Multi-Tasking Robot Platform

Fisnar F9960N

Fisnar F9960N

The F9960N multitasking robot is designed to dispense applications including miniature SMT circuit boards, large PCBs, and finished assemblies. The robot’s dispensing and coating system can be integrated within a conveyor-dependent inline manufacturing environment or installed as a stand-alone module.

The enclosed environment provides access for fume extraction systems, which creates a safeguard from potentially hazardous substances. Access to the working area is through a security door, which is locked while in operation but accessible during programming.

The robot includes a 178-mm touchscreen display that enables you to program a dispense path with unique characteristics (e.g., continuous path and point-to-point routing).

Contact Fisnar for pricing.

Fisnar, Inc.
www.fisnar.com

Low-Cost, High-Performance 32-bit Microcontrollers

The PIC32MX3/4 32-bit microcontrollers are available in 64/16-, 256/64-, and 512/128-KB flash/RAM configurations. The microcontrollers are coupled with Microchip Technology’s software and tools for designs in connectivity, graphics, digital audio, and general-purpose embedded control.

The microcontrollers offer high RAM memory options and high peripheral integration at a low cost. They feature 28 10-bit ADCs, five UARTS, 105-DMIPS performance, serial peripherals, a graphic display, capacitive touch, connectivity, and digital audio support.
The PIC32MX3/4 microcontrollers are supported with general software development tools, including Microchip Technology’s MPLAB X integrated development environment (IDE) and the MPLAB XC32 C/C++ compiler.

Application-specific tools include the Microchip Graphics Display Designer X and the Microchip Graphics Library, which provide a visual design tool that enables quick and easy creation of graphical user interface (GUI) screens for applications. The microcontrollers are also supported with a set of Microchip’s protocol stacks including TCP/IP, USB Device and Host, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi. For digital audio applications, Microchip provides software for tasks such as sample rate conversion (SRC), audio codecs—including MP3 and Advanced Audio Coding (AAC), and software to connect smartphones and other personal electronic devices.

The PIC32MX3/4 family is supported by Microchip’s PIC32 USB Starter Kit III, which costs $59.99 and the PIC32MX450 100-pin USB plug-in module, which costs $25 for the modular Explorer 16 development system. Pricing for the PIC32MX3/4 microcontrollers starts at $2.50 each in 10,000-unit quantities.

Microchip Technology, Inc.
www.microchip.com

Industrial Double-Break Switch for IP67/68

The MP220 is an industrial high-current switch. It features a single-pole, double-break electrical circuit that enables it to double break two independent electrical circuits.

The MP220 switch utilizes a fast snap action mechanism to transition from break-to-make position. The switch in its standard version is currently IP67 sealed. An improved sealing for IP68 applications with a strengthened cable exit is also available.

The MP220 is available in standard microswitch-size housing with a range of possible actuators and a four-wire potted cable. The switch is EN61058-certified for 250 VAC/10 A with a –40°C-to-130°C operating temperature range.

Contact Microprecision for pricing.

Microprecision Electronics SA
www.microprecision.ch

CC276: Not a Hockey Fan?

Hockey can be fun, unless you’re building a surface-mount device (SMD) prototype and the “puck” is one of the tiny components getting away from your soldering iron. In an article appearing last month in Circuit Cellar, “DIY?Surface-Mount Circuit Boards: Tips and Tricks for Building SMD Prototypes,” engineer James Lyman inadvertently sparked a bit of debate on the magazine’s website. Readers posted various alternatives to Lyman’s approach to the “SMD hockey” challenge. Here’s how Lyman’s article describes the problem and his solution:

“When I built my first few surface-mount boards, I did what so many amateurs and technicians do. I carefully placed each minute component on the circuit board in its correct position, and then spent several minutes playing ‘SMD hockey.’ With nothing holding the component in place, I’d take my soldering iron and heat the pad component while touching the solder to the junction. Just as the solder was about to melt, that little component would turn into a ‘puck’ and scoot away. Using the soldering iron’s tip as a ‘hockey stick,’ I’d chase the little puck back to its pads and try again, which was maddening…

“It slowly occurred to me that I needed something to hold each part in place while soldering—something that would glue them in place. Commercial houses glue the components down on the boards and then use a wave soldering machine, which does all the soldering at once. That’s exactly what I started doing. I use J-B Weld, a common off-the-shelf epoxy.”

Here is a sampling of alternative solutions readers posted to circuitcellar.com.

  • From Bill: “If you must use epoxy, then the cheapest fast-setting epoxy from Poundland will do the trick.
    “Personally, I’ve always used a tiny spot of cheapo CA superglue, which gives you 20-60 s to position the component. If there are a lot of SMDs on the board, you might want to use an accelerant spray to reduce the CA cure to 5 or 10 s. If you can’t afford proper CA accelerant, then isoprop or a gentle waft above the board with a cloth soaked in a little household ammonia will do the trick.”
  • From Trevor: ”I did a lot of hand soldering of SM parts years ago and agree that it is best to fix the parts before soldering.
    “I used an adhesive made for SM parts from RS Components, which comes in a syringe and is really easy to use. ” (Trevor’s post provides a link to his preferred Electrolube brand.)
  • From Kevin: ”Crikey, epoxying all the components first is a bit brutal. What if you want to change one? Melt the solder and twist, all at the same time?
    “Much easier to tin one pad, then place the part on it with tweezers and touch it with the iron, one end soldered fine, now solder the other end.”

Feel free to visit circuitcellar.com to weigh in or take some of the advice offered there.

DIY Surface-Mount Circuit Boards

James Lyman, an engineer with degrees in Aerospace, Electrical Engineering, and Systems Design, has more than 35 years of design experience but says he was “dragged” over the past decade into using surface-mount devices (SMD) in his prototypes. He had a preference for using through-hole technology whenever possible.

“The reasons are simple,” he says in an article appearing in the June issue of Circuit Cellar magazine. “It’s much easier to use traditional components for building and reworking prototype circuits than it is to use wire to make the connections. Plus, the devices are large and easy to handle. But time and technology don’t leave anyone at peace, so my projects have gradually drifted toward surface-mount design.”

In his article, Lyman shares the techniques he developed for designing prototypes using SMD components. He thought sharing what he learned would make the transition less daunting for other designers.

This accompanying photo shows one of his completed circuit board designs.

Lyman’s techniques developed out of trial and error. One trial involved keeping small components in place during the building of his prototype.

“When I built my first few surface-mount boards, I did what so many amateurs and technicians do. I carefully placed each minute component on the circuit board in its correct position, and then spent several minutes playing ‘SMD hockey,’ ” Lyman says. “With nothing holding the component in place, I’d take my soldering iron and heat the pad component while touching the solder to the junction. Just as the solder was about to melt, that little component would turn into a ‘puck’ and scoot away. Using the soldering iron’s tip as a ‘hockey stick,’ I’d chase the little puck back to its pads and try again, which was maddening. Finally, I’d get a drop of solder holding one end of the puck in place, usually with the other end sticking away from its pad. Then I could reheat the solder joint while holding the puck and position it correctly. I would have to start over with the next component, all the while yearning for that wonderful old through-hole technology.

“It slowly occurred to me that I needed something to hold each part in place while soldering—something that would glue them in place. Commercial houses glue the components down on the boards and then use a wave soldering machine, which does all the soldering at once. That’s exactly what I started doing. I use J-B Weld, a common off-the-shelf epoxy.”

Using an easy-to-get epoxy is just one of the tips in Lyman’s article. For the rest, check out his full article in the June issue of Circuit Cellar.