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Automating Coding Standards

Security vulnerabilities can put users at risk and damage companies’ reputations, and these risks increase as more devices are connected to the internet. Download this white paper to learn how to choose and enforce the best coding standard for your application to reduce these risks.
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Coding Standards and Security

Coding standards are proven to improve code quality, but without automation they are difficult to enforce and may be ignored by developers. Download this white paper to learn how to create a coding standard from existing resources and use a static analyzer to ensure it is followed by your developers.
Automating Coding Standards

Security vulnerabilities can put users at risk and damage companies’ reputations, and these risks increase as more devices are connected to the internet. Download this white paper to learn how to choose and enforce the best coding standard for your application to reduce these risks.
How to Choose the Right Coding Standard for Embedded Software Security 


Free white papers: How to Choose the Right Coding Standard for Embedded Software Security and Automating Coding Standards sponsored by PRQA

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Vintage Programming Languages

For the last 30 years, C has been my programming language of choice. As you probably know, C was invented in the early 1970s by Dennis M. Ritchie for the first UNIX kernel and ran on a DEC PDP-11 computer. I am probably a bit old-fashioned. Yes, C is outdated, but I’m simply addicted to it, like plenty of other embedded system programmers. For me, C is a low level but portable language that’s adequate for all my professional and personal projects ranging from optimized code on microcontrollers to signal processing or even PC software. I know that there are many powerful alternatives like Java and C++, but, well, I’m used to C.

C is not the only vintage programming language, and playing with some others is definitively fun. This month, I’ll present several vintage languages and show you that each language has its pros and cons. Maybe you’ll find one of them helpful for a future project? I’m sure you won’t use COBOL in your next device, but what about FORTH or LISP? As you’ll see, thanks to web-based compilers and simulators, playing with programming languages is simple. And after you’re finished with this review of 1970s-era computing technology, give one or two a try!

BASIC

Like many teenagers in the 1970s, I learned to program with Beginner’s All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC). In 1980, after some early tests with programming calculators, a friend let me try a Rockwell AIM-65 computer. An expanded version of the KIM-1, it had an impressive 1 KB of RAM and a BASIC interpreter in ROM. It was my first contact with a high-level programming language. I was really astonished. This computer seemed to understand me! “Print 1+1.” “Ok, that’s 2.” One year later, I bought my first computer, an Apple II. It came with a much more powerful BASIC interpreter in ROM, AppleSoft Basic. (This interpreter was developed for Apple by a small company named Microsoft, but that’s another story.)

PHOTO 1: An online emulator for my old Apple II

PHOTO 1: An online emulator for my old Apple II

Now let’s launch an Apple II emulator and write some software for it. Look at Photo 1. Nice, isn’t it? This pretty emulator, developed in JavaScript by Will Scullin, is available online. Just launch it, enter this 10-line program, and then type “RUN”. It will calculate for you the factorial of eight: 8! = 1 × 2 × 3 × 4 × 5 × 6 × 7 × 8, which is 40,320.

Since its invention in 1964 at Dartmouth College, BASIC is more of a concept than a well-specified language. Plenty of variants exist up to Microsoft’s Visual Basic. But it has plenty of disadvantages, especially its early versions: a lack of structured data and controls, mandatory line numbering, a lack of type checking, low speed, and so on. Nevertheless, it is ultra-simple to learn and to understand. Even if you have never used BASIC, you’ll understand the code shown in Photo 1 without any problem. The main program starts by initializing a variable N with the value 8. I then calls a subprogram that starts at line 100, displays the result F, and stops. The subprogram initializes F to 1 and multiplies the result by each integer up to N. Straightforward.

C LANGUAGE

Let compare this BASIC with a C version of the same algorithm. For this article, I looked for online compilers and simulators. I found a great option at www.ideone.com, which, developed by Sphere Research Labs, supports more than 60 programming languages. You can edit a program using any of them, compile it, and test it without having to install anything on your PC. This is great for experimenting.

PHOTO 2: At Ideone.com, you can enter, compile, and simulate numerous programming languages. Here you see C language.

PHOTO 2: At Ideone.com, you can enter, compile, and simulate numerous programming languages. Here you see C language.

The C variant of the factorial algorithm is depicted in Photo 2. I could have used plenty of different approaches, but I tried to stay as close as possible to the “spirit” of C. So, how does it compare with BASIC? The code is significantly more structured, but a little harder to read. C aficionados loves short forms like f*=i++ (which multiplies f by i and then increments i) even when they can be avoided. While this makes the code shorter and helps the compiler with optimization, it is probably cryptic to someone new to the language.

Of course, C also has great strengths. In particular, it offers you precise control of the data types and memory representation, which helps for low level programming. That’s probably why it has been so widely for nearly 50 years.

FORTRAN & COBOL

Let’s stay in the 1970s. BASIC or assembly language was for hobbyists and experimenters. C was used by early UNIX programmers. The rest of the programming world was divided into two camps. Scientifics used FORTRAN. Business leaders used COBOL.

FORTRAN (from FORmula TRANslation) was actually the first high-level programming language. Developed by an IBM team led by John Backus, the first version of FORTRAN was released in 1957 for the IBM 704 computer. It was followed by several incremental improvements: Fortran 66 (1966), Fortran 77, and Fortran 90, all the way up to Fortran 2008. Refer to Listing 1 for the factorial program using FORTRAN 77.

LISTING 1: This is the factorial program using FORTRAN 77.

LISTING 1: This is the factorial program using FORTRAN 77.

It seems close to BASIC, right? That’s not a surprise as BASIC was in fact based on concepts from FORTRAN and from another disapeared language, ALGOL. I’m sure that you are able to read and understand the FORTRAN in Listing 1, but its equivalent in COBOL is a bit stranger (see Listing 2). I must admit that it took me some time to make it working, even after reading some COBOL tutorials on the web. COBOL is an acronym for Common Business-Oriented Language, so it is not exactly targeting an application like a factorial calculation. It was developed in 1959 by a consortium named CODASYL, based on works from Grace Hopper. Even though its popularity fading, COBOL is still alive. I even read that an object-oriented version was released in 2002 (COBOL 2002) and even upgraded in 2014.

LISTING 2: The COBOL version looks a little stranger, right?

LISTING 2: The COBOL version looks a little stranger, right?

PASCAL & FRIENDS

I never actually used FORTRAN or COBOL, but I developed software on my Apple II using PASCAL. Released in 1970 by Niklaus Wirth (ETH Zurich, Swizerland), PASCAL was probably one of the earliest efforts to encourage structured and typed programming. Based on ALGOL-W (also invented by Wirth), it was followed by MODULA-2 and OBERON, which were less known but still influential.

Do you want to calculate a factorial in PASCAL? Here it is Listing 3. It may look familiar to FORTRAN or BASIC, but its advantages are in the details. PASCAL is a so-called strongly typed language. (You can’t add a tomato and a donut, contrarily to C.) It also forbids unstructured programming and it is very easy to read. PASCAL was a limited, but true, success. It was used in particular by Apple for the development of the Lisa computer as well as the first versions of the Macintosh. It is still in use today through one of its object-oriented versions, DELPHI.

LISTING 3: This is the PASCAL version. Easy to read.

LISTING 3: This is the PASCAL version. Easy to read.

THE ADA STORY

In the 1970s, the United States Department of Defense (DoD) conducted a survey and found that they were using no less than 450 different programming languages. So, it decided to define and develop yet another one—that is, a new language to replace all of them. After long specification and selection phases, a proposal from Jean Ichbiah (CII Honeywell Bull, France) was selected. The result was ADA. The name ADA, and its military standard reference (MIL-STD-1815), are in memory of Augusta Ada, Countess of Lovelace (1815–1852), who created of the first actual algorithms intended for a machine.

While ADA is, well, strongly typed and very powerful, it’s complex and quite boring to use (see Listing 4). The key advantage of ADA is that it is well standardized and supports constructs like concurrency. Thanks to its very formal syntax and type checking, it is nearly bug-proof. Based on my minimal experience, it is so strict that the first version of the code usually works, at least after you correct hundreds of compilation errors. That’s probably why it is still largely used for critical applications ranging from airplanes to military systems, even if it failed as a generic language.

LISTING 4: ADA is more verbose.

LISTING 4: ADA is more verbose.

LISP & FORTH

ADA is a difficult language. In my opinion, LISP (List Processing) is far more interesting. It is an old story too. Designed in 1960 by John McCarthy (Stanford University), its concepts are still interesting to learn. McCarthy’s goal was to develop a simple language with full capabilities. That’s quite the opposite of ADA. The result was LISP. The syntax can be frightening, but you must try it. Listing 5 is a version of the factorial calculation in LISP.

LISTING 5: LISP is definitively fun!

LISTING 5: LISP is definitively fun!

In LISP, everything is a list, and a list is enclosed between parentheses. To execute a function, you have to create a list with a pointer to the function as a first element and then the parameters. For example, (- n 1) is a list that calculates n – 1. (if A B C) is a structure which evaluates A, and then evaluates either B or C based on the value of A. If you read this program, you will see that it is not based on a loop like all other versions I’ve presented, but on a concept called recursion. A factorial of a number is calculated as 1 if the number is 0, and as N times the factorial of (N – 1) otherwise. LISP was in fact the first language to support recursion—meaning, the possibility for a function to call itself again and again. It is also the first language to manage storage automatically, using garbage collection. Even more interesting, in LISP everything is a list, even a program. So in LISP, it is possible to develop a program that generates a program and executes it!

Another of my favorites is FORTH. Designed by Charles Moore in 1968, FORTH also supports self-modifying programs like LISP, and it is probably even more minimalist. FORTH is based on the concept of a stack, and operators push and pop data from this stack. It uses a postfix syntax, also named Reversed Polish Notation, like vintage Hewlett-Packard calculators. For example, 1 2 + . means “push 1 on the stack,” “push 2 on the stack,” “get two figures from the stack, add them and put the result back on the stack,” and “get a figure from the stack and display it.”

Here is our factorial program in FORTH:

: fact dup 1 do I * loop ; 8 fact .

The first line defines a new function named fact, and the second line executes it after pushing the value 8 on the stack. The syntax is of course a bit strange due to the postfixing but it is clear after a while. Let’s start with 8 on the stack. The command dup duplicates the top of the stack. The do…loop structure gets count and first index from the stack so it executes I * with I varying from 1 to 7, and each iteration multiplies the top of the stack by the index I. That’s it. You can try it using another web-based programming and simulation host: https://repl.it. Look at the result in Photo 3.

PHOTO 3: This is an example of FORTH in the Repl.it online compiler and simulator.

PHOTO 3: This is an example of FORTH in the Repl.it online compiler and simulator.

FUN WITH PROLOG & APL

LISP and FORTH are fun, but PROLOG is stranger. Developed by Alain Colmerauer and his team in 1972, PROLOG is the first of the so-called declarative languages. Rather than specifying an algorithm, such a declarative language defines facts and rules. It then lets the system determine if another fact can be deduced from them. An example is welcome.

LISTING 6: The PROLOG version based on a completely different paradigm.

LISTING 6: The PROLOG version based on a completely different paradigm.

Listing 6 is our factorial in PROLOG. The first fact states that the factorial of any number lower than 2 is 1. The second fact states that the factorial of any number X is F only if F is the product of X and another number, named here FM1, and if FM1 is the factorial of X – 1. This looks like a recursion, and this is recursion, but expressed differently. Then the last line states that X is the factorial of 8 and ask PROLOG to display X, and you will have the result. This is a confusing approach, but it is close to the needs of artificial intelligence algorithms.

Lastly, I can’t resist to the pleasure to show you another exotic vintage programming language, A Programming Language (APL). Refer to the factorial example in APL in Photo 4. I can’t even write it in the text of this article because APL uses nonstandard characters.

PHOTO 4: APL looks great, right? It’s unique keyboard alone is fun!

PHOTO 4: APL looks great, right? It’s unique keyboard alone is fun!

In fact, APL-enabled computers had APL-specific keyboards! Published in 1962 by Kenneth Iverson (Harvard University and then IBM), it was firstly a mathematical notation and then a programming language. Based largely on data arrays, APL targets numerical calculations so it isn’t a surprise to see that our factorial example is so compact in this language. Let’s understand it by reading the first line from right to left. The omega Greek symbol is the parameter of the function (that is, 8 in this case). The small symbol just before the omega called “iota” is generating a vector from 0 to N – 1, so here it is generating 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. The 1+ is adding one to each element of the array. This gives 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8. Lastly, the x/ asks to multiply each value of the vector, which is the factorial!

GET STARTED

After finishing this article, I searched the web for other interesting languages and found, well, a more than impressive website. Launch your browser right now and enter http://rosettacode.org. These crazy guys simply listed 837 programming tasks, and let the community program each of them with all programming languages. Yes, all of them, and no less than 648 different languages are referenced! Of course, I searched for a factorial calculation algorithm and found it. Versions of the factorial code for 220 different languages are provided! So, you can find similar versions to the ones I provided in this article as versions for more recent languages (Java, Python, Perl, etc.). You will also find obscure languages.

My goal with this article was to show you that languages other than C and JAVA can be fun and even helpful for specific projects. Vintage languages are not dead. For example, it seems that FORTH was used for NASA’s Rosetta mission. Moreover, innovation in computing languages goes on, and new and exciting alternatives are proposed every month!

Don’t hesitate to play with and test programming languages. The web is an invaluable tool for discovering new tools, so have fun!

This article appears in Circuit Cellar 323.

Robert Lacoste lives in France, between Paris and Versailles. He has 30 years of experience in RF systems, analog designs, and high speed electronics. Robert has won prizes in more than 15 international design contests. In 2003 he started a consulting company, ALCIOM, to share his passion for innovative mixed-signal designs. Robert’s bimonthly Darker Side column has been published in Circuit cellar since 2007.

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Multi-Zone Home Audio System

Dave Erickson built his first multi-zone audio system in the early 1990s using C microprocessor code he developed on Freescale MC68HC11 microprocessors. The system has been an important part of his home.

“I used this system for more than 15 years and was satisfied with its ability to send different sounds to the different rooms in my house as well as the basement and the deck,” he says. “But the system needed an upgrade.”

In Circuit Cellar’s January and February issues, Erickson describes how he upgraded the eight-zone system, which uses microprocessor-controlled analog circuitry. In the end, his project not only improved his home audio experience, it also won second place in a 2011 STMicroelectronics design contest.

Several system components needed updating, including the IR remote, graphic LCD, and microprocessor. “IR remotes went obsolete, so the IR codes needed to change,” Erickson says. “The system was 90% hand-wired and pretty messy. The LCD and several other parts became obsolete and the C development tools had expired. Processors had evolved to include flash memory and development tools evolved beyond the old burn-and-pray method.”

“My goal was to build a modern, smaller, cleaner, and more efficient system,” he says. “I decided to upgrade it with a recent processor and LCD and to use real PC boards.”

Photo 1: Clockwise from the upper left, the whole-house system includes the crosspoint board, two quad preamplifiers, two two-zone stereo amplifiers, an AC transformer, power supplies, and the CPU board with the STMicroelectronics STM32VLDISCOVERY board.

Photo 1: Clockwise from the upper left, the whole-house system includes the crosspoint board, two quad preamplifiers, two two-zone stereo amplifiers, an AC transformer, power supplies, and the CPU board with the STMicroelectronics STM32VLDISCOVERY board.

Erickson chose the STMicroelectronics STM32F100 microprocessor and the work incentive of a design contest deadline (see Photo 1).

“STMicroelectronics’s excellent libraries and examples helped me get the complex ARM Cortex-M3 peripherals working quickly,” he says. “Choosing the STM32F100 processor was a bit of overkill, but I hoped to later use it to add future capabilities (e.g., a web page and Ethernet control) and possibly even a simple music server and audio streaming.”

In Part 1 of the series, Erickson explains the design’s audio sections, including the crosspoint board, quad preamplifiers, modular audio amplifiers, and packaging. He also addresses challenges along the way.

Erickson’s Part 1 provides the following overview of the system, including its “analog heart”—the crosspoint board:

Figure 1 shows the system design including the power supplies, front-panel controls, and the audio and CPU boards. The system is modular, so there is flexibility in the front-panel controls and the number of channels and amplifiers. My goal was to fit it all into one 19”, 2U (3.5”) high rack enclosure.

The CPU board is based on a STM32F100 module containing a Cortex-M3-based processor and a USB programming interface. The CPU receives commands from a front-panel keypad, an IR remote control, an encoder knob, RS-232, and external keypads for each zone. It displays its status on a graphic LCD and controls the audio circuitry on the crosspoint and two quad preamplifier boards.

The system block diagram shows the boards, controls, amplifiers, and power supplies.

The system block diagram shows the boards, controls, amplifiers, and power supplies.


Photo 2 shows the crosspoint board, which is the analog heart of the system. It receives line-level audio signals from up to eight stereo sources via RCA jacks and routes audio to the eight preamplifier channels located on two quad preamplifier boards. It also distributes digital control and power to the preamplifiers. The preamplifier boards can either send line-level outputs or drive stereo amplifiers, either internal or external to the system.

My current system uses four line-level outputs to drive PCs or powered speakers in four of the zones. It also contains internal 40-W stereo amplifiers to directly drive speakers in the four other zones. Up to six stereo amplifiers can reside in the enclosure.

Photo 2: The crosspoint board shows the RCA input jacks (top), ribbon cable connections to the quad preamplifiers (right), and control and power cable from the CPU (bottom). Rev0 has a few black wires (lower center).

Photo 2: The crosspoint board shows the RCA input jacks (top), ribbon cable connections to the quad preamplifiers (right), and control and power cable from the CPU (bottom). Rev0 has a few black wires (lower center).

DIYers dealing with signal leakage issues in their projects may learn something from Erickson’s approach to achieving low channel-to-channel crosstalk and no audible digital crosstalk. “The low crosstalk requirement is to prevent loud music in one zone from disturbing quiet passages in another,” he says.

In Part 1, Erickson explains the crosspoint and his “grounding/guarding” approach to transmitting high-quality audio, power, and logic control signals on the same cable:

The crosspoint receives digital control from the CPU board, receives external audio signals, and distributes audio signals to the preamplifier boards and then on to the amplifiers. It was convenient to use this board to distribute the control signals and the power supply voltages to the preamplifier channels. I used 0.1” dual-row ribbon cables to simplify the wiring. These are low-cost and easy to build.

To transmit high-quality audio along with power and logic control signals on the same cable, it is important to use a lot of grounds. Two 34-pin cables each connect to a quad preamplifier board. In each of these cables, four channels of stereo audio are sent with alternating signals and grounds. The alternating grounds act as electric field “guards” to reduce crosstalk. There are just two active logic signals: I2C clock and data. Power supply voltages (±12 and 5 V) are also sent to the preamplifiers with multiple grounds to carry the return currents.

I used a similar grounding/guarding approach throughout the design to minimize crosstalk, both from channel to channel and from digital to analog. On the two-layer boards, I used ground planes on the bottom layer. Grounded guard traces or ground planes are used on the top layer. These measures minimize the capacitance between analog traces and thus minimize crosstalk. The digital and I2C signals are physically separated from analog signals. Where they need to be run nearby, they are separated by ground planes or guard traces.

To find out more about how Erickson upgraded his audio system, download the January issue (now available online) and the upcoming February issue. In Part 2, Erickson focuses on his improved system’s digital CPU, the controls, and future plans.

Registration to Attend the 2014 Design and Verification Conference

Registration to attend the 2014 Design and Verification Conference (DVCon) opens December 6, 2013. The conference will be held March 3-6, 2014, at the DoubleTree Hotel in San Jose, California.

DVCon is a premier conference for the application of languages, tools, and methodologies for the design and verification of electronic systems and integrated circuits, according to the website dvcon.org. DVCon primarily focuses on the practical use of specialized design and verification languages such as SystemC,  SystemVerilog and e, assertions in SVA or PSL, as well as the use of AMS languages, design automation using IP-XACT,  and the  use of general-purpose languages C and C++.

Conference attendees are generally designers of electronic systems, ASICs and FPGAs, as well as those involved in the research, development and application of EDA tools.  The 2013 conference drew a record turnout. Overall attendance rose to 883, including full conference and exhibit only registration.

If you are interested in attending the conference,  becoming a DVCon exhibitor, or obtaining more information about DVCon, please visit the conference website.  

DVCon is sponsored by Accellera Systems Initiative, an independent, nonprofit industry consortium dedicated to the development and standardization of design and verification languages. The organization accelerates standards development, and as part of its ongoing partnership with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), its standards are contributed to the IEEE Standards Association for formal standardization and ongoing change control.

Solar Array Tracker (Part 1): SunSeeker Hardware

Figure 1: These are the H-bridge motor drivers and sensor input conditioning circuits. Most of the discrete components are required for transient voltage protection from nearby lightning strikes and inductive kickback from the motors.

Figure 1: These are the H-bridge motor drivers and sensor input conditioning circuits. Most of the discrete components are required for transient voltage protection from nearby lightning strikes and inductive kickback from the motors.

Graig Pearen, semi-retired and living in Prince George, BC, Canada, spent his career in the telecommunications industry where he provided equipment maintenance and engineering services. Pearen, who now works part time as a solar energy technician, designed the SunSeeker Solar Array tracker, which won third place in the 2012 DesignSpark chipKit challenge.

He writes about his design, as well as changes he has made in prototypes since his first entry, in Circuit Cellar’s October issue. It is the first part of a two-part series on the SunSeeker, which presents the system’s software and commissioning tests in the final installment.

In the opening of Part 1, Pearen describes his objectives for the solar array tracker:

When I was designing my solar photovoltaic (PV) system, I wanted my array to track the sun in both axes. After looking at the available commercial equipment specifications and designs published online, I decided to design my own array tracker, the SunSeeker (see Photo 1 and Figure 1).

I had wanted to work with a Microchip Technology PIC processor for a while, so this was my opportunity to have some fun. I based my first prototype on a PIC16F870 microcontroller but when the microcontroller maxed out, I switched to its big brother, the PIC16F877. Although both prototypes worked well, I wanted to add more features and

The SunSeeker board, at top, contains all the circuits required to control the solar array’s motion. This board plugs into the Microsoft Technology chipKIT MAX32 processor board. The bottom side of the SunSeeker board (green) with the MAX32 board (red) plugged into it is shown at bottom.

The SunSeeker board, at top, contains all the circuits required to control the solar array’s motion. This board plugs into the Microchip Technology chipKIT MAX32 processor board. The bottom side of the SunSeeker board (green) with the MAX32 board (red) plugged into it is shown at bottom.

capabilities. I particularly wanted to add Ethernet access so I could use my home network to communicate with all my systems. I was considering Microchip’s chipKIT Max32 board for the next prototype when Circuit Cellar’s DesignSpark chipKIT contest was announced.

I knew the contest would be challenging. In addition to learning about a new processor and prototyping hardware, the contest rules required me to learn a new IDE (MPIDE), programming language (C++), schematic capture, and PCB design software (DesignSpark PCB). I also decided to make this my first surface-mount component design.

My objective for the contest was to replicate the functionality of the previous Assembly language software. I wanted the new design to be a test platform to develop new features and tracking algorithms. Over the next two to three years of development and field testing, I plan for it to evolve into a full-featured “bells-and-whistles” solar array tracker. I added a few enhancements as the software evolved, but I will develop most of the additional features later.

The system tracks, monitors, and adjusts solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays based on weather and atmospheric conditions. It compiles statistics on these conditions and communicates with a local server that enables software algorithm refinement. The SunSeeker logs a broad variety of data.

The SunSeeker measures, displays, and records the duration of the daily sunny, hazy, and cloudy periods; the array temperature; the ambient temperature; daily minimum and maximum temperatures; incident light intensity; and the drive motor current. The data log is indexed by the day number (1–366). Index–0 is the annual data and 1–366 store the data for each day of the year. Each record is 18 bytes long for a total of 6,588 bytes per year.

At midnight each day, the daily statistics are recorded and added to the cumulative totals. The data logs can be downloaded in comma-separated values (CSV) format for permanent record keeping and for use in spreadsheet or database programs.

The SunSeeker has two main parts, a control module and a separate light sensor module, plus the temperature and snow sensors.

The control module is mounted behind the array where it is protected from the heat of direct sunlight exposure. The sensor module is potted in clear UV-proof epoxy and mounted a few centimeters away on the edge of, and in the same plane as, the array. To select an appropriate potting compound, I contacted Epoxies, Etc. and asked for a recommendation. Following the company’s advice, I obtained a small quantity of urethane resin (20-2621RCL) and urethane catalyst (20-2621CCL).

When controlling mechanical devices, monitoring for proper operation, and detecting malfunctions it is necessary to prevent hardware damage. For example, if the solar array were to become frozen in place during an ice storm, it would need to be sensed and acted upon. Diagnostic software watches the motors to detect any hardware fault that may occur. Fault detection is accomplished in several ways. The H-bridges have internal fault detection for over temperature, under voltage, and shorted circuit. The current drawn by the motors is monitored for abnormally high or low current and the motor drive assemblies’ pulses are counted to show movement and position.

To read more about the DIY SunSeeker solar array tracker, and Pearen’s plans for further refinements, check out the October issue.

 

Client Profile: Custom Computer Services (CCS), Inc.

Custom Computer Services (CCS), Inc.
Spring City Drive
Waukesha, WI 53186

www.ccsinfo.com

Contact: Sales, sales@ccsinfo.com

Embedded Products/Services: CCS specializes in embedded software and hardware development tools. Available to the development community is a range of solutions for Microchip Technology microcontrollers, and digital signal controllers (DSCs), that include: C compilers, prototyping boards, development kits, and programmers/debuggers. CCS also offers custom engineering services and a line of embedded Ethernet devices (e.g., EZ Web Lynx). For more information visit www.ccsinfo.com.

Product Information: The CCSC Version 5 compiler with all of its new features and enhancements has just been released! Version 5 is the first release to include an aggressive code optimizer, plus a dynamic C Profiler tool. Other enhancements include:

  • New libraries—generate relevant and tight code for a specific application. Included are: RS-232, RS-485, PWM, timers, a capacitive touchpad, and more.
  • C++ stream operator support—C++ streams provide a unified interface for I/O and data formatting.
  • Serial port monitor—a graphing capability enables real-time graphing at a PC from a Microchip Technology PIC microcontroller program. For more information on Version 5, visit www.ccsinfo.com/version5

Exclusive Offer: For Circuit Cellar readers, CCS is offering $60 off the purchase price of any development kit. Development kits include: the IDE C Compiler, prototyping board, an ICD-U64 debugger/programmer, a breadboard with auxiliary parts, a power supply, and cables. Call the sales department at 262-522-6500 ext. 35 and mention the promo code CC60, or visit www.ccsinfo.com and use the promo code CC60 in your cart. This offer is valid until August 31, 2013.

Custom Computer Services, Inc.

Client Profile: ARM, Ltd.

ARM, Ltd.

ARM, Ltd.
110 Fulbourn Road
Cambridge, GB-CB1 9NJ,
Great Britain

www.arm.com
www.arm.com/tools

Contact: sales.us@keil.com

Embedded Products/Services: The ARM tools range offers two software development families that provide you with all the necessary tools for every stage of your software development workflow.

ARM Development Studio 5 (DS-5) provides best-in-class tools for a broad range of ARM processor-based platforms, including application processors and multicore SoCs. Find out more by visiting www.arm.com/products/tools/software-tools/ds-5/index.php.

Keil MDK-ARM is a complete software development toolkit for ARM processor-based microcontrollers. It is the right choice for embedded applications based on the ARM Cortex-M series, ARM7, ARM9, and Cortex-R4 processors. To find out more, visit www.arm.com/products/tools/software-tools/mdk-arm/index.php.

Product Information: The MDK-ARM is a complete software development environment for Cortex-M, Cortex-R4, ARM7, and ARM9 processor-based devices. MDK-ARM is specifically designed for microcontroller applications. It is easy to learn and use, yet powerful enough for the most demanding embedded applications.

The MDK-ARM is available in four editions: MDK-Lite, MDK-Basic, MDK-Standard, and MDK-Professional. All editions provide a complete C/C++ development environment and MDK-Professional includes extensive middleware libraries.

MCU-Based Prosthetic Arm with Kinect

James Kim—a biomedical student at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada—recently submitted an update on the status of an interesting prosthetic arm design project. The design features a Freescale 9S12 microcontroller and a Microsoft Kinect, which tracks arm movements that are then reproduced on the prosthetic arm.

He also submitted a block diagram.

Overview of the prosthetic arm system (Source: J. Kim)

Kim explains:

The 9S12 microcontroller board we use is Arduino form-factor compatible and was coded in C using Codewarrior.  The Kinect was coded in C# using Visual Studio using the latest version of Microsoft Kinect SDK 1.5.  In the article, I plan to discuss how the microcontroller was set up to do deterministic control of the motors (including the timer setup and the PID code used), how the control was implemented to compensate for gravitational effects on the arm, and how we interfaced the microcontroller to the PC.  This last part will involve a discussion of data logging as well as interfacing with the Kinect.

The Kinect tracks a user’s movement and the prosthetic arm replicates it. (Source: J. Kim, YouTube)

The system includes:

Circuit Cellar intends to publish an article about the project in an upcoming issue.