Inside This Issue: May #286

Circuit Cellar is a monthly magazine (available in print and digital) covering the topics of embedded hardware, embedded software, electrical engineering, and computer applications. You can browse a free preview or subscribe here. You can also purchase this issue from our webshop.

Here’s what’s contained inside this month’s issue of Circuit Cellar magazine:

Circuit Cellar May #286

Circuit Cellar May #286

     CC COMMUNITY

08 : CC WORLD

10 : QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
Embedded Systems Consultant
By Nan Price
Elecia White on wearable electronics in health care, device connectivity, women in engineering, and more

     INDUSTRY & ENTERPRISE

16 : PRODUCT NEWS

20 : CLIENT PROFILE
Lemos International Technology Co., Inc. (Barrington, RI)

     FEATURES

22 : Remote-Control Powered Trapdoor Lift
By William Wachsmann
Build an MCU-based lift system with off-the-shelf electrical components and IDE programming

30 : A Coding Interface for an Evaluation Tool
By John Peck
This customizable ASCII interface sends commands and receives data

38 : Eco-Friendly Home Automation Controller
by Manual Iglesias Abbatermarco
Control household devices and upload temperature, energy use, and other sensor data to the cloud

     COLUMNS

46 : GREEN COMPUTING
Data Centers in the Smart Grid
By Alyse K. Coskun
Learn how data centers can participate in smart-grid programs that regulate power use

50 : THE CONSUMMATE ENGINEER
Wireless Data Links (Part 3)
By George Novacek
Explore low-power data receivers, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and data bit recovery

58 : ABOVE THE GROUND PLANE
Battery Capacity and Aging
By Ed Nisley
Testing and analyzing old and new batteries in a four-year collection produces surprising results

66 : FROM THE BENCH
Passive RFID Tagging (Part 1): Read-Only Tags
By Jeff Bachiochio
An overview of passive RFID tags, transponder circuitry, and tag readers

     TESTS & CHALLENGES

74 : CROSSWORD

75 : TEST YOUR EQ

     TECH THE FUTURE

80 : The Future of Monolithically Integrated LED Arrays
By Vincent Lee
Fabricating millions of LEDs on a single chip promises brighter micro-displays on wearable see-through glasses, vivid embedded cell phone projectors, and more