon for $59 per kit.

Renesas Electronics | www.renesas.com

NXP MCU IoT Card with Wi-Fi Supports Amazon FreeRTOS

NXP Semiconductors has introduced the LPC54018 MCU-based IoT module with onboard Wi-Fi and support for newly launched Amazon FreeRTOS on Amazon Web Services (AWS), offering developers universal connections to AWS. Amazon FreeRTOS provides tools for users to quickly and easily deploy an MCU-based connected device and develop an IoT application without having to worry about the complexity of scaling across millions of devices. Once connected, IoT device applications can take advantage of the capabilities of the cloud or continue processing data locally with AWS Greengrass.

Amazon FreeRTOS enables security-strong orchestration with the edge-cluster to further leverage low latencies in edge computing configurations, which extends AWS Greengrass core devices’ reach to the nodes. Distributed and autonomous computing architectures become possible through the consistent interface provided between the nodes and their gateways, in both online and offline scenario.

OM40007-LPC54018-IoT-ModuleNXP’s IoT module, co-developed with Embedded Artists and based on the LPC54018 MCU, offers unlimited memory extensibility, a root of trust built on the embedded SRAM physical unclonable functions (PUF) and on-chip cryptographic accelerators. Together, LPC and Amazon FreeRTOS, with easy-to-use software libraries, bring multiple layers of network transport security, simplify cloud on-boarding and over-the-air device management.

NXP enables node-to-cloud AWS connectivity with its LPC54018-based IoT module available on Amazon.com and EmbeddedArtists.com at $35 direct to consumers.

NXP Semiconductors | www.nxp.com

Microchip PIC32MZEF MCUs Support Amazon FreeRTOS

Microchip Technology has expanded its collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to support cloud-connected embedded systems from the node to the cloud. Supporting Amazon Greengrass, Amazon FreeRTOS and AWS Internet of Things (IoT), Microchip provides all the components, tools, software and support needed to rapidly develop secure cloud-connected systems.

Microchip’s PIC32MZ EF series of microcontrollers now support Amazon FreeRTOS, an operating system that makes compact low-powered edge devices easy to program, deploy, secure and maintain. These high-performance MCUs incorporate industry-leading connectivity options, ample Flash memory, rich peripherals and a robust toolchain which empower embedded designers to rapidly build complex applications. Amazon FreeRTOS includes software libraries which make it easy to securely deploy over-the-air updates as well as the ability to connect devices locally to AWS Greengrass or directly to the cloud, providing a variety of data processing location options.

For systems requiring data collection and analysis at a local level, developers can use Microchip’s SAMA5D2 series of microprocessors with integrated AWS Greengrass software. This will enable systems to run local compute, messaging, data caching and sync capabilities for connected devices in a secure way. This type of execution provides improved event response, conserves bandwidth and enables more cost-effective cloud computing. The SAMA5D2 devices, also available in System-in-Package (SiP) variants, offer full Amazon Greengrass compatibility in a low-power, small form factor MPU targeted at industrial and long-life gateway and concentrator applications. Additionally, the integrated security features and extended temperature range allows these MPUs to be deployed in physically insecure and harsh environments.

In any cloud-connected design, security and ease of use are vital pieces of the puzzle. Microchip’s ATECC608A CryptoAuthentication device enables enhanced system security as well as easy-to-use registration. The secure element provides a unique, trusted and protected identity to each device that can be securely authenticated to protect a brand’s intellectual property and revenue. In addition to enhancing system security, the ATECC608A allows AWS customers to instantly connect to the cloud through the device’s Just-in-Time-Registration (JITR) powered by AWS IoT.

curiosityMicrochip has an extensive toolchain for rapid and reliable development. The Curiosity PIC32MZ EF development board (shown), to kick-start Amazon FreeRTOS-based designs, is a fully integrated 32-bit development platform which also includes two mikroBUS expansion sockets, enabling designers to easily add additional capabilities, such as Wi-Fi with the WINC1510 click board, to their designs. The SAMA5D2 Xplained Ultra board, which can be used for AWS Greengrass designs, is a fast prototyping and evaluation platform for the SAMA5D2 series of MPUs. Additionally, the CryptoAuth Xplained Pro evaluation and development kit is an add-on board for rapid prototyping of secure solutions on AWS IoT and is compatible with any Microchip Xplained or XplainedPro evaluation boards. AWS is also a part of Microchip’s Design Partner Program which provides technical expertise and cost-effective solutions in a timely manner.

PIC32MZ EF MCUs are available starting at $5.48 each in 10,000 unit quantities. The PIC32MZ EF Curiosity board (DM320104) is available for $47.99 each. SAMA5D2 MPUs are available starting at $4.42 each in 10,000 unit quantities. The SAMA5D2 Xplained Ultra board (ATSAMA5D2C-XULT) is available for $150 each. ATECC608A secure elements are available starting at $0.56 each in 10,000 unit quantities. The CryptoAuth Xplained Pro evaluation and development kit (ATCryptoAuth-XPRO-B) is available for $10 each.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

STMicro Adds Amazon FreeRTOS to its IoT MCU Tool Suite

STMicroelectronics has announced its collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) on Amazon FreeRTOS, the latest addition to the AWS Internet of Things (IoT) solution. Amazon FreeRTOS provides everything one needs to easily and securely deploy microcontroller-based connected devices and develop an IoT application without having to worry about the complexity of scaling across millions of devices. Once connected, IoT device applications can take advantage of all of the capabilities the cloud has to offer or continue processing data locally with AWS Greengrass.

ST’s collaboration with AWS speeds designers’ efforts to create easily connectable IoT nodes with the combination of ST’s semiconductor building blocks and Amazon FreeRTOS, which extends the leading free and open-source real-time operating-system kernel for embedded devices (FreeRTOS) with the appropriate libraries for local networking, cloud connectivity, security, and remote software updates.

For the STM32, ST’s family of 32-bit Arm Cortex-M microcontrollers, the modular and interoperable IoT development platform spans state-of-the-art semiconductor components, ready-to-use development boards, free software tools and common application examples. At the official release of Amazon FreeRTOS, a version of the OS and libraries were immediately made available to run on the ultra-low-power STM32L4 series of microcontrollers.

The starter kit for Amazon FreeRTOS is ST’s B-L475E-IOT01A Discovery kit for IoT node, a fully integrated development board that exploits low-power communication, multiway sensing, and a raft of features provided by the STM32L4 series microcontroller to enable a wide range of IoT-capable applications. The Discovery kit’s support for Arduino Uno V3 and PMOD connectivity ensures unlimited expansion capabilities with a large choice of specialized add-on boards.

STMicroelectronics | www.st.com

TI Integrates SimpleLink MCU Platform with Amazon FreeRTOS

Texas Instruments (TI) has announced the integration of the new Amazon FreeRTOS into the SimpleLink microcontroller platform. Amazon Web Services (AWS) has worked with TI in the development of an integrated hardware and software solution that enables developers to quickly establish a connection to AWS IoT service out-of-the-box and immediately begin system development.

TI SimpleLink™ MCU platform now supports new Amazon FreeRTOS (PRNewsfoto/Texas Instruments Incorporated)

TI’s SimpleLink Wi-Fi CC3220SF wireless MCU LaunchPad development kit, which now supports Amazon FreeRTOS, offers embedded security features such as secure storage, cloning protection, secure bootloader and networking security. Developers can now take advantage of these security features to help them protect cloud-connected IoT devices from theft of intellectual property (IP) and data or other risks.

TI offers a broad portfolio of building blocks for IoT nodes and gateways spanning wired and wireless connectivity, microcontrollers, processors, sensing technology, power management and analog solutions, along with a community of cloud service providers, such as AWS, to help developers get connected to the cloud faster.

The SimpleLink MCU platform from Texas Instruments is a single development environment that delivers flexible hardware, software and tool options for customers developing Internet of Things (IoT) applications. With a single software architecture, modular development kits and free software tools for every point in the design life cycle, the SimpleLink MCU ecosystem allows 100 percent code reuse across the portfolio of microcontrollers, which supports a wide range of connectivity standards and technologies including RS-485, Bluetooth low energy, Wi-Fi, Sub-1 GHz, 6LoWPAN, Ethernet, RF4CE and proprietary radio frequencies. SimpleLink MCUs help manufacturers easily develop and seamlessly reuse resources to expand their portfolio of connected products.

Texas Instruments | www.ti.com

NXP and Alibaba Cloud Team up for IoT Deal

NXP Semiconductors has announced a strategic partnership with Alibaba Cloud, the cloud computing and business unit of Alibaba Group. The two companies are working together to enable development of secure smart devices for edge computing applications and have plans to further develop solutions for the IoT.

NXP_logo_RGB_webAs part of the partnership, AliOS Things, the Alibaba IoT operating system has been integrated onto NXP applications processors, microcontroller chips, and Layerscape multicore processors. Both NXP’s i.MX and Layerscape processors are currently the only embedded systems on the market using the Alibaba Cloud TEE OS platform. The new solution benefits various markets including automotive, smart retail and smart home. And it is currently being applied in applications such as automotive entertainment and infotainment systems, QR code payment scanning applications and smart home speakers.

With the partnership between NXP and Alibaba Cloud Link in the field of IoT security, NXP has become a council member of the ICA IoT Connectivity Alliance. In the future, the two companies plan to jointly develop solutions to support application development in different fields including smart manufacturing and smart city.

The ‘Annual Report of China IoT Development 2015-2016’ predicts that the amount of equipment connected to IoT globally will reach 20-50 billion by 2020, with 80 percent of that equipment in China. NXP’s robust product portfolio covers offering from the edge node to gateway and comprehensive cloud IoT solutions. NXP’s products are widely used in smart homes, smart cities, smart transportation and secure connectivity.

NXP Semiconductors | www.nxp.com

Microsoft IoT Central Gets Public Preview

Microsoft has launched the public preview of Microsoft IoT Central. The company clains Microsoft IoT Central is the first true highly scalable IoT software-as-a-service (SaaS) solution that offers built-in support for IoT best practices and world-class security. Microsoft IoT Central enables companies to build production-grade IoT applications in hours—without having to manage all the necessary back-end infrastructure or learn new skills.

14According to the company, Microsoft IoT Central takes the hassle out of creating an IoT solution by eliminating the complexities of initial setup as well as the management burden and operational overhead of a typical IoT project. That means users can bring their connected product vision to life faster while staying focused on their customers and products. The complete IoT solution lets users seamlessly scale from a few to millions of connected devices as IoT needs grow. Moreover, it removes guesswork thanks to simple and comprehensive pricing that makes it easier to plan IoT investments.

On the security front, Microsoft IoT Central leverages privacy standards and technologies to help ensure data is only accessible to the right people in an organization. With IoT privacy features such as role-based access and integration with Azure Active Directory permissions, users stay in control of their information. In the coming months, Microsoft IoT Central will also be able to integrate with customers’ existing business systems—such as Microsoft Dynamics 365, SAP and Salesforce.

Microsoft is also announcing the availability of Azure IoT Hub Device Provisioning Service. Azure IoT Hub Device Provisioning Service enables zero-touch device provisioning and configuration of millions of devices to Azure IoT Hub in a secure and scalable manner. Device Provisioning Service adds important capabilities that, together with Azure IoT Hub device management, help customers easily manage all stages of the IoT device lifecycle.

For a deeper look into the features of Microsoft IoT Central, go to its new website.

Mircosoft | www.microsoft.com

IoTSF Updates IoT Security Compliance Framework

The Internet of Things Security Foundation (IoTSF) announced today that it has updated its industry leading IoT Security Compliance Framework to Release 1.1. The Framework was created by security practitioners and aimed at product developers, manufacturers and supply chain managers. This release details 204 controls across 14 themes that businesses can use to ensure their consumer category products are IoT ready. A companion questionnaire is also supplied and provides a simple mechanism for documenting requirement responses.

Compliance-Framework-and-Questionnaire-1-1-1-400x400IoTSF also extended its best practice guidance for connected consumer products to include logging and software update policy as part of its review. The framework, questionnaire and best practice guidelines are available to download for free from the IoTSF website. Users are also invited to use the Best Practice User Mark to inform their public that they observe security best practices in their organizations.

Richard Marshall, IoTSF Executive Steering Board member, said “since we published the first version of the Framework it has been downloaded, used and referenced by a wide number of stakeholders. These updates build on the first release and further strengthen the security mechanisms that organizations need to provide. We’ve also added a companion questionnaire to assist businesses in their security risk assessments. As IoT covers a vast number of use cases, the Framework is written in a manner that makes it extensible, and we will add categories beyond its consumer based origins in future releases.”

John Moor, IoTSF Managing Director also commented that “the era of IoT is characterized by hyper-connectivity and software defined products. Ensuring fit for purpose security is recognized as a wicked challenge which requires many stakeholders, and more than technical solutions alone. We are encouraging all organizations that provide or use IoT-class technology to be proactive, and think about their duty of care to their customers and wider society. We’re here to help in that endeavor, and we’re delighted to announce these updates to our publications today. Further, we encourage industry to provide feedback so that we can ensure they are easy to use and stay relevant in the fast-paced world of connected and digital technology.”

The publications can be downloaded direct from the IoTSF website: www.iotsecurityfoundation.org/best-practice-guidelines

Internet of Things Security Foundation | www.iotsecurityfoundation.org

IoT Tool Suite Supports Bluetooth 5

Rigado has announced its Edge Connectivity Suite with full support for Bluetooth 5. Designed for large-scale commercial IoT deployments, Rigado’s Edge Connectivity solution is comprised of Bluetooth 5 end-device modules and the Vesta IoT Gateway, which includes cloud-based tools for secure deployment and updating.

The Edge Connectivity Suite actively addresses a growing need for low-power wireless within commercial IoT applications like asset tracking, smart lighting and connected retail and hospitality. The company’s Bluetooth 5-enabled solutions support the flexibility, interoperability and security demands of large-scale commercial IoT deployments. Moreover, the suite addresses the market need for Edge Computing at scale, paving a secure and cost-effective road for data from device-to-cloud.

Specifically designed for companies who need to develop, deploy and manage a large number of connected devices and gateways, the Rigado Edge Connectivity Suite provides seamless integration between IoT devices and the Cloud. It includes:

  • BMD-340 angleCertified end device modules – Rigado modules (see photo) save connected product teams six months and $200K+ in design, test and certification. Fully Bluetooth 5 enabled, Rigado modules also feature mesh networking capabilities, ideal for applications like smart lighting, asset tracking, and connected retail.
  • Edge computing gateways – Rigado Vesta gateways manage connectivity to end devices and ensure data reaches public and private cloud services. They also support custom edge applications to process data and offer local device control. Flexible wireless options and customizability mean that companies can optimize their gateway for cost-effective enterprise deployment.
  • Cloud-based tools for secure deployment and updating– Companies require a scalable solution to securely manage updates to devices in the field. With that in mind, every Rigado gateway ships with Rigado’s provisioning and release management system that integrates with existing development tools for secure updating at scale.

Rigado | www.rigado.com

A Year in the Drone Age

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

When you’re trying to keep tabs on any young, fast-growing technology, it’s tempting to say “this is the big year” for that technology. Problem is that odds are the following year could be just as significant. Such is the case with commercial drones. Drone technology fascinates me partly because it represents one of the clearest examples of an application that wouldn’t exist without today’s level of chip integration driven by Moore’s law. That integration has enabled 4k HD video capture, image stabilization, new levels of autonomy and even highly compact supercomputing to fly aboard today’s commercial and consumer drones.

Beyond the technology side, drones make for a rich topic of discussion because of the many safety, privacy and regulatory issues surrounding them. And then there are the wide-open questions on what new applications will drones be used for?

For its part, the Federal Aviation Administration has had its hands full this year regarding drones. In the spring, for example, the FAA completed its fifth and final field evaluation of potential drone detection systems at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. The evaluation was the latest in a series of detection system evaluations that began in February 2016 at several airports. For the DFW test, the FAA teamed with Gryphon Sensors as its industry partner. The company’s drone detection technologies include radar, radio frequency and electro-optical systems. The FAA intends to use the information gathered during these kinds of evaluations to craft performance standards for any drone detection technology that may be deployed in or around U.S. airports.

In early summer, the FAA set up a new Aviation Rulemaking Committee tasked to help the agency create standards for remotely identifying and tracking unmanned aircraft during operations. The rulemaking committee will examine what technology is available or needs to be created to identify and track unmanned aircraft in flight.

This year as also saw vivid examples of the transformative role drones are playing. A perfect example was the role drones played in August during the flooding in Texas after Hurricane Harvey. In his keynote speech at this year’s InterDrone show, FAA Administrator Michael Huerta described how drones made an incredible impact. “After the floodwaters had inundated homes, businesses, roadways and industries, a wide variety of agencies sought FAA authorization to fly drones in airspace covered by Temporary Flight Restrictions,” said Huerta. “We recognized that we needed to move fast—faster than we have ever moved before. In most cases, we were able to approve individual operations within minutes of receiving a request.”

Huerta went on to described some of the ways drones were used. A railroad company used drones to survey damage to a rail line that cuts through Houston. Oil and energy companies flew drones to spot damage to their flooded infrastructure. Drones helped a fire department and county emergency management officials check for damage to roads, bridges, underpasses and water treatment plants that could require immediate repair. Meanwhile, cell tower companies flew them to assess damage to their towers and associated ground equipment and insurance companies began assessing damage to neighborhoods. In many of those situations, drones were able to conduct low-level operations more efficiently—and more safely—than could have been done with manned aircraft.

“I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that the hurricane response will be looked back upon as a landmark in the evolution of drone usage in this country,” said Huerta. “And I believe the drone industry itself deserves a lot of credit for enabling this to happen. That’s because the pace of innovation in the drone industry is like nothing we have seen before. If people can dream up a new use for drones, they’re transforming it into reality.”

Clearly, it’s been significant year for drone technology. And I’m excited for Circuit Cellar to go deeper with our drone embedded technology coverage in 2018. But I don’t think I’ll dare say that “this was the big year” for drones. I have a feeling it’s just one of many to come.

This appears in the December (329) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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Hop on the Moving Train

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShot

We work pretty far in advance to get Circuit Cellar produced and in your hands on-time and at the level of quality you expect and deserve. Given that timing, as we go to press on this issue we’re getting into the early days of fall. In my 27 years in the technology magazine business, this part of the year has always included time set aside to finalize next year’s editorial calendar. The process for me over years has run the gamut from elaborate multi-day summer meetings to small one-on-one conversations with a handful of staff. But in every case, the purpose has never been only about choosing the monthly section topics. It’s also a deeper and broader discussion about “directions.” By that I mean the direction embedded systems technologies are going in—and how it’s impacting you our readers. Because these technologies change so rapidly, getting a handle on it is a bit like jumping onto a moving train.

A well thought out editorial calendar helps us plan out and select which article topics are most important—for both staff-written and contributed articles. And because we want to include all of the most insightful, in-depth stories we can, we will continue to include a mix of feature articles beyond the monthly calendar topics. Beyond its role for article planning, a magazine’s editorial calendar also makes a statement on what the magazine’s priorities are in terms of technology, application segments and product areas. In our case, it speaks to the kind of magazine that Circuit Cellar is—and what it isn’t.

An awareness of what types of product areas are critical to today’s developers is important. But because Circuit Cellar is not just a generic product magazine, we’re always looking at how various chips, boards and software solutions fit together in a systems context. This applies to our technology trend features as well as our detailed project-based articles that explore a microcontroller-based design in all its interesting detail. On the other hand, Circuit Cellar isn’t an academic style technical journal that’s divorced from any discussion of commercial products. In contrast, we embrace the commercial world enthusiastically. The deluge of new chip, board and software products often help inspire engineers to take a new direction in their system designs. New products serve as key milestones illustrating where technology is trending and at what rate of change.

Part of the discussion—for 2018 especially—is looking at how the definition of a “system” is changing. Driven by Moore’s Law, chip integration has shifted the level of system functionally at the IC, board and box level. We see an FPGA, SoC or microcontroller of today doing what used to require a whole embedded board. In turn, embedded boards can do what once required a box full of slot-card boards. Meanwhile, the high-speed interconnects between those new “system” blocks constantly have to keep those processing elements fed. The new levels of compute density, functionality and networking available today are opening up new options for embedded applications. Highly integrated FPGAs, comprehensive software development tools, high-speed fabric interconnects and turnkey box-level systems are just a few of the players in this story of embedded system evolution.

Finally, one of the most important new realities in embedded design is the emergence of intelligent systems. Using this term in a fairly broad sense, it’s basically now easier than ever to apply high-levels of embedded intelligence into any device or system. In some cases, this means adding a 32-bit MCU to an application that never used such technology. At the other extreme are full supercomputing-level AI technologies installed in a small drone or a vehicle. Such systems can meet immense throughput and processing requirements in space-constrained applications handling huge amounts of real-time incoming data. And at both those extremes, there’s connectivity to cloud-based computing analytics that exemplifies the cutting edge of the IoT. In fact, the IoT phenomenon is so important and opportunity rich that we plan to hit it from a variety of angles in 2018.

Those are the kinds of technology discussions that informed our creation of Circuit Cellar’s 2018 Ed Cal. Available now on www.circuitcellar.com, the structure of the calendar has been expanded for 2018 to ensure we cover all the critical embedded technology topics important to today’s engineering professional. Technology changes rapidly, so we invite you to hop on this moving train and ride along with us.

This appears in the November (328) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine

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