A Workspace Where Meccano Meets Arduino

Peeking into someone’s workspace gives you a glimpse of their interests, personality, and aspirations. Thus, in the same way no two personalities are exactly same, no two workspaces are identical. Some workspaces are retreat-like locations where designers spend their precious “alone time”; other spaces are 24/7 where innovators work, play, eat, and even sleep. Some spaces are intended for leisurely designing, learning, programming, and tinkering. Other spaces are high-pressure work zones where electronics innovators endeavor around the clock to create the systems and programs that pay their bills. And so it’s due to the personal nature of each workspace that we’re grateful to the generous innovators who’ve pulled back the curtains to give us a look.

Today let’s check out a space that’s intended more for innovation and learning than building the next money-making embedded system.

Ralph Laughton’s multifunctional London-based workspace was designed for model-making and Meccano-building. It wasn’t intended to be an electrical engineering workspace.

But Circuit Cellar and Elektor members shouldn’t overlook a space simply because it isn’t full of MCUs, soldering irons, PCBs, and EE test equipment. You can learn a lot by studying someone’s work area: innovative storage systems, novel workbench designs, handy power supply solutions, equipment customization, and more.

Laughton's bench in London

Laughton wrote the following with his submission:

Please find attached a photograph of my modest workspace here in my workshop in London, England. My space has to be shared with other activities such as model making as in this picture. Component storage and larger equipment is stored to one side of the bench, keeping the main area clear. The shelves across the window are mounted on adjustable brackets. Not only does this give flexibility, but it enables easy access to the window and blind for cleaning and maintenance.

On his blog he writes:

My workshop has to accommodate woodworking, model making, photography as well as anything else that needs fixing, modifying or investigating.

When comes to investigating, Laughton has begun learning about Arduino. In late April he posted the following about his early experiences with it:

I am now at the stage where I can make it do what it is supposed to do and I have even written and modified my own lump of code. This may not seem like much to some of you reading this but for me this is a big leap into the world of digital electronics and microprocessors—something I didn’t think I would ever entertain. Mind you, what do I know? I used to think digital photography would never catch on.

So, with Arduino and the recent purchase of a scope (see his May 2 post), Laughton is positioning himself to take on more electronics projects in his multifuctional workspace

We can’t wait to see what sorts of Arduino-controlled Meccano projects he creates.

Do you want to share photos of your personal electronics workspace, hackspace, or “circuit cellar”? Do you have an article or tutorial you’d Circuit Cellar to consider for publication? Click here to submit your proposal or write-up and photos. Write “Submission” or “Proposal” in the subject line of your email.

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