CC277: (Re)Discovering Embedded

Authors in this issue range from a columnist who reintroduces us to the advantages of switched-capacitor filters to a frequent contributor who discusses his first encounter—and project—with the credit card-sized Raspberry Pi computer.

Columnist Robert Lacoste recently rediscovered one of his 1981 Elektor magazines, which included an article on switched-capacitor filters. “Since mastering switched-capacitor filters is now mandatory for many mixed-signal designs, I thought: Why not refresh the topic for a Circuit Cellar Darker Side article?” Lacoste says. Beginning on page 56, Lacoste shows you how to modify a simple one-pole RC filter into a switched-capacitor filter.

Frequent contributor Brian Millier placed his name on a waiting list to purchase his first Raspberry Pi. He finally received it in late 2012 and started the project that would inspire his two-part series “Raspberry Pi I/O?Board” (p. 42). The series explores the strengths and weaknesses of the single-board computer (SBC)?and explains the versatile I/O board he developed for it. “In the time since I received my Raspberry Pi, one of the board’s developers has designed an I/O board called the Gertboard. I feel my board is quite distinct and has some advantages over the Gertboard,” Millier says.

Speaking of the Raspberry Pi’s developers, this issue includes an interview with “RPi hardware guy” Peter Lomas (p. 38). He looks at the growth in popularity of the Raspberry Pi since its initial launch and shares how the nonprofit Raspberry Pi Foundation plans to foster its mission of promoting the $35 SBC as a tool to teach children computer skills and encourage inventiveness.

This month’s issue offers many other interesting reads. For example, columnist Jeff Bachiochi continues his series on creating user-friendly graphic displays. Part 1 focused on the microcontroller used to create his serial display. Part 2 discusses implementing dynamic button commands (p. 70).

In Part 4 of his “Testing and Testability” series (p. 52), columnist George Novacek explains the importance of an electronic system’s internal diagnostics. In addition, columnist Bob Japenga wraps up his “Concurrency in Embedded Systems” series by focusing on file usage (p. 48). “Modern embedded systems are doing more than I ever imagined when I first started,” Japenga says. “Adding a file system to your design can provide significant advantages to improve your product.”

This issue also presents two more final installments. One describes how to use a DSP-SQL interface to access large amounts of data (p. 20). The other outlines a DIY SBC project (p. 30).


Editor’s Note: The Client Profile focusing on Beta LAYOUT in Circuit Cellar’s June issue (p. 16) included incorrect information. Tony Shoot can be reached at tony@beta-layout.us. Visit circuitcellar.com/featured/client-profile-beta-layouts online to see the full profile.

CC 277: (Re)Discovering Embedded

Authors in this issue range from a columnist who reintroduces us to the advantages of switched-capacitor filters to a frequent contributor who discusses his first encounter—and project—with the credit card-sized Raspberry Pi computer.

Columnist Robert Lacoste recently rediscovered one of his 1981 Elektor magazines, which included an article on switched-capacitor filters. “Since mastering switched-capacitor filters is now mandatory for many mixed-signal designs, I thought: Why not refresh the topic for a Circuit Cellar Darker Side article?” Lacoste says. Beginning on page 56, Lacoste shows you how to modify a simple one-pole RC filter into a switched-capacitor filter.

Frequent contributor Brian Millier placed his name on a waiting list to purchase his first Raspberry Pi. He finally received it in late 2012 and started the project that would inspire his two-part series “Raspberry Pi I/O?Board” (p. 42). The series explores the strengths and weaknesses of the single-board computer (SBC)?and explains the versatile I/O board he developed for it. “In the time since I received my Raspberry Pi, one of the board’s developers has designed an I/O board called the Gertboard. I feel my board is quite distinct and has some advantages over the Gertboard,” Millier says.

Speaking of the Raspberry Pi’s developers, this issue includes an interview with “RPi hardware guy” Peter Lomas (p. 38). He looks at the growth in popularity of the Raspberry Pi since its initial launch and shares how the nonprofit Raspberry Pi Foundation plans to foster its mission of promoting the $35 SBC as a tool to teach children computer skills and encourage inventiveness.

This month’s issue offers many other interesting reads. For example, columnist Jeff Bachiochi continues his series on creating user-friendly graphic displays. Part 1 focused on the microcontroller used to create his serial display. Part 2 discusses implementing dynamic button commands (p. 70).

In Part 4 of his “Testing and Testability” series (p. 52), columnist George Novacek explains the importance of an electronic system’s internal diagnostics. In addition, columnist Bob Japenga wraps up his “Concurrency in Embedded Systems” series by focusing on file usage (p. 48). “Modern embedded systems are doing more than I ever imagined when I first started,” Japenga says. “Adding a file system to your design can provide significant advantages to improve your product.”

This issue also presents two more final installments. One describes how to use a DSP-SQL interface to access large amounts of data (p. 20). The other outlines a DIY SBC project (p. 30).


Editor’s Note: The Client Profile focusing on Beta LAYOUT in Circuit Cellar’s June issue (p. 16) included incorrect information. Tony Shoot can be reached at tony@beta-layout.us. Visit circuitcellar.com/featured/client-profile-beta-layouts online to see the full profile.

CC275: Shape The Future

In January, Circuit Cellar introduced a new section, Tech the Future, which dedicates page 80 of our magazine to the insights of innovators in groundbreaking technologies.

We’ve reached out to a number of graduate students, professors, researchers, engineers, designers, and entrepreneurs, asking them to write short essays on their fields of expertise, with an emphasis on future trends.

Their topics have included high-speed data acquisition, Linux home automation, research into new materials to replace traditional silicon-based CMOS for circuitry design, control system theory for electronic device DIYers, and how open-source hardware will make world economies more democratic and efficient.

Our contributors have been diverse in more than just their topics. They have been talented

Tech the Future essayist Fergus Dixon designed this DNA sequencer, the subject of an article in the May 2013 issue of Circuit Cellar.

young researchers and seasoned professionals. Male and female. American, Portuguese, Italian, Indian, and Australian.

The one thing they have in common? They keep a close eye on the ever-changing landscape of technological change. And their essays have helped our readers focus on what to watch. We compensate authors for the essays we choose to publish, and we are eager to hear your suggestions on subjects for Tech the Future.

If you are an innovator interested in writing an essay for Tech the Future, e-mail me (editor@circuitcellar.com) with the topic you’d like to address and some information about yourself. If you are a reader who wants to hear from someone in particular through Tech the Future or has a suggestion for an essay topic, please contact me.

The work of those we’ve featured so far can be found online at circuitcellar.com/category/tech-the-future. Here are just a few of the innovators you will find there:

Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio, a designer of data acquisition software for physics-related experiments and industrial applications, discussing the future of data acquisition technology.

Saptarshi Das, a nano materials researcher who holds a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University, focusing on the urgent need for alternatives to silicon-based CMOS. These alternative materials, now the subject of extensive scientific research, will be game changers for the microelectronics and nanoelectronics industries, he says.

Fergus Dixon, an Australian entrepreneur and designer of the popular software program “Simulator for Arduino,” explaining why open-source hardware is a valuable tool in the development of new medical devices. Design opportunities for such devices are countless. Hot technologies developed for 3-D printing and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have direct medical applications, including 3-D-printed prosthetic ears and nanorobots that utilize UAV technology.

Enjoy these articles and others online. In the meantime, I’ll be checking my e-mail for what you would like to see featured in Tech the Future.