MCU-Based Prosthetic Arm with Kinect

James Kim—a biomedical student at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada—recently submitted an update on the status of an interesting prosthetic arm design project. The design features a Freescale 9S12 microcontroller and a Microsoft Kinect, which tracks arm movements that are then reproduced on the prosthetic arm.

He also submitted a block diagram.

Overview of the prosthetic arm system (Source: J. Kim)

Kim explains:

The 9S12 microcontroller board we use is Arduino form-factor compatible and was coded in C using Codewarrior.  The Kinect was coded in C# using Visual Studio using the latest version of Microsoft Kinect SDK 1.5.  In the article, I plan to discuss how the microcontroller was set up to do deterministic control of the motors (including the timer setup and the PID code used), how the control was implemented to compensate for gravitational effects on the arm, and how we interfaced the microcontroller to the PC.  This last part will involve a discussion of data logging as well as interfacing with the Kinect.

The Kinect tracks a user’s movement and the prosthetic arm replicates it. (Source: J. Kim, YouTube)

The system includes:

Circuit Cellar intends to publish an article about the project in an upcoming issue.

Organic Magnetism & Electronic Applications

Innovative researchers in Japan are looking closely at organic magnetism and how it can be applied to electronic systems. Could carbon-based organic materials eventually replace inorganic materials (i.e., silicon and other metals) in future electronic applications?

In a post titled “Organic Electronics: The Secret of Organic Magnets Unlocked” at TechTheFuture.com, Tessel Renzenbrink explains the results of exciting research by Japanese scientists studying the origin of magnetism in organic compounds. Tessel writes:

Organic light- emitting diodes (OLEDs) are already commercially in use in displays of mobile devices and significant progress has been made in applying organic photovoltaic cells to a light-weight flexible fabric to generate low-cost solar energy. But an entirely new range of applications is possible such as disposable biodegradable RFID tags and biomedical implants.

One of the limiting factors of organic materials is that they rarely exhibit magnetic properties because their atomic structure is fundamentally different from metals. But for electronic applications such as data storage and electric motors magnetism is essential.

Now a team of scientists from the RIKEN research center has established an exact theoretical model which could aid materials scientists to develop organic magnetic materials.

You can read the entire post at TechTheFuture.com.

TechTheFuture.com is part of the Elektor group.