DIY Arduino-Based ECG System

Cornell University students Sean Hubber and Crystal Lu built an Arduino-based electrocardiography (ECG) system that enables them to view a heart’s waveform on a mini TV. The basic idea is straightforward: an Arduino Due converts a heartbeat waveform to an NTSC signal.

Here you can see the system in action. The top line (green) has a 1-s time base. The bottom line (yellow) has a 5-s time base. (Source: Hubber & Lu)

Here you can see the system in action. The top line (green) has a 1-s time base. The bottom line (yellow) has a 5-s
time base. (Source: Hubber & Lu)

In their article, “Hands-On Electrocardiography,” Hubber and Lu write:

We used the Arduino Due to convert the heartbeat waveform to an NTSC signal that could be used by a mini-TV. The Arduino Due continuously sampled the input provided by the voltage limiter at 240 sps. Similar to MATLAB, the vectorized signal was shifted left to make room at the end for the most recent sample. This provided a continuous real-time display of the incoming signal. Each frame outputted to the mini-TV contains two waveforms. One has a 1-s screen width and the other has a 5-s screen width. This enables the user to see a standard version (5 s) and a more zoomed in version (1 s). Each frame also contains an integer representing the program’s elapsed time. This code was produced by Cornell University professor Bruce Land.

As you can see in the nearby block diagram, Hubber and Lu’s ECG system comprises a circuit, an Arduino board, a TV display, MATLAB programming language, and a voltage limiter.

The system's block diagram (Circuit Cellar 289, 2014)

The system’s block diagram (Circuit Cellar 289, 2014)

The system’s main circuit is “separated into several stages to ensure that retrieving the signal would be user-safe and that sufficient amplification could be made to produce a readable ECG signal,” Hubber and Lu noted.

The first stage is the conditioning stage, which ensures user safety through DC isolation by initially connecting the dry electrode signals directly to capacitors and resistors. The capacitors help with DC isolation and provide a DC offset correction while the resistors limit the current passing through. This input-conditioning stage is followed by amplification and filtering that yields an output with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). After the circuit block, the signal is used by MATLAB and voltage limiter blocks. Directly after DC isolation, the signal is sent into a Texas Instruments INA116 differential amplifier and, with a 1-kΩ RG value, an initial gain of 51 is obtained. The INA116 has a low bias current, which permits the high-impedance signal source. The differential amplifier also utilizes a feedback loop, which prevents it from saturating.

Following the differentiation stage, the signal is passed through multiple filters and receives additional amplification. The first is a low-pass filter with an approximately 16-Hz cutoff frequency. This filter is primarily used to eliminate 60-Hz noise. The second filter is a high-pass filter with an approximately 0.5-Hz cutoff frequency. This filter is mostly used to eliminate DC offset. The total amplification at this stage is 10. Since the noise was significantly reduced and the SNR was large, this amplification produced a very strong and clear signal. With these stages done, the signal was then strong enough to be digitally analyzed. The signal could then travel to both the MATLAB and voltage limiter blocks.

Hubber and Lu’s article was published in Circuit Cellar 289, 2014. Get it now!

24-Channel Digital I/O Interface for Arduino & Compatibles

SCIDYNE Corp. recently expanded its product line by developing a digital I/O interface for Arduino hardware. The DIO24-ARD makes it easy to connect to solid-state I/O racks, switches, relays, LEDs, and many other commonly used peripheral devices. Target applications include industrial control systems, robotics, IoT, security, and education.Scidyne

The board provides 24 nonisolated I/O channels across three 8-bit ports. Each channel’s direction can be individually configured as either an Input or Output using standard SPI library functions. Outputs are capable of sinking 85 mA at 5 V. External devices attach by means of a 50 position ribbon-cable style header.

The DIO24-ARD features stack-through connectors with long-leads allowing systems to be built around multiple Arduino shields. It costs $38.

[Source: SCIDYNE Corp.]

Arduino-Based Lathe Tachometer

Want an electronic tachometer to display the RPM of a lathe or milling machine? If so, Elektor has the project for you.

The electronics tachometer design features an Arduino micro board and  a 0.96″ OLED display from Adafruit for instantaneous readout. The compact instrument also has a clock displaying the equipment running time.

Q&A with Arduino-Based Skube Codesigner

The Arduino-based Skube

The Arduino-based Skube

Andrew Spitz is a Copenhagen, Denmark-based sound designer, interaction designer, and programmer. Among his various innovative projects is the Arduino-based Skube music player, which is an innovative design that enables users to find and share music.

Spitz worked on the design with Andrew Nip, Ruben van der Vleuten, and Malthe Borch. Check out the video to see the Skube in action. On his blog SoundPlusDesign.com, Spitz writes: “It is a fully working prototype through the combination of using ArduinoMax/MSP and an XBee wireless network. We access the Last.fm API to populate the Skube with tracks and scrobble, and using their algorithms to find similar music when in Discover mode.”

Skube – A Last.fm & Spotify Radio from Andrew Nip on Vimeo.

The following is an abridged  version of an interview that appears in the December 2012 issue of audioXpress magazine, a sister publication of Circuit Cellar magazine..

SHANNON BECKER: Tell us a little about your background and where you live.

Andrew Spitz: I’m half French, half South African. I grew up in France, but my parents are South African so when I was 17, I moved to South Africa. Last year, I decided to go back to school, and I’m now based in Copenhagen, Denmark where I’m earning a master’s degree at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design (CID).

SHANNON: How did you become interested in sound design? Tell us about some of your initial projects.

Andrew: From the age of 16, I was a skydiving cameraman and I was obsessed with filming. So when it was time to do my undergraduate work, I decided to study film. I went to film school thinking that I would be doing cinematography, but I’m color blind and it turned out to be a bigger problem than I had hoped. At the same time, we had a lecturer in sound design named Jahn Beukes who was incredibly inspiring, and I discovered a passion for sound that has stayed with me.

Shannon: What do your interaction design studies at CIID entail? What do you plan to do with the additional education?

Andrew: CIID is focused on a user-centered approach to design, which involves finding intuitive solutions for products, software, and services using mostly technology as our medium. What this means in reality is that we spend a lot of time playing, hacking, prototyping, and basically building interactive things and experiences of some sort.

I’ve really committed to the shift from sound design to interaction design and it’s now my main focus. That said, I feel like I look at design from the lens of a sound designer as this is my background and what has formed me. Many designers around me are very visual, and I feel like my background gives me not only a different approach to the work but also enables me to see opportunities using sound as the catalyst for interactive experiences. Lots of my recent projects have been set in the intersection among technology, sound, and people.

SHANNON: You have worked as a sound effects recordist and editor, location recordist and sound designer for commercials, feature films, and documentaries. Tell us about some of these experiences?

ANDREW: I love all aspects of sound for different reasons. Because I do a lot of things and don’t focus on one, I end up having more of a general set of skills than going deep with one—this fits my personality very well. By doing different jobs within sound, I was able to have lots of different experiences, which I loved! nLocation recording enabled me to see really interesting things—from blowing up armored vehicles with rocket-propelled grenades (RPGs) to interviewing famous artists and presidents. And, documentaries enabled me to travel to amazing places such as Rwanda, Liberia, Mexico, and Nigeria. As a sound effects recordist on Jock of the Bushvelt, a 3-D animation, I recorded animals such as lions, baboons, and leopards in the South African bush. With Bakgat 2, I spent my time recording and editing rugby sounds to create a sound effects library. This time in my life has been a huge highlight, but I couldn’t see myself doing this forever. I love technology and design, which is why I made the move...

SHANNON: Where did the idea for Skube originate?

Andrew: Skube came out of the Tangible User Interface (TUI) class at CIID where we were tasked to rethink audio in the home context. So understanding how and where people share music was the jumping-off point for creating Skube.

We realized that as we move more toward a digital and online music listening experience, current portable music players are not adapted for this environment. Sharing mSkube Videousic in communal spaces is neither convenient nor easy, especially when we all have such different taste in music.

The result of our exploration was Skube. It is a music player that enables you to discover and share music and facilitates the decision process of picking tracks when in a communal setting.

audioXpress is an Elektor International Media publication.

Arduino USB Host Shield

The Arduino USB Host Shield allows you to connect a USB device to your Arduino board. The Arduino USB Host Shield is based on the MAX3421E, which is a USB peripheral/host controller containing the digital logic and analog circuitry necessary to implement a full-speed USB peripheral or a full-/low-speed host compliant to USB specification rev 2.0.ArduinoHostshield

The shield is TinkerKit compatible, which means you can quickly create projects by plugging TinkerKit modules onto the board. The following device classes are supported by the shield:

  • HID devices: keyboards, mice, joysticks, etc.
  • Game controllers: Sony PS3, Nintendo Wii, Xbox360
  • USB to serial converters: FTDI, PL-2303, ACM, as well as certain cell phones and GPS receivers
  • ADK-capable Android phones and tables
  • Digital cameras: Canon EOS, Powershot, Nikon DSLRs and P&S, as well as generic PTP
  • Mass storage devices: USB sticks, memory card readers, external hard drives, etc.
  • Bluetooth dongles

For information on using the shield with the Android OS, refer to Google’s ADK documentation. Arduino communicates with the MAX3421E using the SPI bus (through the ICSP header). This is on digital pins 10, 11, 12, and 13 on the Uno and pins 10, 50, 51, and 52 on the Mega. On both boards, pin 10 is used to select the MAX3421E.

[Source: Arduino website via Elektor]