Cloud Platform Supports BeagleBone Black Dev Kit

Anaren IoT Group has announced the release of version 2.1 of its innovative Anaren Atmosphere online development platform. Atmosphere affords embedded, mobile and cloud developers an exceptionally fast way to create IoT applications with an easy-to-use IoT development environment. The new version of Atmosphere 2.1, now offers support for the BeagleBone Black Embedded Linux Development Kit, as well as a new cloud-only project type that allows users to build libraries for C#/.Net, C/C++, and Python to enable connections to their own embedded solutions in Atmosphere Cloud.

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As with version 2.0, users of Atmosphere 2.1 are able to simultaneously create and deploy corresponding hosted web applications. All design functions, including cloud visualization, use a drag-and-drop approach that does not require the need for command line coding – although code can be customized if desired. Atmosphere 2.1 also provides access to a large and growing library of sensors and other IoT elements for easy application creation. Atmosphere’s unique approach immediately accelerates design cycles, lowers risk, while removing cost in the development process as no specialized knowledge in hardware embedded coding, mobile application creation or web development is needed.

Atmosphere 2.1 can also host device and sensor data in its cloud-based environment and offers a highly customizable web-based user interface. The Atmosphere Cloud™ hosting option allows each user to host up to five devices at once – free of charge. The Atmosphere toolset is ideal for a variety of developers – from those who are simply looking to record single sensor data to those developing rich, complex device monitoring and control applications.

Anaren IoT | www.anaren.com/iot

An Organized Space for Programming, Writing, and Soldering

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Photo 1—This is Anderson’s desk when he is not working on any project. “I store all my ‘gear’ in a big plastic bin with several smaller bins inside, which keeps the mess down. I have a few other smaller storage bins as well hidden here and there,” Anderson explained.

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Photo 2—Here is Anderson’s area set up for soldering and running his oscilloscope. “I use a soldering mat to protect my desk surface,” he says. “The biggest issue I have is the power cords from different things getting in my way.”

Al Anderson’s den is the location for a variety of ongoing projects—from programming to writing to soldering. He uses several plastic bins to keep his equipment neatly organized.

Anderson is the IT Director for Salish Kootenai College, a small tribal college based in Pablo, MT. He described some of his workspace features via e-mail:

I work on many different projects. Lately I have been doing more programming. I am getting ready to write a book on the Xojo development system.

Another project I have in the works is using a Raspberry Pi to control my hot tub. The hot tub is about 20 years old, and I want to have better control over what it is doing. Plus I want it to have several features. One feature is a wireless interface that would be accessible from inside the house. The other is a web control of the hot tub so I can turn it on when we are still driving back from skiing to soak my tired old bones.

I am also working on a home yard sprinkler system. I laid some of the pipe last fall and have been working on and off with the controller. This spring I will put in the sprinkler heads and rest of the pipe. I tend to like working with small controllers (e.g., the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBoard’s BeagleBone, and Arduino) and I have a lot of those boards in various states.

Anderson’s article about a Raspberry Pi-based monitoring device will appear in Circuit Cellar’s April issue. You can follow him on Twitter at @skcalanderson.