55-nm ULP Physical IP Solution for Energy-Efficient Applications

ARM and United Microelectronics Corporation (UMC) recently announced the availability of a new ARM Artisan physical IP solution on 55 nm to accelerate the development of ARM processor-based embedded systems and Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

UMC’s 55-nm ultra-low-power process (55ULP) technology is emerging as an ideal solution for energy-efficient IoT applications. The new physical IP offering will enable silicon design teams to speed up and simplify the bring-up of ARM-based SoC designs for IoT and other embedded applications.

For many energy-constrained applications, maximizing battery life is critical to a successful design. The Artisan physical IP platform will enhance the ULP technology from UMC with the intent to maximize power efficiency and reduce leakage. Features such as thick gate oxide support and long, multi-channel library options give SoC designers multiple tools to help optimize IoT applications.

The Artisan libraries will support:

  • The 0.9-V ultra-low voltage domain, thereby saving up to 44% dynamic power and 25% leakage power when compared to 1.2-V domain operation
  • Multichannel libraries with multiple Vts to offer SoC designers leakage and performance options. Long channel libraries can be used to further reduce leakage by up to 80%. The Power Management Kit (PMK) enables both active and leakage power mitigation.
  • Innovative thick gate oxide library will offer dramatically reduced leakage (350× lower than regular standard cells) for always ON cells. The ability of this library to interface with higher voltages (including battery voltages used in IoT devices) can also offer the advantage of negating the need for a voltage regulator.
  • Next generation high-density memory compilers offer multiple integrated power modes to save state while minimizing standby leakage. Utilizing these modes will allow SoC designers to realize up to 95% lower leakage when compared to regular standby.

The UMC-based physical IP for 55ULP is available immediately via ARM’s DesignStart portal.

Source: ARM

Ultra-Low Power Wi-Fi Platform for IoT Applications

Atmel and MXCHIP recently announced that they’re jointly developing an ultra-low power Internet of Things (IoT) platform with secure Wi-Fi access to the cloud, enabling designers to quickly bring IoT devices to market. The platform combines Atmel’s ultra-low power SMART SAM G ARM Cortex-M4-based MCUs and its SmartConnect WILC1000 Wi-Fi solution with MXCHIP’s MiCO IoT operating system (OS), servicing a full range of smart device developers for IoT applications. The integrated platform is intended to give IoT designers the confidence that their battery-operated devices will have longer battery life and their data will be securely transferred to the cloud.

Atmel’s WILC1000 is an IEEE 802.11b/g/n IoT link controller leveraging its ultra-low power Wi-Fi transceiver with a fully integrated power amplifier. This solution delivers the industry’s best communication range of up to +20.5-dBm output, ideal for connected home devices. Integrated in packages as small as a 3.2 mm × 3.2 mm WLCSP, the Atmel WILC1000 link controller leverages in this platform Atmel’s SAM G MCU, an ideal solution for low-power IoT applications and optimized for lower power consumption, incorporating large SRAM, high performance and operating efficiency with floating-point unit in an industry-leading 2.84 mm × 2.84 mm package. When combined with secure Wi-Fi technology, the joint IoT platform connects directly to each other or to a local area network (LAN), enabling remote system monitoring or control. For increased security, the platform comes with an optional Atmel ATECC508A, which is the industry’s first crypto device to integrate ECDH key agreement, making it easy to add confidentiality to digital systems including IoT nodes used in home automation, industrial networking, accessory and consumable authentication, medical, mobile and other applications.

 

To accelerate the IoT design process, the platform includes the MiCOKit-G55 development kit, technical documentation, application notes and a software development kit.

Source: Atmel

New High-Performance VC Z Series Cameras

Vision Components recently announced the availability of its new intelligent camera series VC Z. The embedded systems offer real-time image processing suitable for demanding high-speed and line scan applications. All models are equipped with Xilinx’s Zynq module, an ARM dual-core Cortex-A9 with 866 MHz and an integrated FPGA.Vision Components - VC_Z_series_stapel_pingu

The new camera is based on the board camera series VCSBC nano Z. With a footprint of 40 × 65 mm, these compact systems are especially easy to integrate into machines and plants. They are optionally available with one or two remote sensor heads and thus suitable for stereo applications.You can choose between two enclosed camera types: the VC nano Z, which has housing dimensions of 80 × 45 × 20 mm, and the VC pro Z, which measures 90 × 58 × 36 mm and can be fitted with a lens and an integrated LED illumination. The new operating system VC Linux ensures optimal interaction between hardware and software.

Source: Vision Components

New XMC4800 Microcontrollers with EtherCAT Technology Support Industry 4.0

Infineon Technologies AG has launched a new XMC4800 series of 32-bit microcontrollers with on-chip Ethernet for Control Automation Technology (EtherCAT) node. With its real-time capability, the XMC4800 series is intended to drive networked industrial automation and Industry 4.0 applications.Infineon XMC4800

The EtherCAT node is integrated on an ARM Cortex-M-based microcontroller with on-chip flash and analog/mixed signal capability. The XMC4800 series comprises at least 18 members varying in memory capacity, temperature range and packaging. All XMC4800 microcontrollers will be AEC Q100 qualified, making them also suited for use in commercial, construction, and agricultural vehicles.

The XMC4800 series is a member of the XMC4000 family, which uses the ARM Cortex-M4 processor and was specifically developed for use in the automation of manufacturing and buildings as well as electric drives and solar inverters. The XMC4800 series offers a seamless upgrade path to EtherCAT technology with pin and code compatibility to the established XMC4000 microcontrollers. The XMC4800 enables the use of EtherCAT under the harsh condition of up to 125°C ambient temperature.

 

With the integration of the EtherCAT functionality, the XMC4800 enables the most compact design without need for a dedicated EtherCAT ASIC, external memory and clock crystal. It offers a 144-MHz-CPU, up to 2 MB of embedded flash memory, 352 KB of RAM and a comprehensive range of peripheral and interface functions. The peripherals include four parallel fast 12-bit A/D converter modules, two 12-bit D/A converters, four delta sigma demodulator modules, six capture/compare units (CCU4 and CCU8), and two positioning interface modules. In addition to its EtherCAT functionality, its communication functions comprise interfaces for Ethernet, USB, and SD/MMC. Also, the XMC4800 series offers six CAN nodes, six serial communication channels, and one external bus interface for communication. The three package options are LQFP-100, LQFP-144, and LFBGA-196.

Samples of the series XMC4800 with EtherCAT technology will be available in August 2015. Volume production is scheduled for Q1 2016.

Source: Infineon 

 

 

Toshiba Expands TX04 Range of ARM Cortex-M4F-Based Microcontrollers

Toshiba Electronics Europe has announced a new ARM Cortex-M4F based microcontroller for use in secure systems control. The TMPM46BF10FG expands its existing TX04 range and adds enhanced security features that are well-suited to applications in Internet of Things (IoT) devices, energy management systems, sensor technology, and industrial equipment.Toshiba TMPM46BF10FG

Users of secure communications control systems increasingly require mass memory data for firmware generation management, failure analysis, and high-precision consecutive data storage. The TMPM46BF10FG meets these requirements for high-level security features, such as tamper detection and information concealment. The IC also meets the need to reduce the number of parts on system circuit board by supporting large capacity memory.

Featuring an ARM Cortex-M4F core, with a maximum operating frequency of 120 MHz, the TMPM46BF10FG incorporates 1,024 KB of flash memory and 514-KB SRAM required for secure communications control, four types of security circuits for network communications. The microcontroller also integrates an SLC NAND flash memory controller and 4- and 8-bit error correction circuitry (BCH ECC) that supports memory expansion with 1-to-4-Gb SLC NAND flash memory chips.

To provide additional levels of safety, the IC includes a 16-channel interrupt input and a clock-independent watchdog timer, which operates separately from the system clock, improving the safety of system functions. In the case of a system clock malfunction, the watchdog timer is still capable of detecting errors.

The TMPM46BF10FG incorporates a true random number generator (TRNG: SP800-90C standard) through the combination of a random entropy seed generation (ESG) circuit and Hash-DRGB created by the secure hash processor (SHA) and software program. This meets the robust standards of security that are required in network communications. The hardware based AES encryption/decryption process meets FIPS180-4 and FIPS197 standards and reduces the load on the CPU, in combination with a random seed generation circuit (ESG), and a multiple-length arithmetic (MLA) used to calculate elliptic curves for asymmetric ciphers.

The TMPM46BF10FG features direct memory access (32 channel), a 12-bit AD converter (8 channel), 16-bit timer (8 channel), SPP (3 channel), SIO/UART (4 channel), full UART (2 channel) I2C (3 channel), with an operating voltage of 2.7 to 3.6 V. Housed in an LQFP100 package, the IC measures just 14 mm × 14 mm, with a 0.5-mm pitch.

Samples are now available. Mass production will begin in October.

Source: Toshiba

 

 

ARM MCUs wtith Capacitive Touch Hardware Support for HMI and LIN Applications

Atmel recently announced its next-generation family of automotive-qualified ARM Cortext-M0+-based micrcontrollers with an integrated peripheral touch controller (PTC) for capacitive touch applications. The new SAM DA1 is the first series in this Atmel |SMART MCU automotive-qualified product family, operating at a maximum frequency of 48 MHz and reaching a 2.14 Coremark/MHz.Atmel Corporation SAM DA1

Atmel’s SAM DA1 series is ideal for capacitive touch button, slider, wheel or proximity sensing applications and offers high analog performance for greater front-end flexibility. The new devices are available down to a very compact QFN 5 × 5 mm package with wettable flanks for automated optical inspection.

Eliminating external components and offering more robust features, devices in the SAM DA1 series come with 32 to 64 pins, up to 64 KB of flash memory, 8 KB of SRAM, and 2-KB read-while-write flash memory and are qualified according to the AEC Q-100 Grade 2 (–40° to 105°C).

Key Features of Atmel’s SAM DA1 Series

  • Atmel |SMART ARM Cortex-M0+-based processor
  • 45 DMIPS
  • Vcc 2.7 to 3.63 V
  • 16- to 64-KB Flash; 32 to 64 pins
  • Up to six SERCOM (Serial Communication Interface), USB, I2S
  • Peripheral Touch Controller
  • Complex PWM
  • AEC Q100 Grade 2 Qualified

To accelerate the design development, the ATSAMDA1-XPRO development kit is available to support the new devices. The new SAM DA1 series is also supported by Atmel Studio, Atmel Software Framework and debuggers.

Contact Atmel to sample the SAM DA1 series.

Source: Atmel

Quad Channel DPWM Step-Down Controller

Exar Corp. has introduced the XR77128, a universal PMIC that drives up to four independently controlled external DrMOS power stages at currents greater than 40 A for the latest 64-bit ARM processors, FPGAs, DSPs and ASICs. DrMOS technology is quickly growing in popularity in telecom and networking applications. These same applications find value in Exar’s Programmable Power technology which allows low component count, rapid development, easy system integration, dynamic control and telemetry. Depending on output current requirements, each output can be independently configured to directly drive external MOSFETs or DrMOS power stages.EX045_XR77128

The XR77128 is quickly configured to power nearly any FPGA, SoC, or DSP system through the use of Exar’s design tool, PowerArchitect, and programmed through an I²C-based SMBus compliant serial interface. It can also monitor and dynamically control and configure the power system through the same I²C interface. Five configurable GPIOs allow for fast system integration for fault reporting and status or for sequencing control.  A new Arduino-based development platform allows software engineers to begin code development for telemetry and dynamic control long before their hardware is available.

The XR77128 is available in a RoHS-compliant, green/halogen free space-saving 7 mm × 7 mm TQFN. It costs $7.75 in 1000-piece quantities.

Source: Exar Corp.

Read Your Technical Documentation (EE Tip #145)

Last year we had a problem that showed up only after we started making the product in 1,000-piece runs. The problem was that some builds of the system took a very long time to power up. We had built about 10 prototypes, tested the design over thousands of power ups, and it tested just fine (thanks to POC-IT). Then the 1,000-piece run uncovered about a half-dozen units that had variable power-up times—ranging from a few seconds to more than an hour! Replacing the watchdog chip that controlled the RESET line to an ARM9 processor fixed the problem.

But why did these half dozen fail?

Many hours into the analysis we discovered that the RESET line out of the watchdog chip on the failed units would pulse but stay low for long periods of time. A shot of cold air instantly caused the chip to release the RESET. Was it a faulty chip lot? Nope. Upon a closer read of the documentation, we found that you cannot have a pull-up resister on the RESET line. For years we always had pull-ups on RESET lines. We’d missed that in the documentation.

Like it or not, we have to pour over the documentation of the chips and software library calls we use. We have to digest the content carefully. We cannot rely on what is intuitive.

Finally, and this is much more necessary than in years past, we have to pour over the errata sheets. And we need to do it before we commit the design. A number of years ago, a customer designed a major new product line around an Atmel ARM9. This ARM9 had the capability of directly addressing NOR memory up to 128 MB. Except for the fact that the errata said that due to a bug it could only address 16 MB. Ouch! Later we had problems with the I2C bus in the same chip. At times, the bus would lock up and nothing except a power cycle would unlock it. Enter the errata. Under some unmentioned conditions the I2C state machine can lock up. Ouch! In this case, we were able to use a bit-bang algorithm rather than the built-in I2C—but obviously at the cost of money, scheduling, and real time.—Bob Japenga, CC25, 2013

Embedded SOM with Linux-Based RTOS

National Instruments has introduced an embedded system-on-module (SOM) development board with integrated Linux-based real-time operating system (RTOS).NIsom

Processing power in the 2” x 3” SOM comes from a Xilinx Zync-7020 all programmable SOC running a dual core ARM Cortex-A9 at 667 MHz. A built-in, low-power Artix-7 FPGA offers 160 single-ended I/Os and Its dedicated processor I/O include Gigabit Ethernet USB 2.0 host, USB 2.0 host/device, SDHC, RS-232, and Tx/Rx. The SOM’s power requirements are typically 3 to 5 W.

The SOM integrates a validated board support package (BSP) and device drivers together with the National Instruments Linux real-time OS. The SOM board is supplied with a full suite of middleware for developing an embedded OS, custom software drivers, and other common software components.

The LabVIEW FPGA graphical development platform eliminates the need for expertise in the design approach using a hardware description language.

[Via Elektor]

 

New DSP “Lab-in-a-Box” for ARM-Based Audio Systems

Cambridge, UK-based, ARM and its partners will start shipping a DSP “Lab-in-a-Box” (LiB) to universities worldwide to help boost practical skills development and the creation of new ARM-based audio systems. This will include products such as high-definition home media and voice-controlled home automation systems. The LiB kits contain ARM Cortex-M4-based microcontroller boards by STMicroelectronics and audio cards from Wolfson Microelectronics and Farnell element14.ARMDSPLiBWeb

As the centerpiece of the ARM University Program, LiB packages offer ARM-based technology and high-quality teaching and training materials that support electronics and computer engineering courses. DSP courses have traditionally used software simulation packages, or hands-on labs using relatively expensive development kits costing around $300 per student. By comparison, this new DSP LiB will cost around $50 and will allow students to practice theory with advanced hardware sourced from widely-available products.

“Our Lab-in-a-Box offerings are proving hugely popular in universities because of the low-cost access to state-of-the-art technology,” said Khaled Benkrid, manager of the Worldwide University Program, ARM. “The DSP kits, powered by ARM Cortex-M4-based processors, enable high performance yet energy-efficient digital signal processing at a very affordable price. We expect to see them being used by students to create commercially-viable audio applications and it’s another great example of our partnership supporting engineers in training and beyond.”

The DSP LiB will begin shipping to universities in July 2014. It is the latest in a series of initiatives led by ARM which span multiple academic topics including embedded systems design, programming and SoC design. The DSP kits will also be offered to developers outside academia at a later date.

[via audioXpress.com]

Client Profile: ARM, Ltd.

ARM, Ltd.

ARM, Ltd.
110 Fulbourn Road
Cambridge, GB-CB1 9NJ,
Great Britain

www.arm.com
www.arm.com/tools

Contact: sales.us@keil.com

Embedded Products/Services: The ARM tools range offers two software development families that provide you with all the necessary tools for every stage of your software development workflow.

ARM Development Studio 5 (DS-5) provides best-in-class tools for a broad range of ARM processor-based platforms, including application processors and multicore SoCs. Find out more by visiting www.arm.com/products/tools/software-tools/ds-5/index.php.

Keil MDK-ARM is a complete software development toolkit for ARM processor-based microcontrollers. It is the right choice for embedded applications based on the ARM Cortex-M series, ARM7, ARM9, and Cortex-R4 processors. To find out more, visit www.arm.com/products/tools/software-tools/mdk-arm/index.php.

Product Information: The MDK-ARM is a complete software development environment for Cortex-M, Cortex-R4, ARM7, and ARM9 processor-based devices. MDK-ARM is specifically designed for microcontroller applications. It is easy to learn and use, yet powerful enough for the most demanding embedded applications.

The MDK-ARM is available in four editions: MDK-Lite, MDK-Basic, MDK-Standard, and MDK-Professional. All editions provide a complete C/C++ development environment and MDK-Professional includes extensive middleware libraries.

The Future of Data Acquisition Technology

Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio

Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio

By Maurizio Di Paolo Emilio

Data acquisition is a necessity, which is why data acquisition systems and software applications are essential tools in a variety of fields. For instance, research scientists rely on data acquisition tools for testing and measuring their laboratory-based projects. Therefore, as a data acquisition system designer, you must have an in-depth understanding of each part of the systems and programs you create.

I mainly design data acquisition software for physics-related experiments and industrial applications. Today’s complicated physics experiments require highly complex data acquisition systems and software that are capable of managing large amounts of information. Many of the systems require high-speed connections and digital recording. And they must be reconfigurable. Signals that are hard to characterize and analyze with a real-time display are evaluated in terms of high frequencies, large dynamic range, and gradual changes.

Data acquisition software is typically available in a text-based user interface (TUI) that comprises an ASCII configuration file and a graphic user interface (GUI), which are generally available with any web browser. Both interfaces enable data acquisition system management and customization, and you don’t need to recompile the sources. This means even inexperienced programmers can have full acquisition control.

Well-designed data acquisition and control software should be able to quickly recover from instrumentation failures and power outages without losing any data. Data acquisition software must provide a high-level language for algorithm design. Moreover, it requires data-archiving capability for verifying data integrity.

You have many data acquisition software options. An example is programmable software that uses a language such as C. Other software and data acquisition software packages enable you to design the custom instrumentation suited for specific applications (e.g., National Instruments’s LabVIEW and MathWorks’s MATLAB).

In addition to data acquisition software design, I’ve also been developing embedded data acquisition systems with open-source software to manage user-developed applications. The idea is to have credit-card-sized embedded data acquisition systems managing industrial systems using open-source software written in C. I’m using an ARM processor that will give me the ability to add small boards for specific applications (e.g., a board to manage data transmission via Wi-Fi or GSM).

A data acquisition system’s complexity tends to increase with the number of physical properties it must measure. Resolution and accuracy requirements also affect a system’s complexity. To eliminate cabling and provide for more modularity, you can combine data acquisition capabilities and signal conditioning in one device.

Recent developments in the field of fiber-optic communications have shown longer data acquisition transmission distances can cause errors. Electrical isolation is also an important topic. The goal is to eliminate ground loops (common problems with single-ended measurements) in terms of accuracy and protection from voltage spikes.

During the last year, some new technological developments have proven beneficial to the overall efficacy of data acquisition applications. For instance, advances in USB technology have made data acquisition and storage simpler and more efficient than ever (think “plug and play”). Advances in wireless technology have also made data transmission faster and more secure. This means improved data acquisition system and software technologies will also figure prominently in smartphone design and usage.

If you look to the future, consumer demand for mobile computing systems will only increase, and this will require tablet computers to feature improved data acquisition and storage capabilities. Having the ability to transmit, receive, and store larger amounts of data with tablets will become increasingly important to consumers as time goes on. There are three main things to consider when creating a data acquisition-related application for a tablet. Hardware connectivity: Tablets have few control options (e.g., Wi-Fi and Bluetooth). Program language support: Many tablets support Android apps created in Java. Device driver availability: Device drivers permit a high-level mode to easily and reliably execute a data acquisition board’s functionality. C and LabVIEW are not supported by Android or Apple’s iOS. USB, a common DAQ bus, is available in a set of tablets. In the other case, an adapter is required. In these instances, moving a possible data acquisition system to a tablet requires extra attention.

For all of the aforementioned reasons, I think field-programmable arrays (FPGAs) will figure prominently in the evolution of data acquisition system technology. The flexibility of FPGAs makes them ideal for custom data acquisition systems and embedded applications.

CC25 Is Now Available

Ready to take a look at the past, present, and future of embedded technology, microcomputer programming, and electrical engineering? CC25 is now available.

Check out the issue preview.

We achieved three main goals by putting together this issue. One, we properly documented the history of Circuit Cellar from its launch in 1988 as a bi-monthly magazine
about microcomputer applications to the present day. Two, we gathered immediately applicable tips and tricks from professional engineers about designing, programming, and completing electronics projects. Three, we recorded the thoughts of innovative engineers, academics, and industry leaders on the future of embedded technologies ranging from
rapid prototyping platforms to 8-bit chips to FPGAs.

The issue’s content is gathered in three main sections. Each section comprises essays, project information, and interviews. In the Past section, we feature essays on the early days of Circuit Cellar, the thoughts of long-time readers about their first MCU-based projects, and more. For instance, Circuit Cellar‘s founder Steve Ciarcia writes about his early projects and the magazine’s launch in 1988. Long-time editor/contributor Dave Tweed documents some of his favorite projects from the past 25 years.

The Present section features advice from working hardware and software engineers. Examples include a review of embedded security risks and design tips for ensuring system reliability. We also include short interviews with professionals about their preferred microcontrollers, current projects, and engineering-related interests.

The Future section features essays by innovators such as Adafruit Industries founder Limor Fried, ARM engineer Simon Ford, and University of Utah professor John Regehr on topics such as the future of DIY engineering, rapid prototyping, and small-RAM devices. The section also features two different sets of interviews. In one, corporate leaders such as Microchip Technology CEO Steve Sanghi and IAR Systems CEO Stefan Skarin speculate on the future of embedded technology. In the other, engineers such as Stephen Edwards (Columbia University) offer their thoughts about the technologies that will shape our future.

As you read the issue, ask yourself the same questions we asked our contributors: What’s your take on the history of embedded technology? What can you design and program today? What do you think about the future of embedded technology? Let us know.

CC 25th Anniversary Issue: The Past, Present, and Future of Embedded Design

In celebration of Circuit Cellar’s 25th year of publishing electrical engineering articles, we’ll release a special edition magazine around the start of 2013. The issue’s theme will be the past, present, and future of embedded electronics. World-renowned engineers, innovators, academics, and corporate leaders will provide essays, interviews, and projects on embedded design-related topics such as mixed-signal designs, the future of 8-bit chips, rapid prototyping, FPGAs, graphical user interfaces, embedded security, and much more.

Here are some of the essay topics that will appear in the issue:

  • The history of Circuit Cellar — Steve Ciarcia (Founder, Circuit Cellar, Engineer)
  • Do small-RAM devices have a future? — by John Regehr (Professor, University of Utah)
  • A review of embedded security risks — by Patrick Schaumont (Professor, Virginia Tech)
  • The DIY electronics revolution — by Limor Fried (Founder, Adafruit Industries)
  • The future of rapid prototyping — by Simon Ford (ARM mbed, Engineer)
  • Robust design — by George Novacek (Engineer, Retired Aerospace Executive)
  • Twenty-five essential embedded system design principles — by Bob Japenga (Embedded Systems Engineer, Co-Founder, Microtools Inc.)
  • Mixed-signal designs: the 25 errors you’ll make at least once — by Robert Lacoste (Founder, Alciom; Engineer)
  • User interface tips for embedded designers — by Curt Twillinger (Engineer)
  • Thinking in terms of hardware platforms, not chips — by Clemens Valens (Engineer, Elektor)
  • The future of FPGAs — by Colin O’Flynn (Engineer)
  • The future of e-learning for engineers and programmers — by Marty Hauff (e-Learning Specialist, Altium)
  • And more!

Interviews

We’ll feature interviews with embedded industry leaders and forward-thinking embedded design engineers and programmers such as:

More Content

In addition to the essays and interviews listed above, the issue will also include:

  • PROJECTS will be available via QR codes
  • INFOGRAPHICS depicting tech-related likes, dislikes, and ideas of hundreds of engineers.
  • And a few surprises!

Who Gets It?

All Circuit Cellar subscribers will receive the 25th Anniversary issue. Additionally, the magazine will be available online and promoted by Circuit Cellar’s parent company, Elektor International Media.

Get Involved

Want to get involved? Sponsorship and advertising opportunities are still available. Find out more by contacting Peter Wostrel at Strategic Media Marketing at 978-281-7708 (ext. 100) or peter@smmarketing.us. Inquire about editorial opportunities by contacting the editorial department.

About Circuit Cellar

Steve Ciarcia launched Circuit Cellar magazine in 1988. From its beginning as “Ciarcia’s Circuit Cellar,” a popular, long-running column in BYTE magazine, Ciarcia leveraged his engineering knowledge and passion for writing about it by launching his own publication. Since then, tens of thousands of readers around the world have come to regard Circuit Cellar as the #1 source for need-to-know information about embedded electronics, design, and programming.

DIY 10.1˝ Touchscreen Home Control System

Domotics (home automation) control systems are among the most innovative and rewarding design projects creative electrical engineers can undertake. Let’s take a look at an innovative Beagle Board-based control system that enables a user to control lights with a 10.1˝ capacitive touchscreen.

Domotics control system

The design features the following modules:

• An I/O board for testing purposes
• An LED strip board for controlling an RGB LED strip
• A relay board for switching 230-VAC devices
• An energy meter for measuring on/off (and also for logging)

ELektor editor and engineer Clemens Valens recently interviewed Koen van Dongen about the design. Van Dongen describes the system’s electronics and then demonstrates how to use the touchscreen to control a light and LED strip.

As Valens explains suggests, it would be a worthwhile endeavor to incorporate a Wi-Fi connection to enable cellphone and tablet control. If you build such system, be sure to share it with our staff. Good luck!

CircuitCellar.com is an Elektor International Media website.