One Electronics Workspace Among Nuremberg’s Thousands

Living in and around the international technology hub of Nuremberg, Germary, are tens of thousands of professional electrical engineers, tech-focused academics, and electronics DIYers. According to the city’s website, the IT sector—comprising radio technologies, embedded systems, and software development—has more than 100,000 employees working in more than 7,000 companies.

Heiner Tucher's bright, sufficiently powered electronics workspace

Within this burgeoning city and metro area are innovative circuit cellars, hack spaces, and workspaces of all sorts. Let’s take a look Heiner Tucher’s space.

With a general interest in electronics, Tucher built the space to serve as his “personal hobby room.” He works with older parts, and builds some of them himself. The tube-based generator is still full functional, he said.

If you look closely, you’ll see Tucher smartly equipped his workbench with a few essentials that every serious electronics designer should consider for his or her space:

  • Sufficient power: It’s no secret that easily accessible, wall-mounted power strips make designers’ lives much easier. Tucher has a great power supply setup.
  • Smart Storage: The process of designing and programming an electronic system comes with plenty of obstacles and bugs. So why create more headaches for yourself by cluttering your space or mixing random parts in unlabelled boxes and drawers? A storage system doesn’t have to be expensive or elaborate. Tucher made good use of what look like basic cabinets with decent depth. Nice and simple, yet extremely useful.
  • Proper lighting: Check out the overhead lamp Tucher placed suffificently above the main work bench. Notice how you don’t see any shadows from his various pieces of equipment. That’s essential when working with small components.

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