Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Analog & Power

Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow. In tomorrow’s newsletter you’ll get news about the products and technologies trends in the analog, mixed-signal and power markets.MAX77756_EVKit_image

This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries and more.

 

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “Analog & Power” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. Embedded boards are critical building blocks around which system developers can build all manor of intelligent systems. The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards.

Don’t Miss Our Bonus Newsletter: FPGA Technologies

As you know, Circuit Cellar’s newsletter covers four key themes each month. But August is a special month with a 5th Tuesday! As result, tomorrow coming to your inbox with be a special bonus newsletter theme: FPGA Technologies. In tomorrow’s newsletter you’ll get news about the products and technologies trends in the FPGA market. FPGAs have sv_gs_diagramevolved to become complete system chips. Today’s FPGAs pack in levels of processing, I/O and memory on one chip that once required several ICs or boards.

Also: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “FPGA Technology” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. Embedded boards are critical building blocks around which system developers can build all manor of intelligent systems. The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards.

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow. In tomorrow’s newsletter you’ll get news about the products and technologies trends in the board-level embedded computer market. Embedded boards are a critical building block around which system developers can build all manor of intelligent systems. PR_EPM-43_HI

The focus here is on both standard and non-standard embedded computer boards that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

 

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “Embedded Boards” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

…and…

August has a 5th Tuesday. So look for a bonus Newsletter this  month!

September Circuit Cellar: A Sneak Preview

The September (326) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine serves up a meaty selection of useful technology resources along with inspiring, interesting embedded electronics design articles.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

cclogo_2013_header

Here’s a sneak preview of September Circuit Cellar:

FOCUS ON MICROCONTROLLERS

Getting Started with PSoC Microcontrollers (Part 3): Data Conversion, Capacitive Sensing and More
In Part 3, Nishant Mittal gets into some if the PSoC’s more complex features like Data Conversion.

Implementing a Time-Oriented Task Manager for 8-bit PIC Microcontrollers
Pedro Bertoleti shows readers how to build a time-oriented task manager using Microchip’s PIC 16F628A 8-bit microcontroller.

SPECIAL SECTION: EMBEDDED SECURITY

Microcontrollers Beef Up Security Features: Defense in a Connected World
Jeff Child explores the various flavors of embedded security features that microcontroller vendors are adding to their devices.

Resources for Embedded Security: Hardware, Software and Services
Circuit Cellar collects four pages worth of info about companies that provide embedded security products, tools and services.

TECHNOLOGY FEATURES

Using Power Audio Amplifiers in Untypical Ways (Part 1): Best Building Blocks
Petre Petrov shows readers how to use PAAs as universal building blocks to create analog signal generators, analog power supplies, voltage splitters and more.

Data Acquisition Advances Focus on Interfacing
Jeff Child discusses the latest data acquisition solutions, with a look at how interface technologies have evolved.

Future of IoT Communications: Will Upgraded Cellular Networks Benefit IoT?
This guest essay by Andrew Girson, CEO of Barr Group, explores how IoT will fare in the 5G network era.

MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS:

Block Diagram Reduction and Automatic Tuning
George Novacek steps through how to think in terms of block diagrams to help you reduce system complexity early on in a design.

Numeric Precision vs. DDS Calculations
Using the full frequency resolution of a DDS chip outstrips the capabilities of floating point numbers. Ed Nisley looks at high-res frequency calibration and measurements in the DDS realm.

Deadbolt the Uninvited: Locked Out of My Home
In this Part 2 of Jeff Bachiochi’s electronic lock story, he gets into some of the power and remote-control issues of his electronic deadbolt lock project.

Diagnosing Performance Variations in HPC
Ayse K. Coskun delves into how application performance variations can cause inefficiency
in high-performance computing (HPC) systems and how to diagnose these variations.

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: IoT Technology Focus

In tommorrow’s IoT Technology Focus newsletter you’ll get news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.LoRa-NNNCo-PR-graphic-press

Bonus: We’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “IoT Technology Focus” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules—Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor —that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

…and…

August has a 5th Tuesday. So look for a bonus Newsletter this  month!

Don’t Miss Our Newsletter: Microcontroller Watch

In tommorrow’s Microcontroller Watch we’ll feature key updates on the latest microcontroller technology  — the latest MCU design wins — new MCU product announcements — MCU industry events –and more.35352057604_77bb4aab93_m

Plus: we’ve added Drawings for Free Stuff to our weekly newsletters. Make sure you’ve subscribed to the newsletter so you can participate.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “Microcontroller Watch” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules—Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor —that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

…and…

August has a 5th Tuesday. So look for a bonus Newsletter this  month!

Don’t Miss Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power Newsletter

Analog & Power is where stuff gets real. Converting signals to and from analog is how embedded devices interact with the real world. And without power supplies and power conversion, electronic systems can’t do anything. Circuit Cellar’s Analog & Power MFG_IB048E096T40N1-00themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow.

This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries and more.

               Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “Analog & Power” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules—Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor —that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Crowd Funded Arduino Board Measures 0.5. x 0.5 Inches

Crowd funded via Crowd Supply, a project called µduino is an Arduino measuring in at 12mm (0.5 inches) x 12mm. While similarly sized micro-controller boards do exist, their power is severely limited to using chips such as the Attiny85 (with up to 6 I/O ports). The µduino makes use of the power of the ATMEGA32U4 chip found in the Arduino Leonardo (a board over 20 times larger), offering 20 I/O ports, including PWM and ADC ports. In addition, the µduino can be powered by batteries or directly by micro-USB. The µduino can also operate in one of two power modes, 3.3V or 5V, which can be selected using a jumper on the board. This way, users can tailor µduino to match their sensors and power supplies.

microduino-10_jpg_project-body

The prototype measures 14mm (0.55 inches) square, and the final design measures just 12mm (0.47 inches) square. Unlike many other Arduino-based boards, the µduino uses smaller hole separation (1.27mm vs 2.54mm). While vastly cutting down on size, standard sized wires are still compatible and can be soldered fairly easily.

Crowd Supply | www.crowdsupply.com/uduino

RISC-V and Moore’s Law : An Interview with Krste Asanovic

During his busy sabbatical, Krste Asanovic took time to share his thoughts on developments n the world of processors and the open sourcing of processor architecture.

Moore’s Law and the Chip Industry’s Perfect Storm

By Wisse Hettinga

With the end of Moore’s Law in sight and a silicon manufacturing world that is struggling to protect their investments, the RISC-V foundation is throwing its nets out on the other side of the boat. How? By creating an opensource platform for future new silicon development.

“There is a lot of friction in the market,” Asanovic explains. Being a professor at Berkeley University in Computer Architecture, he knows what he is talking about. “With RISC-V we want to reduce this friction in the industry. One of the problems is the IP protection and business involvement in the industry. With SiFive you don’t have to deal with complicated contracts. Users can just come and take the material that’s all published and open source and use it in their future chip design.”

Lead Opening Image

Krste Asanovic is a SiFive founder and Professor of Computer Architecture at Berkeley University.

“The Barcelona Computer Centre is showing great interest in what we are doing with RISC-V. And the UPC computer architecture department is one of the strongest architecture group in Europe. Here—and also in the rest of Europe—there is a lot of interest in RISC-V for research projects and also for possible industrial use,” says Asanovic.

HETTINGA: Can you explain what RISC-V is?

ASANOVIC: RISC-V is an instruction set architecture (ISA). An ISA is what you use to encode software to run on hardware. In the industry there are common standards like the x86 from Intel and AMD. There’s also the ARM architecture we all know from our mobile phones and tablets. RISC-V uses different encoding which is meant to be free and open so that everyone can use without paying license fee—which is unlike the existing proprietary standards. Our goal is to have an open standard anybody can use.

HETTINGA: And what’s the level of interest from the market today for RISC-V?

ASANOVIC: If you look at the market, the x86 architecture is dominant in desktops and servers. ARM is dominant in mobile phones and tablets—and it will probably remain so. But what is interesting is that there are always new markets coming along: IoT (Internet of Things) and automotive are big markets. At the high-end of the market we see storage controllers and machine learning accelerators. These are all new greenfield areas where people are looking at new chip designs. They don’t have a large legacy of software and they are open to a new instruction set—particularly ones that are free of all sorts of legal and financial strings and give them flexibility to bring new things into the controller architecture.

HETTINGA: Give us a little history of RISC and of RISC versus CISC.

ASANOVIC: The RISC architecture goes a long way back and it’s still alive. I trace the roots of RISC way back to Seymour Cray’s early machines—like the CDC 6600—from 1964. RISC machines are register rich and have a load/store architecture. They have a lot of general registers and all operations are between registers except for the memory operations. That style of machine has remained popular for over 50 years and has outlived Moore’s Law.

Meanwhile, CISC has also been around for some time. CISC was a product of the time before integrated silicon started replacing the vacuum tubes and magnetic core memory systems. It is interesting to see that over the last couple decades there has been very little new development in the CISC architecture arena. I think everyone will agree that if you start from scratch, CISC is not a great idea.

RISC-V follows the heritage of the earlier RISC processor designs developed at Berkeley University. “RISC-V” means it is the fifth generation. We started on the project in 2010 and we were tired of using commercial ISAs for research. They were sometimes too complicated for what we wanted to do, and with the IP entanglements it is very difficult to share that research with others.

As academics, we like to share our work with others. We realized we did not want to invest in proprietary architectures. Also, a lot of commercial products are not that good. There was a quality problem and we thought we could do a lot better.

The response was overwhelming and very quickly it was getting too big for Berkeley and we started the RISC-V foundation. The goal of the foundation is to maintain the RISC-V ISA standard and we have grown to over 60 companies—including the biggest names like Qualcomm, Samsung, Microsoft, Western Digital, IBM and Google.

HETTINGA: From there, how did RISC-V lead to the creation of the SiFive organization?

ASANOVIC: At Berkeley we’ve done a great deal of research into RISC architecture, involving teams and activities. They did implementations, ported the compilers and Linux and got other operating systems up and running. Having a ‘critical mass’ of graduate students working on this project allowed people from outside to pick it up and do real work with it. It started off as an idea to have a consultancy activity around RISC-V. The co-founders—Andrew Waterman and Yunsup Lee—soon realized the opportunity and that’s why I also decided to get involved as a founder.

HETTINGA: This seems to be a very significant time in the semiconductor industry. How would you characterize where we’re at today?

ASANOVIC: The semiconductor industry is in this perfect storm where we see that Moore’s Law is ending and that new technologies and developments are getting more and more expensive. There are fewer and fewer companies capable of pulling off a new design and making money out of it. At the same time there is a growth in demand for custom chips. Everybody is talking about the Internet of Things and all those devices will need a processor—and that cannot be the same processor for all solutions. There will be a growth in silicon products, but that growth will be in many fragmented markets. The old semiconductor business model—having one design and selling many millions of it— doesn’t work anymore. That has worked with the traditional computer and mobile phone markets, but the future will see perhaps hundreds of designs in lower volumes.

With SiFive we try to figure out how this works. The traditional users of the chips are now becoming the new manufacturers. Google. Microsoft, Amazon and a lot of other companies will design and make their own chips—not to sell to others, but to use them in their own products. It will allow them to add capabilities that are not available in standard off-the-shelf chips.

Our mission is to find out if we can help smaller companies and startups to do custom silicon design and invent new products with new capabilities. We believe there is a lot of untapped innovation there. But the problem is the barrier to enter custom silicon design is too high and those great ideas do not become a product. Solving that problem is the goal of SiFive.

Photo 1

SiFive’s RISC-V Arduino board makes it easy for small companies to get started with new designs.

HETTINGA: Tell us about SiFive’s RISC-V Arduino reference design board.

ASANOVIC: Our business model is to do quick developments of new chipsets and help the client to get into production at very low costs. To enable that, we made an Arduino board (at the time of the interview the new Arduino Cinque was introduced / WH) that runs very fast. And by putting it into the Arduino format a lot of small design companies will see it and can use it for new designs. The interesting thing about this product is that it will take the focus from the board to the chip level. Not only the board is open source but the chip design is too. That can open up completely new perspectives for makers, start-up companies and medium-sized businesses. All the design files of the chip are open source are on Github. This is unique in the semiconductor business. With SiFive we want to get rid of the friction in the industry. We don’t have a costly structure with NDAs and lawyers. A lower cost structure will also mean lower costs for our clients. You can come and take the designs as they are and use them.

SiFive | www.sifive.com

Don’t Miss Circuit Cellar’s Newsletter: Embedded Boards

Board-level embedded computers are a critical building block around which system developers can build all manor of intelligent systems. Circuit Cellar’s Embedded Boards themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow. COM Express mm

The focus here is on module types like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor modules that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up to production volumes.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “Embedded Boards” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

The Most Technical

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShotIt is truly a thrill and an honor for me to be joining the Circuit Cellar team as the magazine’s new Editor-in-Chief. And in this—my first editorial in my new role—I want to seize the opportunity to talk about Circuit Cellar. A lot of factors attracted me to this publication. But in a nutshell its position in the marketplace is compelling. It intersects with two converging trends happening in technology today.

First, there’s the phenomenon of the rich set of tools, chips, and information resources available today. They put more power into the hands of makers and electronics DIY experts than ever before. You’ve got hardware such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi. Open source software ranging from Linux to Eclipse make integrating and developing software easier than ever. And porting back and forth between open source software and commercial embedded software is no longer prohibitive now that commercial software vendors are in a “join them, not beat them” phase of their thinking. Easy access has even reached processors thanks to the emergence of RISC-V for example (click here for more). Meanwhile, powerful FPGA chips enable developers to use one chip where an entire board or box was previously required.

The second big trend is how system-level chip technologies—like SoC-style processors and the FPGAs I just mentioned—are enabling some of the most game-changing applications driving today’s markets: including commercial drones, driverless cars, Internet-of-Things (IoT), robotics, mobile devices and more. This means that exciting and interesting new markets are attracting not just big corporations looking for high volume play, but also small start-up vendors looking to find their own niche within those market areas. And there are a lot of compelling opportunities in those spaces. Ideas that start as small embedded systems projects can—and are—blossoming into lucrative new enterprises.

What’s so exciting is that Circuit Cellar readers are at the center of both those two trends. There’s a particular character this magazine has that separates it from other technology magazines. There are a variety of long-established publications that cover electronics and whose stated missions are to serve engineers. I’ve worked for some of them, and they all have their strengths. But you can tell just by looking at the features and columns of Circuit Cellar that we don’t hold back or curtail our stories when it comes to technical depth. We get right down to the bits and bytes and lines code. Our readers are engineers and academics who want to know not only the rich details of a microcontroller’s on-board peripherals, but also how other like-minded geeks applied that technology to their DIY or commercial project. They want to know if the DC-DC converter they are considering has a wide enough input voltage to serve their needs.

Another cool thing for me about Circuit Cellar is the magazine’s origin story. Back when I was in high school and in my early days studying Computer Science in college, Steve Ciarcia had a popular column called Circuit Cellar in BYTE magazine. I was a huge fan of BYTE. I would take my issue and bring it to a coffee shop and read it intently. (Mind you this was pre-Internet. Coffee shops didn’t have Wi-Fi.) What I appreciated most about BYTE was that it had far more technical depth than the likes of PC World and PC Computing. I felt like it was aimed at a person with a technical bent like myself. When Steve later went on to found this magazine—nearly 30 years ago—he gave it the Circuit Cellar name but he also maintained that unique level of technical depth that entices engineers.

With all that in mind, I plan to uphold the stature and legacy in the electronics industry that I and all of you have long admired about Circuit Cellar. We will work to continue being the Most Technical information resource for professional engineers, academics, and other electronics specialists world-wide. Meanwhile, you can look forward to expanded coverage of those exciting market-spaces I discussed earlier. Those new applications really exemplify how embedded computing technology is changing the world. Let’s have some fun.

Don’t Miss CC’s Newsletter: IoT Technology Watch

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow. The newsletter will update you on the latest news and trends including IoT gateways, IoT device security, IoT wireless connectivity and IoT cloud implementations.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “IoT Technology Focus” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules (e.g., Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor modules) that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

August Circuit Cellar: A Sneak Preview

The August (325) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is jammed packed with useful technical information and inspiring, intriguing embedded electronics design stories.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of August Circuit Cellar:

FUN WITH GUITAR AMPLIFIERS!

Digital Guitar Amplifier/ Effects Processor—Part 2
Brian Millier details the digital guitar amplifier/effects unit he built using two Teensy Arduino modules.

A Range of Power Supplies for Hollow-State Guitar Amplifiers
Richard Honeycutt compares several different power supplies used for hollow-state guitar amplifiers.

MICROCONTROLLERS & PROCESSORS!

Firmware Upgrade with the PIC32
Nick Sicalides delves into performing firmware upgrades using a bootloader on the Microchip PIC32

Getting Started with PSoC Microcontrollers (Part 2): Putting PSoC to Work
Nishant Mittal goes even deeper on the Cypress PSoC providing some useful design examples.

Moore’s Law and the Chip Industry’s Perfect Storm
In this Interview Q&A Krste Asanovic explains RISC-V and the open sourcing of processor architecture.

SECURITY & RELIABILITY & ENCRYPTION!

Power Analysis of a Software DES Encryption Routine
Columnist Colin O’Flynn examines how to break a software implementation of the DES security routine.

Reliability and Failure Prediction: A New Take
Craig Armenti and Dave Wiens discuss a better way to simulate PCB vibration and acceleration.

Preventing Unwanted Entry
Columnist Jeff Bachiochi takes us inside his exploration of electronic lock systems, getting down to the fine details.

Future of Embedded Security: Wi-Fi to the Danger Zone
This guest essay by Adam Cecchetti, CEO of Deja vu Security, explains how memory leaks in your embedded system could have life or death consequences.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS:

Automatic Control (Part 4) The Implementation
George Novacek describes the PID temperature controller he built for a meat smoker.

Fully Differential Amplifiers
Robert Lacoste sings the praises of fully differential amplifiers and presents a few designs using them.

Build an Embedded Systems Consulting Company (Part 5) Axiom Wrap-Up
Bob Japenga shares more insights on running a successful embedded design firm built to last.

Circuit Cellar Newsletters to Focus on Microcontrollers, IoT and More

Circuit Cellar’s ongoing mission is to provide important information to help you make smart choices with your engineering projects—from prototype to production. As part of that effort, we’re now offering themed newsletter content each week that focuses on critical areas of system development.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get the first “Microcontroller Watch” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

Not a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber?
Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, covering these four areas every month:

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

IoT Technology Focus. The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. This newsletter tackles news and trends about the products and technologies needed to build IoT implementations and devices.

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules (e.g., Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor modules) that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Expansion Connector Sample Kits Target Makers

Samtec has announced the release of four unique Expansion Connector Sample Kits for Makers. These new kits allow continued growth and stacking of the most popular electronics platforms using standard 0.100″ (2.54mm) centerline IDC cables, sockets and headers. Rapid prototyping of innovative projects using open-source electronic platforms typically requires basic connectors and cable assemblies.

Samtec RasberryPi3Kit

Samtec has developed Expansion Connector Sample Kits for four of the most popular platforms:

  • Arduino Uno R3 Expansion Connector Sample Kit
  • BeagleBone Black Expansion Connector Sample Kit
  • ARM mbed Application Board Expansion Connector Sample Kit
  • Raspberry Pi 3 Expansion Connector Sample Kit

Samtec | www.samtec.com