CC 25th Anniversary Issue: The Past, Present, and Future of Embedded Design

In celebration of Circuit Cellar’s 25th year of publishing electrical engineering articles, we’ll release a special edition magazine around the start of 2013. The issue’s theme will be the past, present, and future of embedded electronics. World-renowned engineers, innovators, academics, and corporate leaders will provide essays, interviews, and projects on embedded design-related topics such as mixed-signal designs, the future of 8-bit chips, rapid prototyping, FPGAs, graphical user interfaces, embedded security, and much more.

Here are some of the essay topics that will appear in the issue:

  • The history of Circuit Cellar — Steve Ciarcia (Founder, Circuit Cellar, Engineer)
  • Do small-RAM devices have a future? — by John Regehr (Professor, University of Utah)
  • A review of embedded security risks — by Patrick Schaumont (Professor, Virginia Tech)
  • The DIY electronics revolution — by Limor Fried (Founder, Adafruit Industries)
  • The future of rapid prototyping — by Simon Ford (ARM mbed, Engineer)
  • Robust design — by George Novacek (Engineer, Retired Aerospace Executive)
  • Twenty-five essential embedded system design principles — by Bob Japenga (Embedded Systems Engineer, Co-Founder, Microtools Inc.)
  • Mixed-signal designs: the 25 errors you’ll make at least once — by Robert Lacoste (Founder, Alciom; Engineer)
  • User interface tips for embedded designers — by Curt Twillinger (Engineer)
  • Thinking in terms of hardware platforms, not chips — by Clemens Valens (Engineer, Elektor)
  • The future of FPGAs — by Colin O’Flynn (Engineer)
  • The future of e-learning for engineers and programmers — by Marty Hauff (e-Learning Specialist, Altium)
  • And more!

Interviews

We’ll feature interviews with embedded industry leaders and forward-thinking embedded design engineers and programmers such as:

More Content

In addition to the essays and interviews listed above, the issue will also include:

  • PROJECTS will be available via QR codes
  • INFOGRAPHICS depicting tech-related likes, dislikes, and ideas of hundreds of engineers.
  • And a few surprises!

Who Gets It?

All Circuit Cellar subscribers will receive the 25th Anniversary issue. Additionally, the magazine will be available online and promoted by Circuit Cellar’s parent company, Elektor International Media.

Get Involved

Want to get involved? Sponsorship and advertising opportunities are still available. Find out more by contacting Peter Wostrel at Strategic Media Marketing at 978-281-7708 (ext. 100) or peter@smmarketing.us. Inquire about editorial opportunities by contacting the editorial department.

About Circuit Cellar

Steve Ciarcia launched Circuit Cellar magazine in 1988. From its beginning as “Ciarcia’s Circuit Cellar,” a popular, long-running column in BYTE magazine, Ciarcia leveraged his engineering knowledge and passion for writing about it by launching his own publication. Since then, tens of thousands of readers around the world have come to regard Circuit Cellar as the #1 source for need-to-know information about embedded electronics, design, and programming.

DIY 10.1˝ Touchscreen Home Control System

Domotics (home automation) control systems are among the most innovative and rewarding design projects creative electrical engineers can undertake. Let’s take a look at an innovative Beagle Board-based control system that enables a user to control lights with a 10.1˝ capacitive touchscreen.

Domotics control system

The design features the following modules:

• An I/O board for testing purposes
• An LED strip board for controlling an RGB LED strip
• A relay board for switching 230-VAC devices
• An energy meter for measuring on/off (and also for logging)

ELektor editor and engineer Clemens Valens recently interviewed Koen van Dongen about the design. Van Dongen describes the system’s electronics and then demonstrates how to use the touchscreen to control a light and LED strip.

As Valens explains suggests, it would be a worthwhile endeavor to incorporate a Wi-Fi connection to enable cellphone and tablet control. If you build such system, be sure to share it with our staff. Good luck!

CircuitCellar.com is an Elektor International Media website.

Raspberry Pi Now Shipping

Got Raspberry Pi? Probably not. But rest assured. The wait is almost over.

After receiving an inquiry about the status of Raspberry Pi from a Circuit Cellar member earlier today, I decided to do a bit of research. It didn’t take long to figure out that hundreds of thousands of orders have been placed and shipping has begun.

Raspberry Pi (Source: Raspberry Pi Foundation & posted on Elektor.com)

TheInquirer.net reported last week that more than 350,000 orders have been placed since February and the next shipments are scheduled for May.

According to an April 18 post by element14′s Sagar Jethani, shipping is underway and “will be made strictly in the order that commitments were received within each region — Europe, Asia, and the Americas.” He added that “Everyone who ordered before 18th April will definitely receive their Raspberry Pi before the end of June. Those placing new orders from today can expect a July delivery.”

I encourage Circuit Cellar members to tell us what they think about Raspberry Pi once their receive their orders. We’ll be happy to review project articles for publication in print or online.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s compact (85.60 mm × 53.98 mm × 17 mm) single-bard computer features a Broadcom BCM2835, an ARM1176JZFS, and a Videocore 4 GPU. The ARM GNU/Linux system costs $25.

You can order the Raspberry Pi from element14 and RS Components.

Check out my first Raspberry Pi post for additional information.

Tech Highlights from Design West: RL78, AndroPod, Stellaris, mbed, & more

The Embedded Systems Conference has always been a top venue for studying, discussing, and handling the embedded industry’s newest leading-edge technologies. This year in San Jose, CA, I walked the floor looking for the tech Circuit Cellar and Elektor members would love to get their hands on and implement in novel projects. Here I review some of the hundreds of interesting products and systems at Design West 2012.

RENESAS

Renesas launched the RL78 Design Challenge at Design West. The following novel RL78 applications were particularly intriguing.

  • An RL78 L12 MCU powered by a lemon:

    A lemon powers the RL78 (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

  • An RL78 kit used for motor control:

    The RL78 used for motor control (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

  • An RL78 demo for home control applications:

    The RL78 used for home control (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

Circuit Cellar members have used TI products in countless applications. Below are two interesting TI Cortex-based designs

A Cortex-M3 digital guitar (you can see the Android connection):

TI's digital guitar (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

Stellaris fans will be happy to see the Stellaris ARM Cortex -M4F in a small wireless application:

The Stellaris goes wireless (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

NXP mbed

Due to the success of the recent NXP mbed Design Challenge, I stopped at the mbed station to see what exciting technologies our NXP friends were exhibiting. They didn’t disappoint. Check out the mbed-based slingshot developed for playing Angry Birds!

mbed-Based sligshot for going after "Angry Birds" (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

Below is a video of the project on the mbedmicro YouTube page:

FTDI

I was pleased to see the Elektor AndroPod hard at work at the FTDI booth. The design enables users to easily control a robotic arm with Android smartphones and tablets.

FTDI demonstrates robot control with Android (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

As you can imagine, the possible applications are endless.

The AndroPod at work! (Photo: Circuit Cellar)

Radiant Floor Heating Zone Controller Project

Even if you aren’t interested in designing a radiant floor zoned heating system, you can study this innovative project and apply what you learn to any number of building control and automation applications. Dalibor Zaric’s Radiant Floor Heating Zone Controller is built around an NXP Semiconductors LPC2134 ARM processor that’s connected to an Echelon Pyxos chip. The project won Second Place in Echelon’s 2007 “Control Without Limits” design competition.

The heat zone controller system (Source: Echelon & Dalibor Zaric)

Zaric provides the following details in his project documentation:

“• Power supply to unit is 24VAC and controller has switching power supply to provide 24VDC for Pyxos network as well 5V for logic, there is 3.3V linear regulator as well.

• There are four relay with 24VAC output to power up thermoelectric zone valve on radiant floor heating manifold. These outputs are protected with 1.85A self resetting fuse to prevent overloading. This block has as well 24VAC/DC dry contact to provide a call for heat to boiler or optional zones pump.

• Pyxos power supply filter and Pyxos chip provides Pyxos network connection for future sensors and thermostats. Pyxos thermostat will be more cost effective than regular LONWorks sensors/thermostats.

• RS-485 driver will provide future Modbus connection for local touch screens or smart home systems with Modbus connections. There is end of line resistors enabled with the dip switches beside connector.

• 3150 Neuron board with 64K flash provides LONWorks connection to the controller.”

 

The heat zone controller diagram (Source: Echelon & Dalibor Zaric)

For more information about Pyxos technology, visit www.echelon.com.

This winning project, as well as others, was promoted by Circuit Cellar based on a 2007 agreement with Echelon.