Cypress Semi Teams with Arm for Secure IoT MCU Solution

Cypress Semiconductor has expanded its collaboration with Arm to provide management of IoT edge nodes. The solution integrates the Arm Pelion IoT Platform with Cypress’ low power, dual-core PSoC 6 microcontrollers (MCUs) and CYW4343W Wi-Fi and Bluetooth combo radios. PSoC 6 provides Arm v7-M hardware-based security that adheres to the highest level of device protection defined by the Arm Platform Security Architecture (PSA).
Cypress and Arm demonstrated hardware-secured onboarding and communication through the integration of the dual-core PSoC 6 MCU and Pelion IoT Platform in the Arm booth at Arm TechCon last month. In the demo, the PSoC 6 was running Arm’s PSA-defined Secure Partition Manager to be supported in Arm Mbed OS version 5.11 open-source embedded operating system, which will be available this December. Embedded systems developers can leverage the private key storage and hardware-accelerated cryptography in the PSoC 6 MCU for cryptographically-secured lifecycle management functions, such as over-the-air firmware updates, mutual authentication and device attestation and revocation. According to the company, Cypress is making a strategic push to integrate security into its compute, connect and store portfolio for the IoT.

The PSoC 6 architecture is built on ultra-low-power 40-nm process technology, and the MCUs feature low-power design techniques to extend battery life up to a full week for wearables. The dual-core Arm Cortex-M4 and Cortex-M0+ architecture lets designers optimize for power and performance simultaneously. Using its dual cores combined with configurable memory and peripheral protection units, the PSoC 6 MCU delivers the highest level of protection defined by the Platform Security Architecture (PSA) from Arm.

Designers can use the MCU’s software-defined peripherals to create custom analog front-ends (AFEs) or digital interfaces for innovative system components such as electronic-ink displays. The PSoC 6 MCU features the latest generation of Cypress’ industry-leading CapSense capacitive-sensing technology, enabling modern touch and gesture-based interfaces that are robust and reliable.

Cypress Semiconductor | www.cypress.com

Tiny, Single-GbE Arm Networking SBC Runs Linux

Gateworks has spun a 100 mm x 35 mm, single-GbE “Newport GW6100” networking SBC, which follows a recent dual-GbE “GW6200” model. Both run Linux on a dual-core Cavium Octeon TX SoC and offer mini-PCIe expansion and -40 to 85°C support.

In Nov. 2017, when Gateworks unveiled its Newport family of Linux-driven, Octeon TX based SBCs with the 105 mm x 100 mm, dual GbE port Newport GW6300, it promised several more models in 2018. The 140 mm x 100 mm, 5-GbE port Newport GW6400 was announced in May along with a GW6404 sibling that swaps two of the GbE ports to SFP ports. Now, the company has launched the single-GbE port GW6100 model, which had been scheduled for a 2018 Q2 arrival. There was no announcement of the GW6100, which was discovered by CNXSoft, nor of the dual-port, 100 mm x 75 mm GW6200, which now has a product page (see farther below).

 
Newport GW6100 (left) and recent Newport GW6200
(click images to enlarge)
Like the other Newport SBCs, the new entries run OpenWrt or Ubuntu on Cavium’s networking focused Octeon TX SoC, which has Cortex-A53 like ”Thunder” cores. The embedded-oriented Octeon TX competes directly with NXP’s QorIQ line. Optimized to run multiple concurrent data and control planes simultaneously, the headless SoC integrates security architecture from Cavium’s Nitrox V security processors.

While the Newport GW6300 and GW6400 both offer a choice of dual- (800MHz) or quad-core (1.5GHz) Octeon TX configurations, the GW6100 and GW6200 are limited to the 800MHz dual-core models. Volume orders are required to switch to the quad-core SoC or make other customizations, including boosting the standard 1GB DDR4 to up to 4GB or the standard 8GB eMMC to up to 64GB.

The Newport GW6100 and GW6200 provide OpenWrt or Ubuntu Linux BSPs with U-Boot. A full development kit is available with a power supply, passive PoE injector, JTAG programmer, and cables.

Newport GW6100

The tiny new GW6100 offers 1GB DDR4, 8GB eMMC, and a GbE port with PoE support. You can also draw power from the USB Type-C port, and there’s a JTAG connection and an I/O connector. The latter offers serial, analog, and digital I/O, as well as I2C, SPI, and power.


Newport GW6100 front detail view
(click image to enlarge)
A single mini-PCIe slot accompanied by a nano-SIM slot supports third-party PCIe, USB 3.0, and mSATA cards. You can also choose from several Gateworks mini-PCIe options, including USB, DIO/analog I/O, microSD/USB/SIM, Femto, and IoT Radio (Sub-1GHz) modules.


GW6100 rear detail view
(click image to enlarge)
Like all the Newport SBCs, the GW6100 provides standard -40 to 85°C support. There’s an 8-60V DC jack in addition to the PoE, Type-C, and power header options. Other features include reverse power protection, programmable wake-up/shutdown, a watchdog, real-time clock, and more. A Ublox GNSS receiver is optional.


GW6100 block diagram
(click image to enlarge)

Specifications listed for the Newport GW6100 include:

  • Processor — Cavium Octeon TX (2x ARMv8 ThunderX cores @ 800MHz); networking and security extensions
  • Memory/storage:
    • 1GB DDR4
    • 8GB eMMC
    • mSATA (SATA III) via mini-PCIe
  • Networking — Gigabit Ethernet port with passive PoE 8-60V input
  • Other I/O:
    • USB 2.0 Type-C port with 1.5A, 7.5W power support
    • Application connector (serial I/O, digital I/O, analog, I2C, SPI, and power)
    • JTAG interface
  • Expansion — Mini-PCIe slot with 8W power for “PCIe, USB 3.0 or mSATA with USB 2.0”; Nano-SIM slot
  • Other features – Watchdog; RTC with battery; LED, tamper switch support; voltage and temp. monitor; serial config EEPROM; programmable fan controller with tach support; Optional Ublox ZOE-MQ8 GNSS GPS Receiver with PPS
  • Operating temperature — -40 to 85°C
  • Power:
    • 8-60V DC jack (or PoE or Type-C)
    • 0.13A @ 24VDC typical operating current
    • Voltage reverse protection
    • Programmable shut-down and wake-up
  • Dimensions — 100 x 35 x 21mm
  • Weight — 85 g
  • Operating system — OpenWrt or Ubuntu BSPs

Newport GW6200

The 100 x 75mm Newport GW6200 adds to the GW6100 feature set with a microSD slot, a second GbE port (both with PoE), plus a second mini-PCIe slot. In place of the Type-C port you get 2x USB 3.0 ports.

 
Newport GW6200 detail view (left) and block diagram
(click images to enlarge)
The CW6200 is further equipped with side-mounted connectors for SPI, DIO, I2C, and either 2x RS232 or a single RS232/422/485 interface. A CAN bus controller is optional.

Further information

The Newport GW6100 and Newport GW6200 appear to be available now at undisclosed prices. More information may be found on Gateworks’ Newport GW6100and Newport GW6200 product pages.

Gateworks | www.gateworks.com

MCU Family Serves Up Ultra-Low Power Functionality

STMicroelectronics has released its STM32L0x0 Value Line microcontrollers that provide an additional, low-cost entry point to the STM32L0 series The MCUs embed the Arm Cortex -M0+ core. With up to 128 KB flash memory, 20 KB SRAM and 512 byte true embedded EEPROM on-chip the MCUs save external components to cut down on board space and BOM cost. In addition to price-sensitive and space-constrained consumer devices such as fitness trackers, computer or gaming accessories and remotes, the new STM32L0x0 Value Line MCUs are well suited for personal medical devices, industrial sensors, and IoT devices such as building controls, weather stations, smart locks, smoke detectors or fire alarms.
The devices leverage ST’s power-saving low-leakage process technology and device features such as a low-power UART, low-power timer, 41µA 10 ksample/s ADC and wake-up from power saving in as little as 5µs. Designers can use these devices to achieve goals such as extending battery runtime without sacrificing product features, increasing wireless mobility, or endowing devices like smart meters or IoT sensors with up to 10-year battery-life leveraging the ultra-frugal 670 nA power-down current with RTC and RAM retention.

The Keil MDK-ARM professional IDE supports STM32L0x0 devices free of charge, and the STM32CubeMX configuration-code generator provides easy-to-use design analysis including a power-consumption calculator. A compatible Nucleo-64 development board (NUCLEO-L010RB) with Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) library is already available, to facilitate fast project startup.

The STM32L0x0 Value Line comprises six new parts, giving a choice of 16- KB, 64- KB, or 128- KB of flash memory, 128-byte, 256-byte or 512-byte EEPROM, and various package options. In addition, pin-compatibility with the full STM32 family of more than 800 part numbers offering a wide variety of core performance and integrated features, allows design flexibility and future scalability, with the freedom to leverage existing investment in code, documentation and tools.

STM32L0x0 Value Line microcontrollers are in production now, priced from $0.44 with 16-KB of flash memory and 128-byte EEPROM, for orders of 10,000 pieces. The unit price starting at $0.32 is available for high-volume orders.

STMicroelectronics| www.st.com

NXP i.MX RT1060 Crossover Processors Released

First announced in February at Embedded World 2018, NXP Semiconductors has released its i.MX RT1060 Crossover processor, with the company claiming a mere ten months from concept to market launch.

The i.MX RT1060 is the latest addition to what NXP calls a crossover processor series and expands the i.MX RT series to three scalable families. The i.MX RT1060 doubles the On-Chip SRAM to 1 MB while keeping pin-to-pin compatibility with i.MX RT1050. This new series introduces additional features ideal for real-time applications such as High-Speed GPIO, CAN-FD, and synchronous parallel NAND/NOR/PSRAM controller. The i.MX RT1060 runs on the Arm Cortex-M7 core at 600 MHz.

This device is fully supported by NXP’s MCUXpresso Software and Tools, a comprehensive and cohesive set of free software development tools for Kinetis, LPC and i.MX RT microcontrollers. MCUXpresso SDK also includes project files for Keil MDK and IAR EWARM.

The i.MX RT crossover are designed to bridge the gap between high-performance and integration while minimizing costs to meet today’s need for high performance embedded processing at the edge node. According to NXP the series were designed to combine high performance MCU processing with the functionality of applications processors, at reduced costs, thereby enabling advanced computation and machine learning capabilities in millions of connected edge devices. The i.MX RT1060 is available now, and is priced at $3.48 (10,000s).

NXP Semiconductors | www.nxp.com

Rugged, Sandwich-Style SBC is Based on Sitara AM5718 MCU

By Eric Brown

Forlinx Embedded Technology, the Chinese company behind Linux-friendly SBCs such as the Texas Instruments (TI) Sitara AM3354 based OK335xS-II and the Forlinx i.MX6 SBC, has posted details on a new OK5718-C SBC. Like the OK335xS-II, it’s a Sitara based board, in this case tapping TI’s single-core, Cortex-A15 based Sitara AM5718. Like the i.MX6 SBC, it’s a sandwich-style offering, with the separately available FET5718-C module hosting the up to 1.5GHz AM5718.


OK5718-C
The OK5718-C was announced (translated) in China back in May, and the product page was recently spotted by CNXSoft. The FET5718-C module and OK5718-C SBC both support -40 to 85℃ temperatures and feature an optimized Linux distro with Linux 4.9.41, Qt 5.6, and Wayland. The BSP includes PCIe host and slave mode optimizations, a simplified file system for faster boot and flashing, and an image system to allow Weston virtual keyboards and easy Qt image stacking, says Forlinx.

FET5718-C module

The FET5718-C module’s Sitara AM5718 SoC may have a somewhat old-school CPU, but it provides plenty of extras. You get both a PowerVR SGX544 3D GPU and Vivante GC320 2D GPU, as well as a 750MHz TI DSP-C66X digital signal processor and video accelerator. There’s also the same, 200MHz programmable PRU subsystem found on the BeagleBone, as well as dual, 213MHz Cortex-M4 microcontrollers.



FET5718-C 

The combination of the DSP with the real-time MCUs enables robotics, machine vision, medical imaging, automotive, and facial recognition applications. Industrial automation and building automation applications are also supported.

The FET5718-C module adds 1GB DDR3L, 8GB eMMC, a TPS659162RGZR power management unit, and a 3-port Gigabit Ethernet switch subsystem. The 12-layer, 70 x 50mm COM runs on 5V power and has a 320-pin board-to-board connector.

OK5718-C board

The 4-layer, 190 x 130mm OK5718-C baseboard expands upon the FET5718-C features with ports popping out on all sides. The board provides 2x GbE ports, onboard WiFi and Bluetooth, and a mini-PCIe slot with optional 3G/4G. There are single USB 3.0 host and micro-USB 2.0 device ports and a pair of USB 2.0 host ports.

The OK5718-C is further equipped with an HDMI port, an SD slot, a CAN port, and dual audio jacks. Onboard I/O includes SATA 2.0 with power, DVP and 2x MIPI-CSI camera interfaces, and other I/O as detailed below.



OK5718-C detail view
(click image to enlarge)

Specifications listed for the OK5718-C SBC include:

  • Processor (via FET5718-C module) — TI Sitara AM5718 (1x Cortex-A15 core @ up to 1.5GHz; PowerVR SGX544 3D GPU; Vivante GC320 2D GPU; 750MHz TI DSP-C66X; IVA-HD image/video accelerator; 200MHz PRU-ICSS; 2x 213MHz Cortex-M4
  • Memory/storage:
    • 1GB DDR3L (via FET5718-C)
    • 8GB eMMC (via FET5718-C)
    • QSPI flash (via FET5718-C)
    • SD slot (SD, SDHC, SDXC support)
    • SDIO interface
    • SATA 2.0 interface with SATA power
  • Wireless — 802.11b/g/n with Bluetooth
  • Networking — 2x GbE ports
  • Media I/O:
    • HDMI 1.4a port for up to 1080P@60Hz
    • RGB 888 LCD interface
    • Dual display support
    • 2x MIPI-CSI
    • DVP 8-bit 5MP camera interface
    • Mic and headphone jacks; speaker headers
  • Other I/O:
    • USB 3.0 host port
    • 2x USB 2.0 host ports
    • Micro-USB 2.0 device port
    • 3x UART
    • 2x I2C
    • Serial debug port
    • CAN 2.0, SPI, GPMC, HDQ, JTAG
  • Expansion — Mini-PCIe slot with optional Huawei 3G/4G card
  • Other features — 2x LED; 3x user keys; RTC with coin-cell battery; boot config switch
  • Power — 12V DC input; power and reset switches
  • Operating temperature — -40 to 85°C
  • Dimensions — 190 x 130mm
  • Operating system — Custom Linux with Kernel 4.9.41, Qt 5.6, and Wayland

Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the OK5718-C SBC or FET5718-C module. More information may be found on the Forlinx OK5718-C and FET5718-C product pages. There’s also a product page at Faststream Technologies.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on August 20.

Texas Instruments | www.ti.com

Compact, Arm-based Mini-PC is Toughened up for IIoT

By Eric Brown

DFI’s Pico-ITX-based, DIN-rail mountable “EC900-FS6” mini-PC runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6 DualLite, and offers 2x GbE, 2x USB, 2x serial, mini-PCIe, and extensive ruggedization features.

A reader recently noted our excessive use of the term “rugged,” which is fair enough. In our defense, embedded gear is increasingly tolerant of wide temperature ranges, and to a lesser extent, excessive shock, vibration, and dust and water ingress. From now on, we will no longer use “rugged” to describe a system that has a wide temperature range without also offering other protections. We will, however, continue to apply it to systems like DFI’s i.MX6-based EC900-FS6 mini-PC, which is not only rugged, but quite compact at 143 mm x 96.4 mmx 34 mm.


 
EC900-FS6
(click images to enlarge)

Designed for industrial IoT (IIoT) gateways and other embedded applications, the EC900-FS6 features -20 to 60°C or -40 to 70°C support, as well as 3G, 11ms shock resistance and IEC68-2-64 (3G) compliant vibration resistance (random 5~500Hz). It also has a 10 to 90% RH (non-condensing) humidity range and provides a wide-range 9-36V DC input via a terminal block. The fanless, DIN-rail mountable system has a 15-year lifecycle guarantee.

The EC900-FS6 is built around DFI’s Pico-ITX form-factor FS053 SBC, which is equipped with a dual Cortex-A9 i.MX6 DualLite SoC clocked to 1GHz. Both the SBC and the system ship with Android 5.1 beta, as well as a stack built with Yocto Project 1.8 beta, both with Linux Kernel 3.14.52.

 
DFI FS053 (left) and detail views
(click images to enlarge)
The EC900-FS6 provides 1GB or 2GB of DDR3L, 8GB or 16GB of eMMC, 4MB NOR flash, and a microSD slot. You get dual GbE ports (Atheros AR8033-AL1B and Microchip LAN7500-ABZJ controllers), as well as dual USB 2.0 ports and internal USB 2.0 and USB OTG interfaces.


EC900-FS6 detail view
(click image to enlarge)

The EC900-FS6 is further equipped with an HD-resolution HDMI port, 4-bit DIO, a UART console, and RS-485 and RS-232 interfaces deployed via 2-pole terminal blocks. A mini-PCIe slot is accompanied by dual mounting holes for WiFi antennas. Other features include a watchdog timer, a reset button, and a status LED.

Further information

The EC900-FS6 appears to be available now at an undisclosed price. More information may be found in this EC900-FS6 announcement and datasheet (PDF).

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on August 29.

DFI | www.dfi.com

MCUs and Processors Vie for Embedded Mindshare

Performance Push

Today’s crop of high-performance microcontrollers and embedded processors provide a rich continuum of features, functions and capabilities. Embedded system designers have many choices in both categories but the dividing line between the two can be blurry.

By Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

At one time the world of microcontrollers and the world of microprocessors were clearly separate. That’s slowly changed over the years as the high-performance segment of microcontrollers have become more powerful. And the same time, embedded processors have captured ever more mindshare and market share that used to be exclusively owned by the MCU camp. The lines blurred even further once most all MCUs started using Arm-based processor cores.

All the leading MCU vendors have a high-performance line of products, some in the 200 MHz and up range. Moreover, some application-specific MCU offerings are designed specifically for the performance needs of a particular market segment—automotive being the prime example. In some cases, these high end MCUs are vying for design wins against embedded processors that meet the same size, weight and power requirements as MCUs. In this article, we’ll examine some of the latest and greatest products and technologies on both sides.

High Performance MCU

An example of an MCU vendor’s high-performance line of products is Cypress Semiconductor’s FM4. FM4 is a portfolio of 32-bit, general-purpose, high performance MCUs based on the Arm Cortex-M4 processor with FPU and DSP functionality. FM4 microcontrollers operate at frequencies up to 200 MHz and support a diverse set of on-chip peripherals for motor control, factory automation and home appliance applications. The portfolio delivers low-latency, reliable, machine-to-machine (M2M) communication required for Industry 4.0 using network-computing technologies to advance design and manufacturing.

The FM4 MCU supports an operating voltage range of 2.7 V to 5.5 V. The devices incorporate 256 KB to 2 MB flash and up to 256 KB RAM. The fast flash memory combined with a flash accelerator circuit (pre-fetch buffer plus instruction cache) provides zero-wait-state operation up to 200 MHz. A standard DMA and an additional descriptor-based DMA (DSTC), each with an independent bus for data transfer, can be used to further offload the CPU. Figure 1 shows the FM4-216-ETHERNET, a development platform for developing applications using the Arm Cortex-M4-based FM4 S6E2CC MCU.

Figure 1
The FM4-216-ETHERNET is a development platform for developing applications using the Arm Cortex-M4-based FM4 S6E2CC MCU.

The high-performance line of MCUs from ST Microelectronics is its STM32H7 series. An example product from that series is the STM32H753 MCU with Arm’s highest-performing embedded core (Cortex-M7). According to ST Micro it delivers a record performance of 2020 CoreMark/856 DMIPS running at 400 MHz, executing code from embedded flash memory.

Other innovations and features implemented by ST further boost performance.These include the Chrom-ART Accelerator for fast and efficient graphical user-interfaces, a hardware JPEG codec that allows high-speed image manipulation, highly efficient Direct Memory Access (DMA) controllers, up to 2 MB of on-chip dual-bank flash memory with read-while-write capability, and the L1 cache allowing full-speed interaction with off-chip memory. Multiple power domains allow developers to minimize the energy consumed by their applications, while plentiful I/Os, communication interfaces, and audio and analog peripherals can address a wide range of entertainment, remote-monitoring and control applications.

Last year STMicro announced its STM32H7 high-performing MCUs are designed with the same security concepts as the Platform Security Architecture (PSA) from Arm announced at that time. This PSA framework on the STM32H7 MCUs are combined with STM32-family enhanced security features and services. ST’s STM32H7 MCU devices integrate hardware-based security features including a True Random-Number Generator (TRNG) and advanced cryptographic processor, which will simplify protecting embedded applications and global IoT systems against attacks like eavesdropping, spoofing or man-in-the-middle interception.

MCU Runs Linux OS

One dividing line that remains between MCUs and microprocessors is their ability to run major operating systems. While most embedded processors can run OSes like Linux, most MCUs lack the memory architecture required to do so. Breaking that barrier, in February MCU vendor Microchip Technology unveiled a System on Module (SOM) featuring the SAMA5D2 microprocessor. The ATSAMA5D27-SOM1 contains the recently released ATSAMA5D27C-D1G-CU System in Package (SiP) (Figure 2).

Figure 2
The Arm Cortex-A5-based SAMA5D2 SiP is available in three DDR2 memory sizes (128 Mb, 512 Mb and 1 Gb) and optimized for bare metal, RTOS and Linux implementation

The SOM simplifies design by integrating the power management, non-volatile boot memory, Ethernet PHY and high-speed DDR2 memory onto a small, single-sided PCB. There is a great deal of design effort and complexity associated with creating an industrial-grade MPU-based system running a Linux operating system. The SOM integrates multiple external components and eliminates key design challenges around EMI, ESD and signal integrity. …

Read the full article in the August 337 issue of Circuit Cellar

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NXP i.MX6-Based Boards Boast Extended Temp Operation

Versalogic has announced the Zebra, its latest in their new line of production-ready ARM-based embedded computers. Featuring models with either the NXP i.MX6 Solo (single core), or the i.MX6 DualLite (dual core) processors, the Zebra is rated for full industrial temperature operation (-40°C to +85°C). The compact 95 mm x 95 mm computer board typically consumes less than 3 W of power when operating.

Unlike many ARM-based “modules,” Versalogic’s new ARM-based products are complete board-level computers. They do not require additional carrier cards, companion boards, connector break-out boards or other add-ons to function. For ease of mounting and future upgrades, the Zebra product conforms to the size and mounting points of the industry standard COM Compact format. Unlike proprietary-format ARM products, Versalogic ARM boards provide a standardized mounting pattern for simplified upgrading in the future.
The Zebra embedded computer board is ready for off-the-shelf deployment into demanding industrial, defense and aerospace applications requiring rugged, long-life, power efficient, industrial temperature rated (-40°C to +85°C) solutions.

Both Zebra models include soldered-on memory, and a variety of I/O. The on-board I/O includes a Gigabit Ethernet port with network boot capability, two USB 2.0 Ports, serial I/O (RS-232), CAN Bus, I2C, and SPI. An on-board 6-axis e-compass is optional.

Many applications that require lower power or lower heat dissipation still need very high levels of reliability. Designed and tested for industrial temperature (-40° to +85°C) operation, VersaLogic’s Zebra also meets MIL-STD-202G specifications to withstand high impact and vibration.

ARM-based Zebra products, part numbers VL-EPC-2701, are in stock at both Versalogic and Digi-Key. with OEM pricing starting at $168.

Versalogic | www.versalogic.com

Linux-Driven Modules and SBC Tap i.MX8, i.MX8M and iMX8X

By Eric Brown

Phytec has posted product pages for three PhyCore modules, all of which support Linux and offer a -40°C to 85°C temperature range. The three modules, which employ three different flavors of i.MX8, include a phyCORE-i.MX 8X COM, which is the first product we’ve seen that uses the dual- or quad-core Cortex-A35 i.MX8X.

phyCORE-i.MX 8X (top) and phyCORE-i.MX 8M (bottom – not to scale) (click images to enlarge)

The phyCORE-i.MX 8 taps the high-end, hexa-core -A72 and -A53 i.MX8, including the i.MX8 QuadMax. The phyCORE-i.MX 8M, which uses the more widely deployed dual- or quad-core i.MX8M, is the only module that appears as part of an announced SBC: the sandwich-style phyBoard-Polaris SBC (shown). The phyCORE-i.MX 8 will also eventually appear on an unnamed, crowd-sourced Pico-ITX SBC.

phyCORE-i.MX 8 (left) and NXP i.MX8 block diagram (bottom)
(click images to enlarge)

Development-only carrier boards will be available for the phyCORE-i.MX 8X and phyCORE-i.MX 8. Evaluation kits based on the carrier boards and the phyBoard-Polaris will include BSPs with a Yocto Project based Linux distribution “with pre-installed and configured packages such as QT-Libs, OpenGL and Python.” Android is also available, and QNX, FreeRTOS and other OSes are available on request. BSP documentation will include a hardware manual, quickstart instructions, application guides, and software and application examples.

 

i.MX8M, i.MX8X, and i.MX8 compared (click image to enlarge)

The three modules are here presented in order of ascending processing power.

phyCore-i.MX 8X

The i.MX8X SoC found on the petite phyCORE-i.MX 8X module was announced with other i.MX8 processors in Oct. 2016 and was more fully revealed in Mar. 2017. The industrial IoT focused i.MX8X includes up to 4x cores that comply with Arm’s rarely used Cortex-A35 successor to the Cortex-A7 design.

phyCore-i.MX 8X (top) and block diagram (bottom)
(click images to enlarge)

The 28 nm fabricated, ARMv8 Cortex-A35 cores are claimed to draw about 33 percent less power per core and occupy 25 percent less silicon area than Cortex-A53. Phytec’s comparison chart shows the i.MX8X with 5,040 to 10,800 DMIPS performance, which is surprisingly similar to the 3,450 to 13,800 range provided by the Cortex-A53 based i.MX8M (see above).The i.MX8X SoC is further equipped with a single Cortex-M4 microcontroller, a Tensilica HiFi 4 DSP, and a multi-format VPU that supports up to 4K playback and HD encode. It uses the same Vivante GC7000Lite GPU found on the i.MX8M, with up to 28 GFLOPS.

i.MX8X block diagram
(click image to enlarge)

The i.MX8X features ECC memory support, reduced soft-error-rate (SER) technology, hardware virtualization, and other industrial and automotive safety related features. Crypto features listed for the phyCore-i.MX 8X COM include AES, 3DES, RSA, ECC Ciphers, SHA1/256, and TRNG.

PhyCore-i.MX7

Phytec’s 52 mm x 42 mm phyCore-i.MX 8X is only slightly larger than the i.MX7-based PhyCore-i.MX7, but the layout is different. The module supports all three i.MX8X models: the quad-core i.MX8 QuadXPlus and the dual-core i.MX8 DualXPlus and i.MX8 DualX, all of which can clock up to 1.2 GHz. The DualX model differs in that it has a 2-shader instead of 4-shader Vivante GPU.

The phyCore-i.MX 8X offers a smorgasbord of memories. In addition to the “128 kB multimedia,” and “64 kB Secure” found on the i.MX8X itself, the module can be ordered with 512 MB to 4 GB of LPDDR4 RAM and 64 MB to 256 MB of Micron Octal SPI/DualSPI flash. (Phytec notes that it is an official member of Micron’s Xccela consortium.) You can choose between 128 MB to 1 GB NAND flash or  4GB to 128 GB eMMC.

There’s no onboard wireless, but you get dual GbE controllers (1x onboard, 1x RGMII). You can choose between 2x LVDS and 2x MIPI-DSI. There are MIPI-CSI and parallel camera interfaces, as well as ESAI based audio.

Other I/O available through the 280 pins found on its two banks of dual 70-pin connectors include USB 3.0, USB OTG, PCI/PCIe, and up to 10x I2C. You also get 2x UART, 3x CAN, 6x A/D, and single PWM, keypad, or MMC/SD/SDIO (but only if you choose the eMMC over NAND). For SPI you get a choice of a single Octal connection or 2x “Quad SPI + 3 SPI” interfaces.

 

phyCore-i.MX 8X carrier board
(click image to enlarge)

The 3.3 V module supports an RTC, and offers watchdog and tamper features. Like all the new Phytec modules, you get -40°C to 85°C support. No details were available on the carrier shown in the image above.

phyCORE-i.MX 8M

The 55 mm x 40 mm phyCORE-i.MX 8M joins a growing number of Linux-driven i.MX8M modules including Compulab’s CL-SOM-iMX8, Emcraft’s i.MX 8M SOM, Innocom’s WB10, Seco’s SM-C12, SolidRun’s i.MX8 SOM, and the smallest of the lot to date: Variscite’s 55 x 30mm DART-MX8M. There are also plenty of SBCs to compete with the phyCORE-i.MX 8M-equipped phyBoard-Polaris SBC (see farther below), but like most of the COMs, most have yet to ship.

phyCORE-i.MX 8M top) and block diagram (bottom) (click images to enlarge)

The phyCORE-i.MX 8M supports the NXP i.MX8M Quad and QuadLite, both with 4x Cortex-A53 cores, as well as the dual-core Dual. All are clocked to 1.5 GHz. They all have 266MHz Cortex-M4F cores and Vivante GC7000Lite GPUs, but only the Quad and Dual models support 4Kp60, H.265, and VP9 video capabilities. (NXP also has a Solo model that we have yet to see, which offers a single -A53 core, a Cortex-M4F, and a GC7000nanoUltra GPU.)In addition to the i.MX8M SoC, which offers “128 KB + 32 KB” RAM and the same crypto features found on the i.MX8X, the module ships with the same memory features as the phyCore-i.MX 8X except that it lacks the SPI flash. Once again, you get 512 MB to  4 GB of LPDDR4 RAM and either 128 MB to 1 GB NAND flash or 4 GB to 128 GB eMMC. There is also SPI driven “Nand/QSPI” flash.

There’s a single GbE controller, and although not listed in the spec list, the product page says that precertified WiFi and Bluetooth BLE 4.2 are onboard and accompanied by antennas.

Multimedia support includes MIPI-DSI, HDMI 2.0, 2x MIPI-CSI, and up to 5x SAI audio. The block diagram also lists eDP, possibly as a replacement for HDMI.

Other interfaces expressed via the dual 200-pin connectors include 2x USB 3.0, 4x UART, 4x I2C, 4x PWM, and single SDIO and PCI/PCIe connections. SPI support includes 2x SPI and the aforementioned Nand/QSPI. The 3.3V module supports an RTC, watchdog, and tamper protections.

phyBoard-Polaris SBC

The phyCORE-i.MX 8M is also available soldered onto a carrier board that will be sold as a monolithic phyBoard-Polaris SBC. The 100 mm x 100 mm phyBoard-Polaris SBC features the Quad version of the phyCORE-i.MX 8M clocked to 1.3 GHz, loaded with 1 GB KPDDR4 and 8 GB eMMC. The SBC also adds a microSD slot.

phyBoard-Polaris SBC
(click image to enlarge)

The phyBoard-Polaris SBC is further equipped with single GbE, USB 3.0 and USB OTG ports. There’s also an RS-232 port and MIPI-DSI and SAID audio interfaces made available via A/V connectors. Dual MIPI-CSI interfaces are also onboard.A mini-PCIe slot and GPIO slot are available for expansion. The latter includes SPI, UART, JTAG, NAND, USB, SPDIF and DIO.

Other features include a reset button, RTC with coin cell, and JTAG via a debug adapter (PEB-EVAL). There’s a 12 V – 24 V input and adapter, and the board offers the same industrial temperature support as all the new Phytec modules.

phyCORE-i.MX 8

The phyCORE-i.MX 8, which is said to be “ideal for image and speech recognition,” is the third module we’ve seen to support NXP’s top-of-the-line, 64-bit i.MX8 series. The module supports all three flavors of i.MX8 while the other two COMs we’ve seen have been limited to the high-end QuadMax: Toradex’s Apalis iMX8 and iWave’s iW-RainboW-G27M.

phyCORE-i.MX 8 (top) and block diagram (bottom)
(click images to enlarge)

Like Rockchip’s RK3399, NXP’s hexa-core i.MX8 QuadMax features dual high-end Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 1.6 GHz plus four Cortex-A53 cores. The i.MX8 QuadPlus design is the same, but with only one Cortex-A72 core, and the quad has no -A72 cores.All three i.MX8 models provide two Cortex-M4F cores for real-time processing, a Tensilica HiFi 4 DSP, and two Vivante GC7000LiteXS/VX GPUs. The SoC’s “full-chip hardware-based virtualization, resource partitioning and split GPU and display architecture enable safe and isolated execution of multiple systems on one processor,” says Phytec.

The 73 mm x 45 mm phyCORE-i.MX 8 supports up to 8 GB LPDDR4 RAM, according to the product page highlights list, while the spec list itself says 1 GB to 64 GB. Like the phyCORE-i.MX 8X, the module provides 64 MB to 256 MB of Micron Octal SPI/DualSPI flash. There’s no NAND option, but you get 4 GB to 128 GB eMMC.

The phyCORE-i.MX 8 lacks WiFi, but you get dual GbE controllers. Other features expressed via the 480 connection pins include single USB 3.0, USB OTG, and PCIe 2.0 based SATA interfaces. Dual PCIe interfaces are also available

The module provides a 4K-ready HDMI output, 2x LVDS, and 2x MIPI-DSI for up 4x simultaneous HD screens. For image capture you get 2x MIPI-CSI and an HDMI input. Audio features are listed as “2x ESAI up to 4 SAI.”

The phyCORE-i.MX 8 is further equipped with I/O including 2x UART, 2x CAN, 2x MMC/SD/SDIO, 8x A/D, up to 19x I2C, and a PWM interface. For SPI, you get “up to 4x + 1x QSPI.” The module supports an RTC and offers industrial temperature support.

phyCORE-i.MX 8 carrier board (click image to enlarge)

In addition to the unnamed carrier board for the phyCORE-i.MX 8 module shown above, Phytec plans to produce a “Machine Vision and Camera kit” to exploit i.MX8 multimedia features including the VPU, the Vivante GPU’s Vulkan and OGL support, and interfaces including MIPI-DSI, MIPI-CSI, HDMI, and LVDS. In addition, the company will offer rapid prototyping services for customizing customer-specific hardware I/O platforms.Finally, Phytec is planning to develop a smaller, Pico-ITX form factor SBC based on the i.MX8 SoC, and it’s taking a novel approach to do so. The company has launched a Cre-8 community which intends to crowdsource the SBC. The company is seeking developers to join this alpha-stage project to contribute ideas. We saw no promises of open source hardware support, however.

Further information

[As of March 29] No availability information was provided for the phyCORE-i.MX 8X, phyCORE-i.MX 8M, or phyCORE-i.MX 8 modules, but the phyCORE-i.MX 8M-based phyBoard-Polaris is due in the third quarter. More information may be found in Phytec’s phyCORE-i.MX 8X, phyCORE-i.MX 8M, and phyCORE-i.MX 8 product pages as well as the phyBoard-Polaris SBC product page. More on development kits for all these boards may be found here.

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on March 29.

Phytec issue a Press Release announcing these products on April 19.
UPDATE: “Early access program sampling for the phyCORE-i.MX8 and phyCORE-i.MX8M is planned for Q3 2018, with general availability expected in Q4 2018.”

Phytec | www.phytec.eu

SMARC Module Features Hexa-Core i.MX8 QuadMax

By Eric Brown

iWave has unveiled a rugged, wireless enabled SMARC module with 4 GB LPDDR4 and dual GbE controllers that runs Linux or Android on NXP’s i.MX8 QuadMax SoC with 2x Cortex-A72, 4x -A53, 2x -M4F and 2x GPU cores.

iW-RainboW-G27M (front)

iWave has posted specs for an 82 mm x 50 mm, industrial temperature “iW-RainboW-G27M” SMARC 2.0 module that builds on NXP’s i.MX8 QuadMax system-on-chip. The i.MX8 QuadMax was announced in Oct. 2016 as the higher end model of an automotive focused i.MX8 Quad family.

Although the lower-end, quad-core, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M SoC was not fully announced until after the hexa-core Quad, we’ve seen far more embedded boards based on the
i.MX8M , including a recent Seco SM-C12

iW-RainboW-G27M (back)

SMARC module. The only other i.MX8 Quad based product we’ve seen is Toradex’s QuadMax driven Apalis iMX8 module. The Apalis iMX8 was announced a year ago, but is still listed as “coming soon.”

 

 

i.MX8 Quad block diagram (dashed lines indicate model-specific features) (click image to enlarge)

 

Like Rockchip’s RK3399, NXP’s i.MX8 QuadMax features dual high-end Cortex-A72 cores and four Cortex-A53 cores. NXP also offers a similar i.MX8 QuadPlus design with only one Cortex-A72 core.

The QuadMax clock rates are lower than on the RK3399, which clocks to 1.8 GHz (A72) and 1.2 GHz (A53). Toradex says the Apalis iMX8’s -A72 and -A53 cores will clock to 1.6 GHz and 1.2 GHz, respectively.

Close-up of i.MX8 QuadMax on iW-RainboW-G27M

Whereas the i.MX8M has one 266 MHz Cortex-M4F microcontroller, the Quad SoCs have two. A HIFI4 DSP is also onboard, along with a dual-core Vivante GC7000LiteXS/VX GPU, which is alternately referred to as being two GPUs in one or having a split GPU design.

iWave doesn’t specifically name these coprocessors except to list features including a “4K H.265 decode and 1080p H.264 enc/dec capable VPU, 16-Shader 3D (Vec4), and Enhanced Vision Capabilities (via GPU).” The SoC is also said to offer a “dual failover-ready display controller.” The CPUs, meanwhile, are touted for their “full chip hardware virtualization capabilities.”

Inside the iW-RainboW-G27M

Like iWave’s SMARC 2.0 form factor Snapdragon 820 SOM, the iW-RainboW-G27M supports Linux and Android, in this case running Android Nougat (7.0) or higher. (Toradex’s Apalis iMX8 supports Linux, and also supports FreeRTOS running on the Cortex-M4F MCUs.)

Like Toradex, iWave is not promoting the automotive angle that was originally pushed by NXP. iWave’s module is designed to “offer maximum performance with higher efficiency for complex embedded application of consumer, medical and industrial embedded computing applications,” says iWave.

Like the QuadMax based Apalis iMX8, as well as most of the i.MX8M products we’ve seen, the iW-RainboW-G27M supports up to 4 GB LPDDR4 RAM and up to 16 GB eMMC. iWave notes that the RAM and eMMC are “expandable,” but does not say to what capacities. There’s also a microSD slot and 256 MB of optional QSPI flash.

Whereas Apalis iMX8 has a single GbE controller, iWave’s COM has two. It similarly offers onboard 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth (4.1). The Microchip ATWILC3000-MR110CA module, which juts out a bit on one side, is listed by Digi-Key as 802.11b/g/n, but iWave has it as 802.11ac.

Interfaces expressed via the SMARC edge connector include 2x GbE, 2x USB 3.0 host (4-port hub), 4x USB 2.0 host, and USB 2.0 OTG. Additional SMARC I/O includes 3x UART (2x with CTS & RTS), 2x CAN, 2x I2C, 12x GPIO, and single PCIe, SATA, debug UART, SD, SPI and QSPI

Media features include an HDMI/DP transmitter, dual-channel LVDS or MIPI-DSI, and an SSI/I2S audio interface. iWave also lists HDMI, 2x LVDS, SPDIF, and ESAI separately under “expansion connector interfaces.” Other expansion I/O is said to include MLB, CAN and GPIO.

The 5 V module supports -40 to 80°C temperatures. There is no mention of a carrier board.

Further information

No pricing or availability was listed for the iW-RainboW-G27M, but a form is available for requesting a quote. More information may be found on iWave’s iW-RainboW-G27M product page.

iWave | www.iwavesystems.com

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on March 13.

Commell Launches its First ARM-Based Pico-ITX

By Eric Brown

Commell has announced the LP-150, a Rockchip RK3128 based Pico-ITX SBC that appears to be its first ARM-based embedded board of any kind. The 100 mm x 72 mm LP-150 is the only ARM-based SBC out of the many dozens of mostly Intel-based boards listed on Commell’s SBC page.

Shipping with Android 4.4.4, but also supporting Linux, the LP-150 is intended primarily for imaging, machine vision and digital signage applications. Other Commell Pico-ITX SBCs include its Intel Braswell based LP-176.

Commell LP-150

Rockchip’s quad-core, Cortex-A7 RK3128 hasn’t seen as much uptake in the embedded world as the quad -A17 RK3288, which is found on hacker boards such as the Firefly-RK3288 Reload or the high-end, hexa-core RK3399, which has appeared on numerous recent products such as OpenEmbed’s em3399 module or Aaeon’s RICO-3399 PICO-ITX SBC. The only RK3128-based SBC we can recall is the open spec Firefly-FirePrime S.

The LP-150 SBC has a fairly modest feature set, with only 512 MB DDR3. Yet, it offers a few features you don’t typically find on x86 Pico-ITX SBCs like eMMC storage (8GB) and built-in Wi-Fi. Media features include an HDMI 1.4 port limited to HD resolution and an LVDS interface with capacitive touchscreen support. You also get CVBS inputs and outputs and audio I/O headers.

The LP-150 is further equipped with a GbE port and USB 2.0 host and OTG ports. There is also an RTC with battery, and a smattering of RS-232, UART, and GPIO interfaces.

Specifications listed for the Commell LP-150 include:

  • Processor — Rockchip RK3128 (4x Cortex-A7 @ 1.3 GHz); Mali-400 MP2 GPU with OpenGL ES1.1 and 2.0, OpenVG1.1
  • Memory — 512 MB DDR3
  • Storage — 8 GB eMMC; microSD slot
  • Display:
    • HDMI 1.4 port for up to 1080p
    • Single-channel 18/24-bit LVDS for up to 1280 x 720 displays or up to 1024 x 600 cap. touchscreens
    • LCD/LVDS panel and inverter connectors
    • CVBS in/out
  • Wireless — Wi-Fi with SMA antenna
  • Networking — Gigabit Ethernet port (RTL8211E)
  • Other I/O:
    • USB 2.0 host port with support for 4-port hub
    • USB 2.0 OTG port
    • 2x RS232 interfaces
    • 3x UART
    • Audio line-out, mic-in headers (Rockchip codec)
    • GPIO header
  • Other features — Power, recovery, reset buttons; RTC with lithium battery; LED
  • Operating temperature — 0 to 70°C
  • Power — DC input 5 V
  • Dimensions — 100 mm x 72 mm (Pico-ITX)
  • Operating system — Android 4.4.4; Linux also supported

Further information

No pricing or availability information was provided for the LP-150. More information may be found on Commell’s LP-150 product page.

Commell |  www.commell.com.tw

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on March 6.

NXP IoT Platform Links ARM/Linux Layerscape SoCs to Cloud

By Eric Brown

NXP’s “EdgeScale” suite of secure edge computing device management tools help deploy and manage Linux devices running on LSx QorIQ Layerscape SoCs, and connects them to cloud services.

NXP has added an EdgeScale suite of secure edge computing tools and services to its Linux-based Layerscape SDK for six of its networking oriented LSx QorIQ Layerscape SoCs. These include the quad-core, 1.6 GHz Cortex-A53 QorIQ LS1043A, which last year received Ubuntu Core support, as well as the octa-core, Cortex-A72 LS2088a (see farther below).



Simplified EdgeScale architecture
(click image to enlarge)
The cloud-based IoT suite is designed to remotely deploy, manage, and update edge computing devices built on Layerscape SoCs. EdgeScale bridges edge nodes, sensors, and other IoT devices to cloud frameworks, automating the provisioning of software and updates to remote embedded equipment. EdgeScale can be used to deploy container applications and firmware updates, as well as build containers and generate firmware.

The technology leverages the NXP Trust Architecture already built into Layerscape SoCs, which offers Hardware Root of Trust features. These include secure boot, secure key storage, manufacturing protection, hardware resource isolation, and runtime tamper detection.

The EdgeScale suite provides three levels of management: a “point-and-click” dashboard, a Command-Line-Interface (CLI), and the RESTful API, which enables “integration with any cloud computing framework,” as well as greater UI customization. The platform supports Ubuntu, Yocto, OpenWrt, or “any custom Linux distribution.”


Detailed EdgeScale architecture (above) and feature list (below)
(click images to enlarge)
EdgeScale supports cloud frameworks including Amazon’s AWS Greengrass, Alibaba’s Aliyun, Google Cloud, and Microsoft’s Azure IoT Edge. The latter was part of a separate announcement released in conjunction with the EdgeScale release that said that all Layerscape SoCs were being enabled with “secure execution for Azure IoT Edge computing running networking, data analytics, and compute-intensive machine learning applications.”

A year ago, NXP announced a Modular IoT Framework, which was described as a set of pre-integrated NXP hardware and software for IoT, letting customers mix and match technologies with greater assurance of interoperability. When asked how this was related to EdgeScale, Sam Fuller, head of system solutions for NXP’s digital networking group, replied: “EdgeScale is designed to manage higher level software that could have a role of processing the data and managing the communication to/from devices built from the Modular IoT Framework.”


LS102A block diagram
(click image to enlarge)
The EdgeScale suite supports the following QorIQ Layerscape processors:

  • LS102A — 80 0MHz single-core, Cortex-A53 with 1 W power consumption found on F&S’ efus A53LS module
  • LS1028A — dual-core ARMv8 with Time-Sensitive Networking (TSN)
  • LS1043A — 1.6 GHz quad-core, Cortex-A53 with 1 0GbE support, found on the QorIQ LS1043A 10G Residential Gateway Reference Design and the X-ES XPedite6401 XMC/PrPMC mezzanine module
  • LS1046A — quad-core, Cortex-A72 with dual 10 GbE support (also available in dual-core LS1026A model)
  • LS1088a — 1.5 GHz octa-core, Cortex-A53 with dual 10 GbE support, which is also supported on the XPedite6401
  • LS2088a — 2.0 GHz octa-core, Cortex-A72 with 128-bit NEON-based SIMD engine for each core, plus a 10GbE XAUI Fat Pipe interface or 4x 10GBASE-KR — found on X-ES XPedite6370 SBC.

Further information

NXP’s EdgeScale will be available by the end of the month. More information may be found on its EdgeScale product page.

NXP Semiconductors | www.nxp.com

This article originally appeared on LinuxGizmos.com on March 16.

Rugged IoT Gateway Facilitates Quick Deployment

Axiomtek has introduced its latest RISC-based, DIN-rail industrial IoT gateway, the IFB125. It is powered by the Freescale i.MX6UL processor with the ARM Cortex-A7 microarchitecture. This compact IoT gateway is designed for versatility of use and quick deployment. The IFB125 is suitable for a variety of applications including applications that require remote control and monitoring management functions such as unmanned control, industrial automation, automatic parking lot control, traffic light control and more.

The IFB125 comes with multiple I/O connections including one RS-232/422/485 port, two 10/100 Mbps LAN ports, one USB 2.0 port, one 2-IN/1-OUT DIO, one I2C and one SPI. This embedded IoT gateway platform is equipped with one PCI Express Mini Card slot and one SIM card slot for wireless connectivity. It has a 256 MB onboard memory that features a fast data transfer rate of DDR3-1600. The robust IFB125 has an extended operating temperature range from -40°C to 70°C and can withstand vibration up to 5G. Its wide voltage range of 9V  to 48 V DC power input with a lockable terminal block-type connector makes it suitable for use in harsh environments. The IFB125 comes with an embedded Linux operating system (Yocto) to provide an open standard OS for software program development.

Features:

  • Fanless and compact gateway with a RISC-based (i.MX6UltraLite) processor at 528 MHz
  • 256 MB DDR3 SDRAM and 8 GB eMMC Flash onboard
  • SPI and I2C function with 3.3 V power
  • Multiple I/O options include one wireless socket for Wi-Fi or 3G/4G, two digital inputs, one digital output and two LAN ports
  • Wide operating temperature range of -40°C to +70°C
  • Power input range of 9V to 48V DC with terminal block
  • Ready-to-run embedded Linux operating system (Yocto)

Axiomtek | www.us.axiomtek.com

Engineering Samples Roll for Low Power NXP i.MX 6 UL COM

Technologic Systems has announced that their latest Computer-on-Module, the TS-4100, has entered into their engineering sampling program. The TS-4100 is the first Technologic Systems Computer-on-Module to with the NXP i.MX 6 UltraLite processor, featuring a single ARM Cortex A7 core, operating at speeds up to 695 MHz. The NXP i.MX 6UL processors offer scalable performance and multimedia support, along with low power consumption. The board takes full advantage of the integrated power management module to optimize power sequencing throughout the board design. This enables it to achieve 300 mW typical power usage, making this COM well suited for embedded applications with strict power requirements. The TS-4100 is design for industrial embedded applications for medical, automotive, industrial automation, smart energy and more.

The TS-4100 is Technologic Systems’ first COM module that can also be a standalone micro Single Board Computer. When powered from the on-board micro USB connector, the TS-4100 does not require a baseboard to operate. The system could be a processing node on a Wi-Fi or Bluetooth network, or with the optional daughter card expansion connector it could interact with other devices directly.
The TS-4100 FPGA includes a ZPU core implementation. The ZPU allows for offloading CPU tasks as well as harder real-time on I/O interactions. The ZPU is an open-source, 32-bit, stack-based CPU architecture that offers a full GCC tool suite. Inside of the TS-4100 FPGA it is given 8 kbytes of BlockRAM and has full access to all FPGA I/O. Additionally, the CPU has shared access to the ZPU BlockRAM. This allows for a larger bi-directional communication channel between the ZPU and main CPU TS-4100, and can be used to reprogram the ZPU on the fly for dynamic applications.

 

The TS-4100 can be paired with the TS-8551 development baseboard for development. The TS-8551 brings out all of the TS-4100 connectivity options for engineers to use in developing their custom applications. Additionally the TS-8551 includes the example circuit for the TS-SILO technology, an optional feature which will provide up to 30 seconds of reserve power in the event of a power failure. The TS-8551 can also be used as a reference design board for engineers creating an application specific custom design. Technologic Systems offers free schematic reviews for TS-4100 baseboard designs.

The TS-4100 starts at $157 in single units, with volume discounts reaching $119. The TS-8551-4100 Evaluation Kit is also available now and includes the TS-8551 development board along with all of the accessories needed to start development.

Technologic Systems | www.embeddedarm.com

MPU-Based SOM Meets Industrial IoT Linux Needs

Microchip Technology has unveiled a new System on Module (SOM) featuring the SAMA5D2 microprocessor (MPU). The ATSAMA5D27-SOM1 contains the recently released ATSAMA5D27C-D1G-CU System in Package (SiP). The SOM simplifies IoT design by integrating the power management, non-volatile boot memory, Ethernet PHY and high-speed DDR2 memory onto a small, single-sided printed circuit board (PCB). There is a great deal of design effort and complexity associated with creating an industrial-grade MPU-based system running a Linux operating system. Even developers with expertise in the area spend a lot of time on PCB layout to guarantee signal integrity for the high-speed interfaces to DDR memory and PHY while complying with EMC standards.

The SAMA5D2 family of products provides an extremely flexible design experience no matter the level of expertise. For example, the SOM—which integrates multiple external components and eliminates key design challenges around EMI, ESD and signal integrity—can be used to expedite development time. Customers can solder the SOM to their board and take it to production, or it can be used as a reference design along with the free schematics, design and Gerber files and complete bill of materials which are available online. Customers can also transition from the SOM to the SiP or the MPU itself, depending on their design needs. All products are backed by Microchip’s customer-driven obsolescence policy which ensures availability to customers for as long as needed.

The Arm Cortex-A5-based SAMA5D2 SiP, mounted on the SOM PCB or available separately, integrates 1 Gbit of DDR2 memory, further simplifying the design by removing the high- speed memory interface constraints from the PCB. The impedance matching is done in the package, not manually during development, so the system will function properly at normal and low- speed operation. Three DDR2 memory sizes (128 Mb, 512 Mb and 1 Gb) are available for the SAMA5D2 SiP and optimized for bare metal, RTOS and Linux implementations.

Microchip customers developing Linux-based applications have access to the largest set of device drivers, middleware and application layers for the embedded market at no charge. All of Microchip’s Linux development code for the SiP and SOM are mainlined in the Linux communities. This results in solutions where customers can connect external devices, for which drivers are mainlined, to the SOM and SIP with minimal software development.

The SAMA5D2 family features the highest levels of security in the industry, including PCI compliance, providing an excellent platform for customers to create secured designs. With integrated Arm TrustZone and capabilities for tamper detection, secure data and program storage, hardware encryption engine, secure boot and more, customers can work with Microchip’s security experts to evaluate their security needs and implement the level of protection that’s right for their design. The SAMA5D2 SOM also contains Microchip’s QSPI NOR Flash memory, a Power Management Integrated Circuit (PMIC), an Ethernet PHY and serial EEPROM memory with a Media Access Control (MAC) address to expand design options.

The SOM1-EK1 development board provides a convenient evaluation platform for both the SOM and the SiP. A free Board Support Package (BSP) includes the Linux kernel and drivers for the MPU peripherals and integrated circuits on the SOM. Schematics and Gerber files for the SOM are also available.

The ATSAMA5D2 SiP is available in four variants starting with the ATSAMA5D225C-D1M- CU in a 196-lead BGA package for $8.62 each in 10,000 units. The ATSAMA5D27-SOM1 is available now for $39.00 each in 100 units The ATSAMA5D27-SOM1-EK1 development board is available for $245.00.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com