Voice Coil Parts & Production

Voice coils are essential elements in loudspeakers of all sorts. Thus, understanding how a voice coil works is essential for audio engineers and DIYers alike. The main parts the bobbin, the voice coil wire, and the collar. Mike Klasco and Steve Tatarunis of Menlo Scientific provide in-depth information about voice coils in the March 2012 issue of audioXpress magazine.

The parts of a voice coil (Source: Precision Econowind)

Klaso and Tatarunis write:

“The bobbin provides a rigid structure on which the voice coil wire can be wound and the collar can serve several purposes. It secures the coil lead-out wires, reinforces the bobbin, and provides a convenient material for diaphragm attachment … In some cases—headphone speakers, for example—a monolithic (self supporting no bobbin or collar) voice coil may be used. But this article will focus on the more commonly used bobbin, coil, and collar designs.

Loudspeaker voice coils are seldom considered critical elements that contribute to sound quality, and few technical papers have addressed this issue. But when designing a voice coil, the selection and application of materials can have profound effects upon sound quantity, quality, and power handling. The mechanical energy from the winding stack moves by transconduction through the bobbin and collar before reaching the diaphragm. Any non-linearities in this path are superimposed upon the response of the speaker. Intrinsic characteristics of materials such as internal damping and Young’s modulus create specific sonic signatures and contribute to the residual distortion spectrum of the transducer … In selecting a particular material, a coil winder makes important trade-offs on the winding process. Knowledge of these variables can ensure better, more cost-effective coils, avoid conflicts, and improve production yields. Torsional resonances, internal losses, and electrical conductivity of the bobbin materials are some of the factors effecting the distortion, sensitivity, and sound quality of the finished loudspeaker.”

A close-up view of both a good voice coil and a burned voice coil (Source: The Speaker Exchange)

You can read the entire article here. For subscription information, go to www.audioamateur.com.

audioXpress magazine, like Circuit Cellar, is an Elektor group publication.

 

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