CC264: Plan, Construct, and Secure

Circuit Cellar July 2012 features innovative ideas for embedded design projects, handy design tips with real-world examples, and essential information on embedded design planning and security. A particularly interesting topic covered in this issue is the microcontroller-based home control systems (HCS). Interest in building and HCSes never wanes. In fact, articles about such projects have appeared in this magazine since 1988.

Circuit Cellar 264 (July 2012) is now available.

Turn to page 18 for the first HCS-related article. John Breitenbach details how he built an Internet-enabled, cloud-based attic monitoring system. Turn to page 36 for another HCS article. Tommy Tyler explains how to build a handy MCU-based digital thermometer. You can construct a similar system for your home, or you can apply what you learn to a variety of other temperature-sensing applications. Are you currently working on a home automation design or industrial control system? Check out Richard Wotiz’s “EtherCAT Orchestra” (p. 52). He describes an innovative industrial control network built around seven embedded controllers.

John Breitenbach's DIY leak-monitoring system

The wiring diagram for Tommy Tyler's MCU-based digital thermometer

The rest of the articles in the issue cover essential electrical engineering concepts and design techniques. Engineers of every skill level will find the information immediately applicable to the projects on their workbenches.

Tom Struzik’s article on USB is a good introduction to the technology, and it details how to effectively customize an I/O and data transfer solution (p. 28). On page 44, Patrick Schaumont introduces the topic of electronic signatures and then details how to use them to sign firmware updates. George Novacek provides a project development road map for professionals and novices alike (p. 58). Flip to page 62 for George Martin’s insight on switch debouncing and interfacing to a simple device. On page 68, Jeff Bachiochi tackles the concepts of wireless data delivery and time stamping.

Jeff Bachiochi's hand-wired modules

I encourage you to read the interview with Boston University professor Ayse Kivilcim Coskun on page 26. Her research on 3-D stacked systems has gained notoriety in academia, and it could change the way electrical engineers and chip manufacturers think about energy efficiency for years to come. If you’re an engineer fascinated by “green computing,” you’ll find Coskun’s work particularly intriguing.

Special note: The Circuit Cellar staff dedicates this issue to Richard Alan Wotiz who passed away on May 30, 2012. We appreciate having had the opportunity to publish articles about his inventive projects and innovative engineering ideas and solutions. We extend our condolences to his family and friends.

Circuit Cellar Issue 264 (July 2012) is now available on newsstands. Go to Circuit Cellar Digital and then select “Free Preview” to take a look at the first several pages.

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