Electronics Engineering Crossword (Issue 263)

Across

1.     SPARKGAP—A space in an otherwise closed electric circuit [two words]

3.     FUZZYLOGIC—Began in 1965 with Lotfi Zadeh’s proposal of a certain type of set theory [two words]

6.     NULLTEST—Cancels a device’s signal input by negative feedback from its output [two words]

7.     COULOMB—One of these is equal to 6.28 x 1018 electrons

10.   EDDYCURRENT—A.k.a. Foucault currents [two words]

11.   KIRCHHOFF—Created a law of thermochemistry

13.   ANDGATE—Relies on truth and logic  [two words]

16.   HOLONYAK—Invented the LED while working at General Electric in the 1960s

17.   SOLIDSTATERELAY—Doesn’t rely on movement or contact to switch electric circuits [three words]

20.   ACCIRCUIT—A circuit with a current that goes one way and then another [two words]

Down

2.     ANNEAL—Run hot and cold

4.     OPTOISOLATOR—Changes electrical signals to light and back into electrical signals

5.     CHECKBIT—Adds a bit to make things even or odd [two words]

8.     MICROFARAD—1,000,000 pF

9.     THEVENIN—French engineer (1857–1926); augmented Ohm’s law

12.   KELVINSCALE—Temperature scale where 0° = absolute zero [two words]

14.   PHOTODIODE—Turns light into current or voltage

15.   ACORNTUBE—A small tube used at very high frequencies [two words]

18.   ERG—Causes 1 cm of movement

19.   ASCII—A character-encoding system used to represent text

 

Issue 263: Net-Enabled Controller, MCU-Based Blood Pressure Cuff, MOSFETs 101, & More

Although the June issue is still in production, I can report that it’s packed with projects and tips you’ll find immediately applicable. The projects include an AC tester design, an Internet-enabled controller, a DIY image-processing system, and an MCU-cased blood pressure cuff. Once you’ve had your fill of design projects, you’ll benefit from our articles on essential topics such as concurrency embedded systems, frequency mixers, MOSFET channel resistance, and “diode ORing.”

An Internet-Enabled Controller, by Fergus Dixon
Power-saving smart switches require a real-time clock-based controller. With a request for an Ethernet interface, the level of complexity increases. Once the Ethernet interface was working, connecting to the Internet was simple, but new problems arose.

Final PCB with a surface-mount Microchip Technology ENC28J60 Ethernet chip (Source: F. Dixon, CC263)

AC Tester, Kevin Gorga
The AC Tester provides a modular design approach to building a tool for repair or prototyping line voltage devices. In its simplest form, it provides an isolated variable AC voltage supply. The next step incorporates digital current and voltage meters with an electronic circuit breaker. The ultimate adds an energy meter for Watts, VA, and VAR displays.

The AC Tester powered up and running. The E meter is shown in the plastic case on the top of the tester. The series current limit bulbs are on the top. (Source: K. Gorga, CC263)

Image Processing System Development, by Miguel Sánchez
Some computer vision tasks can be accomplished more easily with the use of a depth camera. This article presents the basics on the usage of Microsoft’s Kinect motion-sensing device on your PC for an interactive art project.

Build an MCU-Based Automatic Blood Pressure Cuff, by Jeff Bachiochi
Personal health products are becoming more and more commonplace. They reinforce regular visits to personal physicians, and can be beneficial when diagnosing health issues. This article shows you how to convert a manual blood pressure cuff into an automatic cuff by adding an air pump, a solenoid release valve, and a pressure sensor to a Microchip Technology PIC-based circuit.

A manual blood pressure cuff adapted into an automatic cuff by adding an air pump, a solenoid release valve, and a pressure sensor to a microcontroller. (Source: J. Bachiochi, CC263)

Concurrency in Embedded Systems, by Bob Japenga
This is the first in an article series about concurrency in embedded systems. This article defines concurrency in embedded systems, discusses some pitfalls, and examines one of them in detail.

Radio Frequency Mixers, by Robert Lacoste
Frequency mixers are essential to radio frequency (RF) designs. They are responsible for translating a signal up or down in frequency. This article covers the basics of RF mixers, their real-life applications, and the importance of frequency range.

MOSFET Channel Resistance: Theory and Practice, by Ed Nisley
This article describes the basics of power MOSFET operation and explores the challenges of using a MOSFET’s drain-to-source resistance as a current-sensing resistor. It includes a review of fundamental enhancement-mode MOSFET equations compared with Spice simulations, and shows measurements from an actual MOSFET.

Diode ORing, by George Novacek
Diode ORing is a commonly used method for power back up. But there is a lot more behind the method than meets the eye. This article describes some solutions for maintaining uninterrupted power.

The June issue will hit newsstands in late May.

Robot Design with Microsoft Kinect, RDS 4, & Parallax’s Eddie

Microsoft announced on March 8 the availability of Robotics Developer Studio 4 (RDS 4) software for robotics applications. RDS 4 was designed to work with the Kinect for Windows SDK. To demonstrate the capabilities of RDS 4, the Microsoft robotics team built the Follow Me Robot with a Parallax Eddie robot, laptop running Windows 7, and the Kinect.

In the following short video, Microsoft software developer Harsha Kikkeri demonstrates Follow Me Robot.

Circuit Cellar readers are already experimenting Kinect and developing embedded system to work with it n interesting ways. In an upcoming article about a Kinect-based project, designer Miguel Sanchez describes a interesting Kinect-based 3-D imaging system.

Sanchez writes:

My project started as a simple enterprise that later became a bit more challenging. The idea of capturing the silhouette of an individual standing in front of the Kinect was based on isolating those points that are between two distance thresholds from the camera. As depth image already provides the distance measurement, all the pixels of the subject will be between a range of distances, while other objects in the scene will be outside of this small range. But I wanted to have just the contour line of a person and not all the pixels that belong to that person’s body. OpenCV is a powerful computer vision library. I used it for my project because of function blobs. This function extracts the contour of the different isolated objects of a scene. As my image would only contain one object—the person standing in front of the camera—function blobs would return the exact list of coordinates of the contour of the person, which was what I needed. Please note that this function is a heavy image processing made easy for the user. It provides not just one, but a list of all the different objects that have been detected in the image. It can also specify is holes inside a blob are permitted. It can also specify the minimum and maximum areas of detected blobs. But for my project, I am only interested in detecting the biggest blob returned, which will be the one with index zero, as they are stored in decreasing order of blob area in the array returned by the blobs function.

Though it is not a fault of blobs function, I quickly realized that I was getting more detail than I needed and that there was a bit of noise in the edges of the contour. Filtering out on a bit map can be easily accomplished with a blur function, but smoothing out a contour did not sound so obvious to me.

A contour line can be simplified by removing certain points. A clever algorithm can do this by removing those points that are close enough to the overall contour line. One of these algorithms is the Douglas-Peucker recursive contour simplification algorithm. The algorithm starts with the two endpoints and it accepts one point in between whose orthogonal distance from the line connecting the two first points is larger than a given threshold. Only the point with the largest distance is selected (or none if the threshold is not met). The process is repeated recursively, as new points are added, to create the list of accepted points (those that are contributing the most to the general contour given a user-provided threshold). The larger the threshold, the rougher the resulting contour will be.

By simplifying a contour, now human silhouettes look better and noise is gone, but they look a bit synthetic. The last step I did was to perform a cubic-spline interpolation so contour becomes a set of curves between the different original points of the simplified contour. It seems a bit twisted to simplify first to later add back more points because of the spline interpolation, but this way it creates a more visually pleasant and curvy result, which was my goal.

 

(Source: Miguel Sanchez)
(Source: Miguel Sanchez)

The nearby images show aspects of the process Sanchez describes in his article, where an offset between the human figure and the drawn silhouette is apparent.

The entire article is slated to appear in the June or July edition of Circuit Cellar.