Organic Magnetism & Electronic Applications

Innovative researchers in Japan are looking closely at organic magnetism and how it can be applied to electronic systems. Could carbon-based organic materials eventually replace inorganic materials (i.e., silicon and other metals) in future electronic applications?

In a post titled “Organic Electronics: The Secret of Organic Magnets Unlocked” at TechTheFuture.com, Tessel Renzenbrink explains the results of exciting research by Japanese scientists studying the origin of magnetism in organic compounds. Tessel writes:

Organic light- emitting diodes (OLEDs) are already commercially in use in displays of mobile devices and significant progress has been made in applying organic photovoltaic cells to a light-weight flexible fabric to generate low-cost solar energy. But an entirely new range of applications is possible such as disposable biodegradable RFID tags and biomedical implants.

One of the limiting factors of organic materials is that they rarely exhibit magnetic properties because their atomic structure is fundamentally different from metals. But for electronic applications such as data storage and electric motors magnetism is essential.

Now a team of scientists from the RIKEN research center has established an exact theoretical model which could aid materials scientists to develop organic magnetic materials.

You can read the entire post at TechTheFuture.com.

TechTheFuture.com is part of the Elektor group. 

 

 

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