FCC/CE/IC-Certified Bluetooth SMART Beacons

EM Microelectronic’s EMBC01 Bluetooth beacon recently achieved FCC certification for operation within the US, as well as IC certification in Canada and CE certification for operation in the European Union. You can use the compact EMBC01 beacon anywhere iBeacon and Bluetooth Smart v4.0 technologies are implemented.

Source: EM Microelectronic

Source: EM Microelectronic

EMBC01 features, specs, and capabilities:

  • Consumes less than 25 µA average current in a typical application
  • Operates up to 12 months from a single CR2032 battery
  • Includes ultra-low-power EM6819 microprocessor
  • Contains a built-in mode switch
  • Includes an integrated red and green LEDs for status feedback
  • Includes a miniature antenna
  • Detects beacons 75 m away by an iPhone 5S at the 0-dBm output power setting
  • Detects beacons up to 120 m at maximum output power
  • Includes optimized circuit architecture that protects against over-the-air attacks
  • Ships preprogrammed with a Renata CR2032 battery and an IP-64-certified, weatherproof plastic enclosure

The EMBC01, the EMBC01 Development Kit, and accessories are currently available. Contact EM Microelectronic for pricing.

Source: EM Microelectronic

 

 

Cypress Enters Bluetooth Low Energy Market

Cypress Semiconductor announced at Electronica 2014 two integrated, single-chip Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) solutions for low-power, sensor-based Internet of Things (IoT) systems: the PSoC 4 and PRoC.

Cypress BLE Pioneer Kit

Cypress BLE Pioneer Kit

According to Cypress, the PSoC 4 BLE delivers “unprecedented ease-of-use and integration in a customizable solution for IoT applications, home automation, healthcare equipment, sports and fitness monitors, and other wearable smart devices.” The PRoC (programmable radio-on-chip) is “intended for wireless Human Interface Devices (HIDs), remote controls, and applications that require wireless connectivity.”

Cypress also announced BLE development kits and reference designs.

  • CY8CKIT-042-BLE Development Kit: The kit includes a USB BLE dongle that “pairs with the CySmart master emulation tool, converting a designer’s Windows PC into a Bluetooth LE debug environment.”
  • CY5672 PRoC BLE Remote Control Reference Design Kit: The remote control has a trackpad to detect two- and one-finger gestures and includes a built-in microphone.
  • CY5682 PRoC BLE Touch Mouse Reference Design Kit: The touch mouse reference design includes buttons that map to common user interface shortcuts for Windows 8.

According to Cypress, the PSoC 4 BLE and PRoC BLE solutions are currently sampling in 68-ball CSP and 56-pin QFN packages.  Production is expected in December 2014.

Source: Cypress Semiconductor

Embedded Bluetooth Modules for the Internet of Things

ASIX Electronics Corp. has launched five AXB series embedded Bluetooth modules, the AXB031/AXB033 for Internet of Things applications and the AXB051/AXB052/AXB081 for wireless audio applications. You can connect the AXB modules to any MCU with UART interface, or you can operate it as a standalone unit without an MCU.ASIX-BT_Modules

The Bluetooth 4.0 AXB031 and AXB033 modules are well suited for wearable applications, such as medical sensors and activity monitors, as well as commercial/industrial automation and smart home applications.

According to the company’s release, ASIX offers “developers a full-featured Bluetooth Smart stacks and application development environment to make it easy to add Bluetooth Smart to embedded system. In addition, ASIX also provides a dual-mode Bluetooth 4.0 audio module, AXB081, and two Bluetooth 3.0 audio modules, AXB051/AXB052, for the fast-growing wireless audio applications, such as wireless stereo speakers, headphones, home theater, automotive hands-free, and MirrorLink car player applications.”

Source: ASIX

Bluetooth Haptic Kit

Texas Instruments recently introduced an innovative wireless haptic development kit. The DRV2605EVM-BT haptic Bluetooth kit comprises a 32-mm square PCB containing a DRV2605 haptic driver chip that controls an eccentric rotating mass motor (ERM) and a linear resonant actuator (LRA) to produce vibrations. The DRV2605 has an integrated library with more than 100 effects licensed from Immersion Corp.

Texas Instruments DRV2605EVM-BT haptic Bluetooth kit

Texas Instruments DRV2605EVM-BT haptic Bluetooth kit

You can use a circle of LEDs to display visual alerts. The board might be useful to speed up development times when designing and testing haptic effects in applications such as: watches, fitness trackers, wearables, portable medical equipment, touch screens, displays, and other devices requiring tactile feedback.

A SimpleLink Bluetooth low-energy CC2541 wireless microcontroller communicates with a free iOS app running on an iPhone or iPad. The app allows you to play predefined library waveforms, create new waveform sequences, and assign waveform sequences to in-app notifications. The app can also be used to quickly configure the DRV2605’s internal register settings: select between an ERM or LRA actuator, set the rated and overdrive voltages, configure and run autocalibration, send direct I2C commands, as well as set up the board to respond to a GPIO trigger.

The DRV2605EVM-BT haptic Bluetooth kit costs $99.

Source: Texas Instruments

New PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit

Microchip Technology recently announced the new PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit, which is intended for low-cost applications such as a Bluetooth thermostat, wireless diagnostic tools, and Bluetooth GPS receivers. According to Microchip, the kit includes “a PIC32 microcontroller, HCI-based Bluetooth radio, Cree high-output multi-color LED, three standard single-color LEDs, an analog three-axis accelerometer, analog temperature sensor, and five push buttons for user-defined inputs.”

PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit (Source: Microchip Technology)

PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit (Source: Microchip Technology)

PICkit On Board (PKOB) eliminates the need for an external debugger/programmer, USB connectivity, and GPIOs for rapid development of Bluetooth Serial Port Profile (SPP), USB and general-purpose applications.  The starter kit also features a plug-in interface for an audio CODEC daughter card. The kit’s PIC32MX270F256D microcontroller operates at 83 DMIPS with 256-KB flash memory and 64-KB RAM.

The PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit is supported by Microchip’s free MPLAB X IDE and MPLAB Harmony Integrated Software Framework.  Additionally, the free Quick Start Package is available with an Android application development environment. It also includes a free SDK with the application source code and binary for Microchip’s Bluetooth SPP library.  Both are optimized for the on-board PIC32 MCU and are available for free at www.microchip.com/get/1AVL.

 

The PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit costs $79.99.

RN4020 Bluetooth Smart Module

Microchip Technology recently announced its first Bluetooth 4.1 Low Energy module, the RN4020, which carries both worldwide regulatory certifications and is Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) certified. The integrated Bluetooth Low Energy (BTLE) stack and on-board support for the common SIG low-energy profiles speeds time to market while ensuring Bluetooth compatibility, eliminating expensive certification costs and reducing development risks. The module comes preloaded with the Microchip Low-energy Data Profile (MLDP), which enables designers to easily stream any type of data across the BTLE link. MicrochipRN4020

The RN4020 is a stack-on-board module, so it can connect to any microcontroller with a UART interface, including hundreds of PIC MCUs, or it can operate standalone without an MCU for basic data collection and communication, such as a beacon or sensor. Standalone operation is facilitated by Microchip’s unique no-compile scripting, which allows module configuration via a simple ASCII command interface—no tools or compiling are required.

The RN4020 Bluetooth Low Energy Module is available for $6.78 each in 1,000-unit quantities.

[Via Microchip Technology]

July Issue Offers Data-Gathering Designs and More

The concept of the wireless body-area network (WBAN), a network of wireless wearable computing devices, holds great promise in health-care applications.

Such a network could integrate implanted or wearable sensors that provide continuous mobile health (mHealth) monitoring of a person’s most important “vitals”—from calorie intake to step count, insulin to oxygen levels, and heart rate to blood pressure. It could also provide real-time updates to medical records through the Internet and alert rescue or health-care workers to emergencies such as heart failures or seizures.

Data Gathering DesignsConceivably, the WBAN would need some sort of controller, a wearable computational “hub” that would track the data being collected by all the sensors, limit and authorize access to that information, and securely transmit it to other devices or medical providers.

Circuit Cellar’s July issue (now available online for membership download or single-issue purchase)  features an essay by Clemson University researcher Vivian Genaro Motti, who discusses her participation in the federally funded Amulet project.

Amulet’s Clemson and Dartmouth College research team is prototyping pieces of “computational jewelry” that can serve as a body-area network’s mHealth hub while being discreetly worn as a bracelet or pendant. Motti’s essay elaborates on Amulet’s hardware and software architecture.

Motti isn’t the only one aware of the keen interest in WBANs and mHealth. In an interview in the July issue, Shiyan Hu, a professor whose expertise includes very-large-scale integration (VLSI), says that many of his students are exploring “portable or wearable electronics targeting health-care applications.”

This bracelet-style Amulet developer prototype has an easily accessible board.

This bracelet-style Amulet developer prototype has an easily accessible board.

Today’s mHealth market is evident in the variety of health and fitness apps available for your smartphone. But the most sophisticated mHealth technologies are not yet accessible to embedded electronics enthusiasts. (However, Amulet has created a developer prototype with an easily accessible board for tests.)

But market demand tends to increase access to new technologies. A BCC Research report predicts the mHealth market, which hit $1.5 billion in 2012, will increase to $21.5 billion by 2018. Evolving smartphones, better wireless coverage, and demands for remote patient monitoring are fueling the growth. So you can anticipate more designers and developers will be exploring this area of wearable electronics.

AND THAT’S NOT ALL…
In addition to giving you a glimpse of technology on the horizon, the July issue provides our staple of interesting projects and DIY tips you can adapt at your own workbench. For example, this issue includes articles about microcontroller-based strobe photography; a thermal monitoring system using ANT+ wireless technology; a home solar-power setup; and reconfiguring and serial backpacking to enhance LCD user interfaces.

We’re also improving on an “old” idea. Some readers may recall contributor Tom Struzik’s 2010 article about his design for a Bluetooth audio adapter for his car (“Wireless Data Exchange: Build a 2,700-lb. Bluetooth Headset,” Circuit Cellar 240).

In the July issue, Struzik writes about how he solved one problem with his design: how to implement a power supply to keep the phone and the Bluetooth adapter charged.

“To run both, I needed a clean, quiet, 5-V USB-compatible power supply,” Struzik says. “It needed to be capable of providing almost 2 A of peak current, most of which would be used for the smartphone. In addition, having an in-car, high-current USB power supply would be good for charging other devices (e.g., an iPhone or iPad).”

Struzik’s July article describes how he built a 5-V/2-A automotive isolated switching power supply. The first step was using a SPICE program to model the power supply before constructing and testing an actual circuit. Struzik provides something extra with his article: a video tutorial explaining how to use Linear Technology’s LTspice simulator program for switching design. It may help you design your own circuit.

This is Tom Struzik's initial test circuit board, post hacking. A Zener diode is shown in the upper right, a multi-turn trimmer for feedback resistor is in the center, a snubber capacitor and “stacked” surface-mount design (SMD) resistors are on the center left, USB D+/D– voltage adjust trimmers are on top center, and a “test point” is shown in the far lower left. If you’re looking for the 5-V low dropout (LDO) regulator, it’s on the underside of the board in this design.

This is Tom Struzik’s initial test circuit board, post hacking. A Zener diode is shown in the upper right, a multi-turn trimmer for feedback resistor is in the center, a snubber capacitor and “stacked” surface-mount design (SMD) resistors are on the center left, USB D+/D– voltage adjust trimmers are on top center, and a “test point” is shown in the far lower left. If you’re looking for the 5-V low dropout (LDO) regulator, it’s on the underside of the board in this design.

 

ARM mbed Platform for Bluetooth Smart Applications

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe nRF51822-mKIT simplifies and accelerates the prototyping process for Bluetooth Smart sensors connecting to the Internet of Things (IoT). The platform is designed for fast, easy, and flexible development of Bluetooth Smart applications.

The nRF51822 system-on-chip (SoC) combines a Bluetooth v4.1-compliant 2.4-GHz multiprotocol radio with an ARM Cortex-M0 CPU core on a single chip optimized for ultra-low-power operation. The SoC simplifies and accelerates the prototyping process for Bluetooth Smart sensors connecting to the IoT.

The nRF51822-mKIT’s features include a Bluetooth Smart API, 31 pin-assignable general-purpose input/output (GPIO), a CMSIS-DAP debugger, Programmable Peripheral Interconnect (PPI), and the ability to run from a single 2032 coin-cell battery.

Through mbed, the kit is supported by a cloud-based approach to writing code, adding libraries, and compiling firmware. A lightweight online IDE operates on all popular browsers running on Windows, Mac OSX, iOS, Android, and Linux OSes. Developers can use the kit to access a cloud-based ARM RVDS 4.1 compiler that optimizes code size and performance.

The nRF51822-mKIT costs $59.95.

Nordic Semiconductor ASA
www.nordicsemi.com

Client Profile: Invenscience LC

Invenscience2340 South Heritage Drive, Suite I
Nibley UT, 84321

CONTACT: Collin Lewis, sales@invenscience.com
invenscience.com

EMBEDDED PRODUCTS: Torxis Servos and various servo controllers

FEATURED PRODUCT: Invenscience features a wide range of unique servo controllers that generate the PWM signal for general RC servomotors of all brands and Torxis Servos. (The Simple Slider Servo Controller is pictured.) Included in this lineup are:

  • Gamer joystick controllers
  • Conventional joystick controllers
  • Equalizer-style slider controllers
  • Android device Bluetooth controllers

All of these controllers provide power and the radio control (RC) PWM signal necessary to make servos move without any programming effort.

EXCLUSIVE OFFER: Use the promo code “CC2014” to receive a 10% discount on all purchases through March 31, 2014.

Circuit Cellar prides itself on presenting readers with information about innovative companies, organizations, products, and services relating to embedded technologies. This space is where Circuit Cellar enables clients to present readers useful information, special deals, and more.

The Adafruit Learning System Releases Bluetooth HID Keyboard Controller

Bluefruit2Adafruit’s Bluefruit EZ-Key enables you to create a wireless Bluetooth keyboard controller in an hour. The module acts as a Bluetooth keyboard and is compatible with any Bluetooth-capable device (e.g., Mac, Windows, Linux, iOS, and Android).

You simply power the Bluefruit EZ-Key with 3 to 16 VDC and pair it to a computer, tablet, or smartphone. You can then connect buttons from the 12 input pins. When a button is pressed, it sends a keypress to the computer. The module has been preprogrammed to send the four arrow keys, return, space, “w,” “a,” “s,” “d,” “1,” and “2” by default. Advanced users can use a Future Technology Devices International (FTDI) chip or other serial console cable to reprogram the module’s keys for a human interface device (HID) key report.

BluefruitEach Bluefruit EZ-Key has a unique identifier. More than one module can be paired to a single device. The FCC- and CE-certified, RoHS-compliant modules integrate easily into your project.

Pricing for the Bluefruit EZ-Key begins at $19.95. For more information, visit The Adafruit Learning System. Bluefruit EZ-Key tutorials are also available.

Low-Cost, High-Performance 32-bit Microcontrollers

The PIC32MX3/4 32-bit microcontrollers are available in 64/16-, 256/64-, and 512/128-KB flash/RAM configurations. The microcontrollers are coupled with Microchip Technology’s software and tools for designs in connectivity, graphics, digital audio, and general-purpose embedded control.

The microcontrollers offer high RAM memory options and high peripheral integration at a low cost. They feature 28 10-bit ADCs, five UARTS, 105-DMIPS performance, serial peripherals, a graphic display, capacitive touch, connectivity, and digital audio support.
The PIC32MX3/4 microcontrollers are supported with general software development tools, including Microchip Technology’s MPLAB X integrated development environment (IDE) and the MPLAB XC32 C/C++ compiler.

Application-specific tools include the Microchip Graphics Display Designer X and the Microchip Graphics Library, which provide a visual design tool that enables quick and easy creation of graphical user interface (GUI) screens for applications. The microcontrollers are also supported with a set of Microchip’s protocol stacks including TCP/IP, USB Device and Host, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi. For digital audio applications, Microchip provides software for tasks such as sample rate conversion (SRC), audio codecs—including MP3 and Advanced Audio Coding (AAC), and software to connect smartphones and other personal electronic devices.

The PIC32MX3/4 family is supported by Microchip’s PIC32 USB Starter Kit III, which costs $59.99 and the PIC32MX450 100-pin USB plug-in module, which costs $25 for the modular Explorer 16 development system. Pricing for the PIC32MX3/4 microcontrollers starts at $2.50 each in 10,000-unit quantities.

Microchip Technology, Inc.
www.microchip.com

Member Profile: Steve Hendrix

Steve Hendrix

Location: Sagamore Hills, OH (located between Cleveland and Akron)

Education: BS, United States Air Force Academy, El Paso County, CO

Occupation: Steve began moonlighting as an engineering consultant in 1979. He has been a full-time consultant since 1992.

Member Status: He says he has been a subscriber since “forever.” He remembers reading the Circuit Cellar columns in Byte magazine.

Technical Interests: Steve enjoys embedded design, from picoamps to kiloamps, from nanovolts to kilovolts, from microhertz to gigahertz, and from nanowatts to kilowatts.
Current Projects: He is working on eight active professional projects. Most of his projects involve embedding Microchip Technology’s PIC18 microcontroller family.

Some of Steve’s projects include Texas Instruments Bluetooth processors and span all the previously mentioned ranges in the interfacing hardware. Steve says he is also working on a personal project involving solar photovoltaic power.

Thoughts on the Future of Embedded Technology: Steve thinks of embedded technology as “a delicate balancing act: time spent getting the technology set up vs. time we would spend to do the same job manually; convenience and connectivity vs. privacy, time, and power saved vs. energy consumed; time developing the technology vs. its payoffs; and connectedness with people far away vs. with those right around us.” Additionally, he says there are always the traditional three things to balance “good, fast, cheap—choose two!”

AAR Arduino Autonomous Mobile Robot

The AAR Arduino Robot is a small autonomous mobile robot designed for those new to robotics and for experienced Arduino designers. The robot is well suited for hobbyists and school projects. Designed in the Arduino open-source prototyping platform, the robot is easy to program and run.

The AAR, which is delivered fully assembled, comes with a comprehensive CD that includes all the software needed to write, compile, and upload programs to your robot. It also includes a firmware and hardware self test. For wireless control, the robot features optional Bluetooth technology and a 433-MHz RF.

The AAR robot’s features include an Atmel ATmega328P 8-bit AVR-RISC processor with a 16-MHz clock, Arduino open-source software, two independently controlled 3-VDC motors, an I2C bus, 14 digital I/Os on the processor, eight analog input lines, USB interface programming, an on-board odometer sensor on both wheels, a line tracker sensor, and an ISP connector for bootloader programming.

The AAR’s many example programs help you get your robot up and running. With many expansion kits available, your creativity is unlimited.

Contact Global Specialties for pricing.

Global Specialties
http://globalspecialties.com

The Future of Data Acquisition Technology

Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio

Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio

By Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio

Data acquisition is a necessity, which is why data acquisition systems and software applications are essential tools in a variety of fields. For instance, research scientists rely on data acquisition tools for testing and measuring their laboratory-based projects. Therefore, as a data acquisition system designer, you must have an in-depth understanding of each part of the systems and programs you create.

I mainly design data acquisition software for physics-related experiments and industrial applications. Today’s complicated physics experiments require highly complex data acquisition systems and software that are capable of managing large amounts of information. Many of the systems require high-speed connections and digital recording. And they must be reconfigurable. Signals that are hard to characterize and analyze with a real-time display are evaluated in terms of high frequencies, large dynamic range, and gradual changes.

Data acquisition software is typically available in a text-based user interface (TUI) that comprises an ASCII configuration file and a graphic user interface (GUI), which are generally available with any web browser. Both interfaces enable data acquisition system management and customization, and you don’t need to recompile the sources. This means even inexperienced programmers can have full acquisition control.

Well-designed data acquisition and control software should be able to quickly recover from instrumentation failures and power outages without losing any data. Data acquisition software must provide a high-level language for algorithm design. Moreover, it requires data-archiving capability for verifying data integrity.

You have many data acquisition software options. An example is programmable software that uses a language such as C. Other software and data acquisition software packages enable you to design the custom instrumentation suited for specific applications (e.g., National Instruments’s LabVIEW and MathWorks’s MATLAB).

In addition to data acquisition software design, I’ve also been developing embedded data acquisition systems with open-source software to manage user-developed applications. The idea is to have credit-card-sized embedded data acquisition systems managing industrial systems using open-source software written in C. I’m using an ARM processor that will give me the ability to add small boards for specific applications (e.g., a board to manage data transmission via Wi-Fi or GSM).

A data acquisition system’s complexity tends to increase with the number of physical properties it must measure. Resolution and accuracy requirements also affect a system’s complexity. To eliminate cabling and provide for more modularity, you can combine data acquisition capabilities and signal conditioning in one device.

Recent developments in the field of fiber-optic communications have shown longer data acquisition transmission distances can cause errors. Electrical isolation is also an important topic. The goal is to eliminate ground loops (common problems with single-ended measurements) in terms of accuracy and protection from voltage spikes.

During the last year, some new technological developments have proven beneficial to the overall efficacy of data acquisition applications. For instance, advances in USB technology have made data acquisition and storage simpler and more efficient than ever (think “plug and play”). Advances in wireless technology have also made data transmission faster and more secure. This means improved data acquisition system and software technologies will also figure prominently in smartphone design and usage.

If you look to the future, consumer demand for mobile computing systems will only increase, and this will require tablet computers to feature improved data acquisition and storage capabilities. Having the ability to transmit, receive, and store larger amounts of data with tablets will become increasingly important to consumers as time goes on. There are three main things to consider when creating a data acquisition-related application for a tablet. Hardware connectivity: Tablets have few control options (e.g., Wi-Fi and Bluetooth). Program language support: Many tablets support Android apps created in Java. Device driver availability: Device drivers permit a high-level mode to easily and reliably execute a data acquisition board’s functionality. C and LabVIEW are not supported by Android or Apple’s iOS. USB, a common DAQ bus, is available in a set of tablets. In the other case, an adapter is required. In these instances, moving a possible data acquisition system to a tablet requires extra attention.

For all of the aforementioned reasons, I think field-programmable arrays (FPGAs) will figure prominently in the evolution of data acquisition system technology. The flexibility of FPGAs makes them ideal for custom data acquisition systems and embedded applications.