New JukeBlox Wi-Fi Platform for Streaming Audio

Microchip Technology’s fourth-generation JukeBlox platform enables product developers to build low-latency systems, such as wireless speakers, sound bars, AV receivers, micro systems, and more. The JukeBlox 4 Software Development Kit (SDK) in combination with the CY920 Wi-Fi & Bluetooth Network Media Module features dual-band Wi-Fi technology, multi-room features, AirPlay and DLNA connectivity, and integrated music services.

Microchip-JukeBlox-Wifi

Streaming audio with JukeBlox

The CY920 module is based on Microchip’s DM920 Wi-Fi Network Media Processor, which features 2.4- and 5-GHz 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi, high-speed USB 2.0 and Ethernet connectivity. By using the 5-GHz band, speakers aren’t impacted by the RF congestion found in the 2.4-GHz band.

The DM920 processor also features integrated dual 300-MHz DSP cores that can reduce or eliminate the need for costly standalone DSP chips. An PC-based GUI simplifies the use of a predeveloped suite of standard speaker-tuning DSP algorithms, including a 15-band equalizer, multiband dynamic range compression, equalizer presets, and a variety of filter types. Even if you don’t have DSP coding experience, you can implement DSP into your designs.

JukeBlox 4 enables you to directly stream cloud-based music services, such as Spotify Connect and Rhapsody, while using mobile devices as remote controls. Mobile devices can be used anywhere in the Wi-Fi network without interrupting music playback. In addition, JukeBlox technology offers cross-platform support for iOS, Android, Windows 8, and Mac, along with a complete range of audio codecs and ease-of-use features to simplify network setup.

The JukeBlox 4 SDK, along with the JukeBlox CY920 module, is now available for sampling and volume production.

Source: Microchip Technology

Summit Semiconductor Extended Distance Modules Support WiSA Whole House Audio Specification

Summit Wireless, a division of Summit Semiconductor (from Portland, Oregon), supported the Wireless Speaker and Audio (WiSA) Association demonstrations at the CEDIA Expo 2014 in September. During the show, WiSA announced new multi-zone requirements and feature set for simultaneous support of both wireless home theater playback and multi-zone stereo audio streams. WiSA compliant systems should be able deliver high resolution, uncompressed audio, up to 100 m line of sight or 20 to 40 m through walls.SummitWiSAAmopReferenceDesignWeb

Summit Semiconductor confirms availability of new extended distance transmit and receive modules for those multi-zone home theater and whole home audio applications with support to the WiSA Association’s updated compliance and interoperability test specification.

WiSA members recognize the growth of whole house stereo audio solutions in the market place and the practical need to keep system cost down for mass market acceptance. With the new extended distance radio capabilities, a single system will also provide consumers with a WiSA-compliant home theater system and a whole house system.

The new Summit Semiconductor modules can transmit high quality, uncompressed audio up to 100 m line of site. When integrated in an AVR, audio hub, HDTV, Blu-ray player or gaming console, a single transmit module can manage up 32 speakers, and 8 different zones with separate volume control while simultaneously supporting both home theater and multi-zone audio transport. For example, during the CEDIA Expo the WiSA Association demonstrated a wireless 5.1 home theater system with Summit’s extended distance modules that will also simultaneously transmit a separate stereo pair with different content to a separate location.

The new extended distance modules come pre-certified by country and are backward compatible to the prior generation of Summit’s home theater wireless modules. Engineering samples for the new extended distance modules are available from Summit Semiconductor.

“We’re excited to offer the new extended distance modules in support of the WiSA Association’s multi-zone and whole house initiative,” says Tony Parker, vice president of marketing, Summit Semiconductor. “This is a perfect tool for audio products that need high resolution multi-channel audio, but want to appeal to a broader base as a multi-media whole house platform. Products such as a HDTV, AVR/Pre-amp, game console, soundbar and HTiB can benefit significantly from adding these modules to their designs.”

Source: Summit Semiconductor

PIC32MX1/2/5 Microcontrollers for Embedded Control & More

Microchip Technology’s new PIC32MX1/2/5 series enables a wide variety of applications, ranging from digital audio to general-purpose embedded control. The microcontroller series offers a robust peripheral set for a wide range of cost-sensitive applications that require complex code and higher feature integration.MicrochipPIC32MX125-starterkit

The microcontrollers feature:

  • Up to 83 DMIPS performance
  • Scalable memory options from 64/8-KB to 512/64-KB flash memory/RAM
  • Integrated CAN2.0B controllers with DeviceNet addressing support and programmable bit rates up to 1 Mbps, along with system RAM for storing up to 1024 messages in 32 buffers.
  •  Four SPI/I2S interfaces
  • A Parallel Master Port (PMP) and capacitive touch sensing hardware
  • A 10-bit, 1-Msps, 48-channel ADC
  • Full-speed USB 2.0 Device/Host/OTG peripheral
  • Four general-purpose direct memory access controllers (DMAs) and two dedicated DMAs on each CAN and USB module

 

Microchip’s MPLAB Harmony software development framework supports the MCUs. You can take advantage of Microchip’s software packages, such as Bluetooth audio development suites, Bluetooth Serial Port Profile library, audio equalizer filter libraries, various Decoders (including AAC, MP3, WMA and SBC), sample-rate conversion libraries, CAN2.0B PLIBs, USB stacks, and graphics libraries.

Microchip’s free MPLAB X IDE, the MPLAB XC32 compiler for PIC32, the MPLAB ICD3 in-circuit debugger, and the MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulation system also support the series.

The PIC32MX1/2/5 Starter Kit costs $69. The new PIC32MX1/2/5 microcontrollers with the 40-MHz/66 DMIPS speed option are available in 64-pin TQFP and QFN packages and 100-pin TQFP packages. The 50-MHz/83 DMIPS speed option for this PIC32MX1/2/5 series is expected to be available starting in late January 2015. Pricing starts at $2.75 each, in 10,000-unit quantities.

 

Source: Microchip Technology

Twin-T Oscillator Configuration

Since retiring in 2013, electrical engineer Larry Cicchinelli has provided technical support at an educational radio station. For audio circuit debugging and testing, he uses a DIY battery-powered oscillator/volume unit (VU) meter. Details follow.

Originally, I was only going to build the audio source. When I thought about how I would use the unit, it occurred to me that the device should have a display. I decided to design and build an easy-to-use unit that would combine a calibrated audio source with a level display. Then, I would have a single, battery-powered instrument to do some significant audio circuit testing and debugging.

The front panel of the oscillator/volume unit (VU) meter contains all the necessary controls. (Source: L. Cicchinelli)

The front panel of the oscillator/volume unit (VU) meter contains all the necessary controls. (Source: L. Cicchinelli)

Cicchinelli describes the Twin-T Oscillator:

The oscillator uses the well-known Twin-T configuration with a minor modification to ensure a constant level over a range of power supply voltages. The circuit I implemented maintains its output level over a range of at least 6 to 15 V. Below 6 V, the output begins to distort if you have full output voltage (0 dBu). The modification consists of two antiparallel diodes in the feedback loop. The idea came from a project on DiscoverCircuits.com. The project designer also indicates that the diodes reduce distortion.

Figure 1 shows the oscillator’s schematic. Header H1 and diode D1 enable you to have two power sources. I installed a 9-V battery and snap connector in the enclosure as well as a connector for external power. The diode enables the external source to power the unit if its voltage is greater than the battery. Otherwise the battery will power the unit. The oscillator draws about 4 mA so it does not create a large battery drain.

The standard professional line level is 4 dBu, which is 1.228 VRMS or 3.473 VPP into a 600-Ω load. The circuit values enable you to use R18 to calibrate it, so the maximum output can be set to the 4-dBu level. A 7.7 (3.473/0.45) gain is required to provide 4 dBu at the transformer. Using the resistors shown in Figure 1, R18 varies the gain of U1.2 from about 4.3 to 13.

The Twin-T oscillator’s circuitry

Figure 1: The Twin-T oscillator’s circuitry

You may need to use different resistor values for R18, R19, and R20 to achieve a different maximum level. If you prefer to use 0 dBm (0.775 VRMS into 600 Ω) instead of 4 dBu, you should change R20 to about 5 kΩ to give R18 a range more closely centered on a 4.87 (2.19/0.45) gain. The R20’s value shown in Figure 1 will probably work, but the required gain is too close to the minimum necessary for comfort. Most schematics for a Twin-T oscillator will show the combination of R3 and R4 as a single resistor of value Rx/2. They will also show the combination of C1 and C2 as a single capacitor of value Cx × 2. These values lead to the following formula:

CicchinelliEQ1

As you can see in the nearby photo, the Twin-T Oscillator and VU meter contain separate circuit boards.

The Twin-T oscillator and dual VU meter have separate circuit boards

The Twin-T oscillator and dual VU meter have separate circuit boards

This article first appeared in audioXpress January 2014. audioXpress is one of Circuit Cellar‘s sister publications.

 

Arduino-Based Tube Stereo Preamp Project

If you happen to be electrical engineer as well as an audiophile, you’re in luck. With an Arduino, some typical components, and a little knowhow, you can build DIY tube stereo preamplifier design.

Shannon Parks—owner of Mahomet, IL-based Parks Audio—designed his “Budgie” preamp after reading an article about Arduino while he was thinking about refurbishing a classic Dynaco PAS-3.

Budgie preamp (Source: S. Parks)

Budgie preamp (Source: S. Parks)

In a recent audioXpress article about the project, Parks noted:

Over the last 10 years, I have built many tube power amplifiers but I had never built a tube preamplifier. The source switching seemed particularly daunting. A friend recommended that I refurbish a classic Dynaco PAS-3 which has been a popular choice with many upgrade kit suppliers. Unfortunately, the main part of these older designs is a clumsy rotary selector switch, not to mention the noisy potentiometers and slide switches. In the 1980s, commercial stereo preamplifiers started using IC microcontrollers that permitted cleaner designs with push-button control, relays for signal switching, and a wireless remote. While reading an article about the Arduino last year, I realized these modern features could easily be incorporated into a DIY preamplifier design.

All the circuits are on one custom PCB along with the power supply and microcontroller (Source: S. Parks)

All the circuits are on one custom PCB along with the power supply and microcontroller (Source: S. Parks)

Parks said the Arduino made sense for a few key reasons:

I found these features were incredibly useful:

  • A bank of relays could switch between the four stereo inputs as well as control mute, standby, gain, and bass boost settings.
  • A red power LED could use PWM to indicate if the preamplifier is muted or in standby.
  • An IR receiver with a remote could control a motor-driven volume potentiometer, change the source input selection, and turn the unit on/off. Any IR remote could be used with a code learning mode.
  • A backlit display could easily show all the settings at a glance.
  • Momentary push buttons could select the input device, bass boost, gain, and mute settings.
  • Instead of using several Arduino shields wired to an Arduino board, all the circuits could fit on one custom PCB along with the power supply and the microcontroller.

Parks used an Arduino Nano, which 0.73” × 1.70”. “The tiny Nano can be embedded using a 32-pin dual in-line package (DIP) socket, which cleans up the design. It can be programmed in-circuit and be removed and easily replaced,” he noted.

Parks used an Arduino Nano for the preamp project (Source: S. Parks)

Parks used an Arduino Nano for the preamp project (Source: S. Parks)

Parks described the shift register circuit:

The Budgie preamplifier uses a serial-in, parallel-out (SIPO) shift register to drive a bank of relays ….

A SIPO shift register is used to drive a bank of relays (Source: S. Parks)

A SIPO shift register is used to drive a bank of relays (Source: S. Parks)

Only four Arduino digital outputs—enable, clock, latch, and data—are needed to control eight DPDT relays. These correspond to the four outputs labeled D3, D4, D5, and D7 s …. The Texas Instruments TPIC6C595 shift register used in this project has heavy-duty field-effect transistor (FET) outputs that can handle voltages higher than logic levels. This is necessary for operating the 24-V relays. It also acts as a protective buffer between the Arduino and the relays.

Here you see the how to set up the Arduino Nano, LCD, power supply, push button , IR and motor control circuits (Source: S. Parks)

Here you see the how to set up the Arduino Nano, LCD, power supply, push button , IR and motor control circuits (Source: S. Parks)

As for the audio circuit, Parks explained:

The 12B4 triode was originally designed to be used in televisions as a vertical deflection amplifier. New-old-stock (NOS) 12B4s still exist. They can be purchased from most US tube resellers. However, a European equivalent doesn’t exist. The 12B4 works well in preamplifiers as a one-tube solution, having both high input impedance and low output impedance, without need for an output transformer. An audio circuit can then be distilled down to a simple circuit with few parts consisting of a volume potentiometer and a grounded cathode gain stage.
The 12B4 has about 23-dB gain, which is more than is needed. This extra gain is used as feedback to the grid, in what is often referred to as an anode follower circuit. The noise, distortion, and output impedance are reduced (see Figure 3). Using relays controlled by the Arduino enables switching between two feedback amounts for adjustable gain. For this preamplifier, I chose 0- and 6-dB overall gain. A second relay enables a bass boost with a series capacitor.
You only need a lightweight 15-to-20-V plate voltage to operate the 12B4s at 5 mA. Linearity is very good due to the small signal levels involved, as rarely will the output be greater than 2 VPP. A constant current source (CCS) active load is used with the 12B4s instead of a traditional plate resistor. This maximizes the possible output voltage swing before clipping. For example, a 12B4 biased at 5-mA plate current with a 20-kΩ plate resistor would drop 100 V and would then require a 120-V supply voltage or higher. Conversely, the CCS will only drop about 2 V. Its naturally high impedance also improves the tube’s gain and linearity while providing high levels of power supply noise rejection.

This article first appeared in Circuit Cellar’s sister publication, audioXpress (July 2014).