Artisan’s Asylum

Artisan’s Asylum in Somerville, MA has the mission to promote and support the teaching, learning, and practicing of all varieties. Soumen Nandy is the Front Desk, General Volunteer, and Village Idiot of Artisan’s Asylum and she decided to tell us a little bit more about it.

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Photo courtesy of Artisan’s Asylum Facebook page

Location 10 Tyler St
Somerville, MA 02143
Members 400 active members
Website artisansasylum.com

Tell us about your meeting space!

We have around 40,000 sq. ft. that includes more than 150 studio spaces ranging from 50 sq. ft. to 200+ sq. ft. Our storage includes: lockers, 2 x 2 x 2 rack space, 40″ x 44″ pallets (up to 10′ tall), flexspace and studios. We have a truck-loading dock and a rail stop — yup, entire trains can pull up to our back doors for delivery. Can any other Maker Space say that? We also host a large roster of formal training courses in practical technologies, trades, crafts and arts, to help our members and the general community learn skills, and increase their awesomeness. (And not incidentally: become certified to safely use our gear.)

What are you working with?

Fully equipped wood, metal, machine, robotics, electronics, jewelry/glass shops, 12 sewing stations,  computer lab with all major professional modeling, CNC, and simulation packages (via direct partnerships with the respective companies). Multiple types of 3D printers, laser cutters, CNC routers, lathes, mills, etc. Too much more to list; if the Asylum doesn’t own/lease it, often a member, their business, or an institutional member can get it from you or get you access. And yet, it’s never enough.

Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

Quite a few things, but it’s a delicate balance between sustainable operations, growth and space for member studios vs. facilities. We’ve spun off or attracted many companies, so the empty factory complex we moved into (until recently the worlds largest envelope factory) has almost completely filled up.

Does your group work with embedded tech (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, MCU-based designs, etc.)?

Many of our members do. The group itself is too diverse to easily characterize.

What has your group been up to?

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Hanging with a giant robot. (Courtesy of https://www.facebook.com/ProjectHexapod)

We’re not purely a technological space. We have artists, artisans, tradespesons, crafters, hobbyists, and technologists. I know of at least two-million dollar Kickstarters that launched from here. Hmmm… How about the 18-foot wide rideable-hexapod robot that’s nearing conclusion (we call it “Stompy“) or the 4′ x 8′ large format laser cutter that should be operational any day now? These are just some notably big projects, not necessarily our most awesome.

Oh, wait. we did an Ides of March Festival, dressing up Union Square as a Roman Forum.

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

Well, a few weeks ago, I went home at 10 PM, and woke to a tweeted photo announcing that this had been built in our social area; It’s actually not among our most surprising events, but it has reappeared several times since (fast dis/assembly), and a reporter caught it once. I just happened to receive this link a couple of hours ago, so it was handy to forward to you. We do a lot of art and participation projects around Boston.

What does Artisan’s social calendar look like these days?

Too many events to list! We’re really looking to stabilize our base, seek congruent funding donors (we are a non-profit, but thus far have mostly run on internally-earned income). I’d be happy to arrange an interview with one of our honchos if you like—the goings-ons around here are really too much to fit in one brain. Those of us who give tours actually regularly take each other’s tours to learn stuff about the place we never knew.

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Keep getting awesomer. We love you!

Also, any philanthropists out there? Our members and facilities could be an excellent way to multiply your awesome impact.

Keep up with Artisan’s Asylum! Check out their website!

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet at a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

TinkerMill, where they share knowledge, lots of knowledge!

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TinkerMill is a Hacker/Makerspace from Longmont, CO. Where like-minded people get together and collaborate on anything art, technology, science, and business related.

Scott Converse is the founder of TinkerMill and tells us about the organization.

Location 1250 S. Hover #49, Longmont, CO 80501
Members 65
Website tinkermill.org

What’s your meeting space like? 

Our workshop is over 6,500 square feet and we also have an office space.

What tools do you have in your space? 

  • Electronics
  • PCB board design
  • Robotics
  • Soldering stations
  • Woodworking shop
  • Metalworking shop
  • Welding shop
  • Rapid Prototyping
  • Lab (CNC, Lastercutter, 3D Printers)
  • Brewery & Distillery
  • Jewelry
  • Datacenter
  • And many more…

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Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

Any PCB and pick/play stuff. Also some electronics supplies would be nice.

Does your group work with embedded tech like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, or MCU-based designs?

We work with Arduino and Raspberry Pi a lot. Embedded stuff comes along quite often. For example we also work with Nvidia’s Jetson TK1 board, oDroid boards, and Parallella boards.

What are some of the projects your group has been working on?

We just did the Denver Mini Maker Faire. We also built a Tesla coil and we have about a dozen of other projects, which you can all find on our website.

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

For our craziest project so far I must say it was the 15 foot human-powered Ferris wheel. This was a great project!

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Come on down and BUILD something with us!

Want to know more about TinkerMill? Make sure to check out their website!

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet at a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

HackRVA: They provide the tools, you provide the enthusiasm

HackRVA Sign4HackRVA is a Richmond-based makerspace. They like to take things apart, put them back together, figure out how they work, and create new things. Their mission? To learn and make stuff sharing tools and knowledge in technology; including Arduino, Makerbot, Linux, and the Open Source movement.

Aaron Nipper will tell us a little more.

Location 1600 Roseneath Road, Suite E, Richmond, VA 23230
Members 65
Website www.hackrva.org

What’s your meeting space like? 

Our space is about 2,000 square feet. We have an AV and general meeting area, a tech lab, and a fab lab.

What’s in your “toolbox”?

  • Two 3D printers
  • Laser cutter
  • Lots of soldering stations
  • O-scopes
  • Hand and power tools
  • A computer lab

Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

A CNC Router — like a shopbot. Can’t wait to build that first wiki-house!

Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security… which embedded technologies does your group work with most frequently? 

We use all that stuff. Arduino, R-Pi, whatever we can get our hands on! We’ve designed, from scratch, PCB Badges for RichSec security conference the last three years. Click here to learn more about the PCB Badges project.

What have you been working on lately?

For the past three years, we’ve designed those PCB badges for the RichSec security conference. Here’s another recent build where a member took a Power Wheels and made it Xbox controller driven. Check out the video below or click here to read more about that project.

Do you have any events or initiatives you’d like to tell us about? Where can we learn more about them?

You can learn more about us at hackrva.org. We host the Richmond Maker Guild, have regular Saturday Hackathons, as well as a Noise Night. Members are always coming up with creative events!

Any words of advice for fellow hackers?

My personal motto is fail often, teach others, and post to the web. All those things help me learn and think about projects better.

Want to know more about what HackRVA does? Check out their Facebook page and website.

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

Denhac — Hackerspace meets classroom for technology, art, and engineering

Denhac is a hackerspace on a mission to create and sustain a local, community driven, shared space, that enables education, experimentation, and collaboration, by applying the spirit of DIY to science, technology, engineering, and art.

Location 975 E 58th Ave, Unit N Denver, CO 80216
Members 45
Website Denhac.org

Alpha One Labs

What’s your meeting space like? 

It’s about 2,500 sq. ft. of commercial/warehouse/workshop space. We have an open shop floor area, bay doors, a classroom, an air-conditioned server room, and floorspace for several workstations specializing in various DIY areas.

What tools do you have in your space? 

  • Small OpenStack driven data center (four 72″ racks)
  • Cisco Networking workstation (for learning network engineering and infosec activities)
  • Textile workstation (sewing machines and USB driven embroidery machine) used for costuming, cosplay creation, etc.
  • 3D Printer workstation with Lulzbot printer
  • SeeMeCNC large format printer
  • Electronics workstation with oscilloscopes, breadboards, components, testing equipment, etc.
  • Soldering station
  • Small tools workstation (grinders, dremels, etc.),
  • Large format printer workstation,
  • Lasercutter (100watt),
  • Internet radio station (www.denhacradio.org) with a group going for a Low Power FM license (for running a community radio station)
  • Lots of racks for servers
  • 100 MB Internet

Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

A metal forge, welding gear, carpentry gear, and CNC Tools.

Does your group work with embedded tech like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, or MCU-based designs?

Yes, we teach classes on all of these (and more).

What are some of the projects your group has been working on?

Many and few, lots of individual projects. The group focuses more on collecting great tools for it’s members, and teaching classes on a broad range of topics (from making costumes, to hacking Arduino’s, to synthetic biology DNA hacking with bioblocks).

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

9′ Tesla coil. Also, a Steampunk flamethrower.

You mentioned a Low Power FM group earlier, can you tell us more about it? Are there other events or initiatives you’d like to talk about?

Yes, we’re just starting up a Low Power FM (LPFM) group that will be applying for a license to set up and run an FM community radio station at Denhac. We started a weekly Kids Coding Dojo class that teaches kids from ages six to fifteen how to code. (Accompanied by their parents.) We have a software defined radio hacking group (Radio Heads) that uses programs like GNUradio with SDR-capable radio kits and dongles to ‘listen in’ on the world. A BIG antenna is needed for that! We have a LockSport group that meets monthly and has some expert lock pickers. We have a 3D and LaserCutter printer group that meets as needed to teach members and the public how to use the equipment and to trade ideas on what to make next.

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Come and visit! We love visitors.

Want to know more about Denhac? Make sure to check out their website!

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

Newcastle Makerspace’s first rule? Do not be on fire.

1069828_219774724881137_1206270128_nIn Newcastle upon Tyne, located in North-East England, lies Newcastle Makerspace. This is an eclectic group of makers, creatives, programmers, scientists, and engineers. They’ve set up a space to meet, work, socialize, share ideas and collaborate.

Gregory Fenton is a member and wants to tell us a little bit more about what they’re working on.

Location 18 New Bridge Street West, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8AW, England
Members Lots and growing fast.

CW: Tell us about your meeting space.

We have 2 large rooms, one for relaxing, holding meetings and talks etc., and one for working on projects. We also have a fully networked computer room with spare monitors and keyboards for people who bring in their Raspberry Pi. Another room is dedicated to our lathe and laser cutter. There’s a kitchen area so people can prepare meals and make drinks and a well-organized storage rack.

CW: What sort of tools do you have at Makerspace Newcastle? 

  • Oscilloscopes
  • Soldering stations (including SMD soldering using heat)
  • Two 3D printers (both working and being built by members)
  • A lathe
  • A laser cutter (ordered, just waiting on delivery)
  • Computers
  • Bench drills and saws
  • Circular saws, sanders, grinders, and lots of general hand and power tools

CW: What’s on your wish list? 

A laser CNC and newer tables and chairs would be nice additions.

CW: What sort of embedded tech does your group work with? 

We use lots of embedded technology such as Arduinos, BeagleBoards, Raspberry Pis, PICs, etc… for various projects.

CW:  What are some projects that your group has been working on?

We have so much going on, projects that come to fruition and projects just being imagined that I could go on for ever!

  • One of our members is building a large quadcopter from scratch with a 3D camera mounted underneath it.
  • Another is working on a candy machine that feeds the Makers whenever someone tweets to it (give it a try by sending a tweet containing the word candy to @maker_space).
  • Several of our members are building 3D printers of various styles and sizes.
  • One of our members designs costumes for shows, circuses and events.
  • A different member is taking his children’s old baby clothes and making a quilted “memory blanket,” as well as creating wooden toys to give to them now they are a little older.
  • Some of our junior members are learning about programming, interfacing to electronics and relays, and making toys by hand from balsa wood.
  • One of our members is creating a power extension that is controlled remotely using Arduinos, servo motors and a GSM shield to switch on and off individual plugs via text message (SMS).
  • A project that’s being done as a group is a Raspberry Pi media server that plays music and controls other devices such as an amplifier, lights and LED strips. I don’t think this project will ever truly be finished as every completed task leads to “wouldn’t it be cool if we did …”.

 

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What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

Easy. We decided we wanted a laser cutter, went on a members pledge drive and had the money to buy it outright within a week! It is in China at the moment but soon we’ll be cutting out plexiglass and wood like there is no tomorrow!

Do you have any events or initiatives you’d like to tell us about? Where can we learn more about it?

We regularly hold events both in the space itself and in other places in the surrounding area. Check our blog and mailing list from our website for upcoming and past events.

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

  • Always follow rule zero: Do not be on fire.
  • Safety is everyone’s responsibility.
  • Don’t have a space local to you? find a few like minded individuals and set up your own! You can start small (a garage or shed) and expand as time passes and membership increases.
  • If a project interests you, tell the world. Circuit Cellar, Blog, Facebook, Twitter… Spread the word.

Want to know more about what Makerspace Newcastle does? Check out their Facebook and Twitter page!

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet at a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

Makelab Charleston, a place for hobbyists and professionals

Makelab Charleston is a hackerspace for hobbyist and professionals who share common interests in technology, computers, science, or digital/electronics art. It provides an environment for people to create anything they can imagine: from electronics, 3D printing, and construction, to networking, and programming.

Location 3955 Christopher St, North Charleston, SC 29405
Members 24

Treasurer David Vandermolen will tell us something more about Makelab Charleston.

MakeLabCharleston

Tell us about your meeting space!

We started in a 500 sq. ft. garage, but took a step up and are currently renting a 900+ sq. ft. home that’s been renovated.  We now have the space for a electronic/soldering room that also has our 3-D printer. One other room is dedicated to power-type tools and our CNC machine that is still being built by our members.  The other spaces in the house are used for classes and member activities such as LAN parties.

What tools do you have in your space? (Soldering stations? Oscilloscopes? 3-D printers?)

Soldering stations, oscilloscopes, 3-D printer, power tools, large table-top CNC machine (in progress), and a rack server for the IT minded to play with.

Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

A laser CNC, nice tables, and chairs .

Does your group work with embedded tech (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, MCU-based designs, etc.)?

We have members that dabble in multiple areas so we try to provide classes on the technology people want to learn about and explore.

Can you tell us about some of your group’s recent tech projects?

Our most recent tech project has been a overhaul of our server system. Other projects include the CNC currently in progress. That’s been an ongoing project for about a year.

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

Probably the wackiest project we completed was actually, something not tech related at all, building a bed for Charleston Bed Races. We put together a Lego bed (not real Legos) complete with Lego man and all.

Do you have any events or initiatives you’d like to tell us about? Where can we learn more about it?

We list any events or classes we are doing or plan on doing on our Website. Just click on classes and events on the main page or go to the calendar tab.

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

Makelab Charleston is about opening the world to information and sharing that information with the people in our community. The best way to do that is through teaching.

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

The Transistor: Something for Every DIY-er

The Transistor is a UT-based hackerspace. Its members have a love for all things open source and DIY. They enjoy working with embedded electronics and have created their own version of Arduino.

Orem

Location 1187 S 1480 W Orem, UT 84058
Members 55

Salt Lake City

Location 440 S 700 E
Unit #102, Salt Lake City, UT 84102
Members 18

The Transistor Hackerspace

Founder Deven Fore tells us about The Transistor:

ROBBERT: Tell us about your meeting space!

DEVEN: We currently have two locations. One in Salt Lake City, UT and one in Orem, UT.

Our Salt Lake City location is about 1,000 sq ft in a nice office building. We have one main area and two smaller rooms.

Our Orem location is about 5,700 sq ft in a large warehouse that also has offices. We have sectioned off a wood shop, a metal shop, a clean CNC, an assembly area, a members desks area, a lounge, a server room, an electronics room, and a few other dedicated areas.

ROBBERT: What tools do you have in your space? (Soldering stations? Oscilloscopes? 3-D printers?)

DEVEN: Too many things to list. All the general things you would expect, such as:

  • Soldering irons
  • Oscilloscopes
  • Analyzers
  • PCB work stations
  • Laser cutter
  • Vinyl cutter
  • Heat press
  • Chop saws
  • Mini lathe
  • Servers
  • Air tools
  • Cut-off saws
  • Mig welder
  • V90 FireBall router
  • A couple small miscellaneous CNC routers
  • 3-D printers
  • Networking gear

ROBBERT: Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

DEVEN: We would love to have a large mill (CNC or manual) some day. Also, just all-around upgrades to current equipment.

ROBBERT: Does your group work with embedded tech (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, MCU-based designs, etc.)?

DEVEN: All the time.

ROBBERT: Can you tell us about some of your group’s recent tech projects?

DEVEN: Currently we are working on miniature MAME cabinets. They are two player and will hold up to a 22″ LCD. We will release the CNC plans to the public as soon as we are done.

We’re working on a lot of miscellaneous projects: software, hardware, security, and so forth.

We’re also currently working on building some displays for The Living Planet Aquarium, in Sandy UT.

ROBBERT: What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

DEVEN: Nothing too crazy. We built a drink cooler a year or so ago for the Red Bull Challenge. We designed and build a few full-size four-player MAME cabinets (planned for release to the public on our website, and featured in J. Baichtal’s Hack This: 24 Incredible Hackerspace Projects from the DIY Movement (Que Publishing, 2011).

4-player MAME cabinet

4-player MAME cabinet

ROBBERT: Do you have any events or initiatives you’d like to tell us about? Where can we learn more about it?

DEVEN: Lots of things are going on right now. Nothing specific, aside from working with the aquarium. We have a lot of public events/user groups that meet at our space. Our calender is on our website if you are interested in specifics.

ROBBERT: What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

DEVEN: Have fun, be productive, be safe.

Want to learn more about The Transistor? Check out their Facebook or MeetUp page!

Check out their calender to see what The Transistor is up to.

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!

Ace Monster Toys – 3D Printing, DIY Book Scanners and “Dirty Shops”

Ace Monster Toys is a Hackerspace in the East San Francisco Bay Area dedicated to education, hacking, and maker culture since September 2010. They are a membership based group with regular free open-to-the-public classes and events. They are open to anyone and non-members are welcome.

Location 6050 Lowell Street, Oakland, CA
Members 55
Website AceMonsterToys.org

Ace Monster Toys Hackerspace

Here’s what Ace Monster Toys member David has to say about his group:
Tell us about your meeting space!

Our space is 1600 sq ft, divided among three rooms, one upstairs and two downstairs. The upstairs is the “less dirty” area, with desks for working on projects, space for meetings and classes, electronics work area, and 3D printers. Downstairs is the “dirty shop,” in which one room is mostly woodworking tools with a large CNC mill and the other room contains the laser cutter and some storage. We have many shelves where members can put their projects in boxes as well as a few small storage lockers, both upstairs and downstairs.

What tools do you have in your space? (Soldering stations? Oscilloscopes? 3-D printers?)

Everything and the kitchen sink it seems like! Downstairs is a giant 80W laser cutter, a giant CNC router table (both capable of taking full sheets of plywood or other woods), a mini desktop CNC router, several different woodworking tools (bandsaw, chop saw, radial arm saw, table saw, router table, jointer, wood lathe, various power hand tools), a metal bandsaw, a micro metal lathe, a drill press, and a Zcorp powder based 3D printer. Upstairs we have several textile machines (serger, sewing machines), oscilloscopes, logic analyzers, soldering stations, three plastic FDM type 3D printers, a DIY book scanner, a large format inkjet printer, and a roomba or three.

Are there any tools your group really wants or needs?

A more reliable 3D printer would be pretty nice. Also a CNC mill capable of working metal would be really cool and would allow us to fabricate metal parts. A decent tabletop or larger metal lathe would expand our fabrication abilities. For textiles: Supplies for conductive sewing projects/classes… lilipad everything, conductive fabric, thread, battery packs, batteries. Not just for the classes themselves but also for prototyping projects.

Does your group work with embedded tech (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, embedded security, MCU-based designs, etc.)?

Yes! We have lots of Arduino and Raspberry Pi fans, but of course we have people who work with other microcontrollers as well (ARM based mostly I’d say).

Can you tell us about some of your group’s recent tech projects?

One group project we built was a laser shooting gallery — targets had light sensors and were attached to servo motors, would pop up, and then you had to shoot them with a laser pointer gun. There were sound effects and a score display. You can read more details about it here: wiki.acemonstertoys.org/Shooting_Gallery and there are some videos here: popmechnow.com/radioshack (on the left side) One of our members has been working on using a small desktop CNC router to make custom circuit boards. It uses a neat hack to probe the level of the bed to create more accurate cuts. The results have been pretty good. There’s lots of details about this project here: wiki.acemonstertoys.org/Milling_Circuit_Boards

Another cool and not too complex project is 3D scanning our members and then printing out the models on our 3D printer. We use an inexpensive xbox kinect to do the scanning, along with the free version of the software Skanect, and then we load that model into our Makergear Mosaic 3D printer and spit them out. Here’s a picture of two of our members in plastic model format:

3D Scans of Ace Monster Toys' members

What’s the craziest project your group or group members have completed?

Craziest? It’s hard to say, lots of crazy stuff comes out of this place. One impressive project is our Book Scanner, made from plywood, random hardware store nuts and bolts, and a bike brake cable which triggers the shutters on two cameras to photograph two pages at once. It’s gotten a lot of press, the inventor even gave a TED Talk about it. He made his own website for it, you can find more details here: www.diybookscanner.org

Do you have any events or initiatives you’d like to tell us about? Where can we learn more about it?

Our current biggest initiative is moving to a bigger space. We would like to double our square footage and offer more facilities & capabilities including accessibility. For events which are going on, many of them weekly, check out the calendar on our website or on meetup.acemonstertoys.org.

What would you like to say to fellow hackers out there?

“Collaboration and connection has done more to further my knowledge and to produce better, more creative art and projects and innovative ideas than any other factor. Be fearless. Ask questions, try it. Don’t be afraid to cut, or solder or try even when it seems hard or complicated. Everybody starts somewhere.” ~ Crafty Rachel

Check out Ace Monster Toys’ pages on Instructables and Facebook!

You can read all about their projects on their wiki page.

Show us your hackerspace! Tell us about your group! Where does your group design, hack, create, program, debug, and innovate? Do you work in a 20′ × 20′ space in an old warehouse? Do you share a small space in a university lab? Do you meet at a local coffee shop or bar? What sort of electronics projects do you work on? Submit your hackerspace and we might feature you on our website!