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Issue 284: EQ Answers

PROBLEM 1
Can you name all of the signals in the original 25-pin RS-232 connector?

ANSWER 1
Pins 9, 10, 11, 18, and 25 are unassigned/reserved. The rest are:

Pin Abbreviation Source Description
1 PG - Protective ground
2 TD DTE Transmitted data
3 RD DCE Received data
4 RTS DTE Request to send
5 CTS DCE Clear to send
6 DSR DCE Data Set Ready
7 SG - Signal ground
8 CD DCE Carrier detect
12 SCD DCE Secondary carrier detect
13 SCTS DCE Secondary clear to send
14 STD DTE Secondary transmitted data
15 TC DCE Transmitter clock
16 SRD DCE Secondary received data
17 RC DCE Receiver clock
19 SRTS DTE Secondary request to send
20 DTR DTE Data terminal ready
21 SQ DCE Signal quality
22 RI DCE Ring indicator
23 - DTE Data rate selector
24 ETC DTE External transmitter clock

 

PROBLEM 2
What is the key difference between a Moore state machine and a Mealy state machine?

ANSWER 2
The key difference between Moore and Mealy is that in a Moore state machine, the outputs depend only on the current state, while in a Mealy state machine, the outputs can also be affected directly by the inputs.

 

PROBLEM 3
What are some practical reasons you might choose one state machine over the other?

ANSWER 3
In practice, the difference between Moore and Mealy in most situations is not very important. However, when you’re trying to optimize the design in certain ways, it sometimes is.

Generally speaking, a Mealy machine can have fewer state variables than the corresponding Moore machine, which will save physical resources on a chip. This can be important in low-power designs.

On the other hand, a Moore machine will typically have shorter logic paths between flip-flops (total combinatorial gate delays), which will enable it to run at a higher clock speed than the corresponding Mealy machine.

 

PROBLEM 4
What is the key feature that distinguishes a DSP from any other general-purpose CPU?

ANSWER 4
Usually, the key distinguishing feature of a DSP when compared with a general-purpose CPU is that the DSP can execute certain signal-processing operations with few, if any, CPU cycles wasted on instructions that do not compute results.

One of the most basic operations in many key DSP algorithms is the MAC (multiply-accumulate) operation, which is the fundamental step used in matrix dot and cross products, FIR and IIR filters, and fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). A DSP will typically have a register and/or memory organization and a data path that enables it to do at least 64 MAC operations (and often many more) on unique data pairs in a row without any clocks wasted on loop overhead or data movement. General-purpose CPUs do not generally have enough registers to accomplish this without using additional instructions to move data between registers and memory.

Electrical Engineering Crossword (Issue 285)

The answers to Circuit Cellar’s April electronics engineering crossword puzzle are now available.

285-crossword-keyAcross

2.    STOKESSHIFT—Can reduce photon energy [two words]
8.    HYSTERESISLOOP—Its area measures the energy dispersed during a magnetization cycle [two words]
11.    NANDGATE—A shoe in when playing “true or false?” [two words]
13.    YOCTOPROJECT—An open-source alliance designed to help Linux aficionados [two words]
15.    RANKINE—°R
17.    INTERNALNET—A network that resides in and around you
18.    SEQUENTIALCIRCUIT—Dependent on past input [two words]
19.    NANOHENRY—Its abbreviation is the same as the state bordered by Massachusetts, Maine, and Vermont
20.    BINARYCODEDDECIMAL—Makes good use of a 4- or 8-bit nibble [three words]

Down

1.    BIREFRINGENCE—Divides light into ordinary and extraordinary rays
3.    SQUIRREL—An object-oriented programming language
4.    SMARTMETER—Records and shares energy usage information [two words]
5.    MESHANALYSIS—A circuit evaluation method [two words]
6.    LYOTFILTER—Uses [1. Down] to produce a narrow frequency range of wavelengths [two words]
7.    LINEARREGULATOR—Keeps things steady [two words]
9.    BRAGGDIFFRACTION—Occurs when electromagnetic radiation disperses [two words]
10.    AUTODYNE—An amplifying vacuum tube-based circuit
12.    FEMTOWATT—10–15 W
14.    UNIJUCTION—Can be used to measure magnetic flux
16.    PEAKER—Increases gain at higher frequencies

Triangulation, Trilateration, or Multilateration? (EE Tip #125)

Local Positioning System (LPS) and GPS (not just the US system) both use several transmitters to enable a receiver to calculate its geographical position. Several techniques are possible, each with its advantages and drawbacks. The important thing in all these techniques is the notion of a direct path (line of sight, or LoS). In effect, if the transmitter signal has not taken the shortest path to the receiver, the distance between them calculated by the receiver will be incorrect, since the receiver does not know the route taken by the radio signal.

Three mathematical techniques are usually used for calculating the position of a receiver from signals received from several transmitters: triangulation, trilateration, and multilateration. The last two are very similar, but should not be confused.

Triangulation

Triangulation (Figure 1) is a very ancient technique, said to date from over 2,500 years ago, when it was used by the Greek philosopher and astronomer Thales of Miletus to measure (with surprising accuracy) the radius of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun.

Triangulation

Figure 1—Triangulation: you are at A, from where you can see B and C. If you know their geographical positions, you can find your own position with the help of a compass.

It allows an observer to calculate their position by measuring two directions towards two reference points. Since the positions of the reference points are known, it is hence possible to construct a triangle where one of the sides and two of the angles are known, with the observer at the third point. This information is enough to defi ne the triangle completely and hence deduce the position of the observer.

Using triangulation with transmitters requires the angle of incidence (angle of arrival, or AoA) of a radio signal to be measured. This can be done using several antennas placed side by side (an array of antennas, for example, Figure 2) and to measure the phase difference between the signals received by the antennas.

Antenna array

Figure 2—An antenna array makes it possible to measure the angle of incidence of a radio signal, and hence its direction.

If the distance between the antennas is small, the incident front of the signal may be considered as straight, and the calculation of the angle will be fairly accurate. It’s also possible to use a directional antenna to determine the position of a transmitter. The antenna orientation producing the strongest signal indicates the direction of the transmitter. All you then have to do is take two measurements from known transmitters in order to be able to apply triangulation.

Trilateration

This technique requires the distance between the receiver and transmitter to be measured. This can be done using a Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI), or else from the time of arrival (ToA)—or time of flight (ToF) Figure 3—of the signal, provided that the receiver and transmitter are synchronized — for example, by means of a common timebase, as in GPS.

Arrival time

Figure 3—The length of the arrows corresponds to the arrival time at receiver P of the signals broadcast by three transmitters A, B, and C. It forms a measurement of the distances between the transmitters and the receiver.

Thus, when receiving a signal from a single transmitter, we can situate ourselves on a circle (for simplicity, let’s confi ne ourselves to two dimensions and ideal transmission conditions) with the transmitter at the center. Not very accurate. It gets better with two transmitters — now there are only two positions possible: the two points where the circles around the two transmitters intersect. Adding a third transmitter enables us to eliminate one of these two possibilities (Figure 4).

Trilateration

Figure 4—2-D trilateration. In 3-D, another transmitter has to be added in order to determine a position unambiguously.

When we extend trilateration to three dimensions, the circles become spheres. Now we need to add one more transmitter in order to fi nd the position of the receiver, as the intersection of two spheres is no longer at two points, but is a circle (assuming we ignore the trivial point when they touch). This explains why a GPS needs to “see” at least four satellites to work.

Multilateration

Using a single receiver listening to the signals (pulses, for example) from two synchronized transmitters, it is possible to measure the difference between the arrival times (time difference of arrival, or TDoA) of the two signals at the receiver. Then the principle is similar to trilateration, except that we no longer fi nd ourselves on a circle or a sphere, but on a hyperbola (2D) or a hyperboloid (3D). Here too, we need four transmitters to enable the receiver to calculate its position accurately.

The advantage of multilateration is that the receiver doesn’t need to know at what instant the signals were transmitted—hence the receiver doesn’t need to be synchronized with the transmitters. The signals, and hence the electronics, can be kept simple. The LORAN and DECCA systems, for example, work like this.—Clemens Valens, “Geolocalization without GPS,” Elektor, February 2011.

Internet of Things Challenge: WIZ55io Modules Moved Fast

As soon as the WIZNet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge launched on March 3, 2014, Internet of Things (IoT) innovators—from professional electrical engineers to creative electronics DIYers—around world began requesting free WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller modules. And due to the popular demand for the modules, the supply of free units ran out on March 11.

Although free modules are no longer available, anyone with a WIZ550io Ethernet module, or W5500 chip, may participate in the competition.

Participants can purchase eligible parts at shopwiznet.com or shop.wiznet.eu.

The WIZ550io is an auto-configurable Ethernet controller module that includes the W5500 (TCP/IP-hard-wired chip and PHY embedded), transformer, and an RJ-45 connector. The module has a unique, embedded real MAC address and auto network configuration capability.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

The W5500 chip is a Hardwired TCP/IP embedded Ethernet controller that enables Internet connection for embedded systems using Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI).

W5500

W5500

The challenge is straightforward. Participants must implement a WIZ550io Ethernet module, or W5500 chip, in an innovative electronics design for a chance to win a share of $15,000 in prizes. The project submission deadline is August 3, 2014. For more information about the challenge, visit http://circuitcellar.com/wiznet2014/.

Sponsor: WIZnet

A Fundamental Rule of Grounding (EE Tip #124)

Quantum mechanics notwithstanding, our world is analog. And so despite our fascination with everything digital, we need interfaces to provide bridges for our analog reality to cross over to the digital paradigm and then back again. One may ask: Is there a common denominator that binds these two worlds together regardless of their many conceptual differences? In my mind, it is grounding.

The fundamental rule for grounding is depicted in Figure 1. By “ground” I mean the common 0 V potential to which signals are referenced. The “chassis ground”, if grounding conductors had 0 Ω impedance, would also be 0 V—but, unfortunately, it never is. Yet there are still systems that are sufficiently insensitive to ground potential differences. They use the chassis for the signal and power returns. At one time, this was the way cars had been wired.

Figure 1: Botth sections, A and B, may be on the same PCB with separate ground planes (e.g., analog and digital). The diodes and the capacitor between the planes limit potential differences due to ground bounce, etc. Broken lines inside boxes 1 and 3 indicate ground referenced, non-symmetrical inputs and outputs.

Figure 1: Botth sections, A and B, may be on the same PCB with separate ground planes (e.g., analog and digital). The diodes and the capacitor between the planes
limit potential differences due to ground bounce, etc. Broken lines inside boxes 1 and 3 indicate ground referenced, non-symmetrical inputs and outputs.

Figure 1a shows circuits sharing a common ground run. Notice that the output or the highest current drawing stage (1) must be the closest to the common point to minimize the voltage developed by that stage current over the grounding conductor. Also notice that the input signal and its return must be tied to the input block (3). Internal signal returns (grounds) are shown by broken lines. Returning inputs or outputs anywhere else would superimpose the noise from stages 1, 2, and 3 on the input signal. Figure 1b shows the approach often used in RF equipment. There is no sharing of grounds; they are all individually tied to a single point. Each circuit A and B can occupy its own PCB or they can be on a single PCB, their ground planes separate, such as analog and digital circuits. The grounds come together at the point G, where the chassis is also connected. Where there are a few inches of wire tying the individual grounds together, it is a good idea to insert fast signal diodes and a capacitor as shown between the separate ground runs. Any potential difference developed between the separate grounds due to finite impedance of wiring, as shown in Figure 1, will be attenuated and clamped by the three components. Note that the “capacitor” should in fact be a parallel combination of a number of capacitors, depending on the application, to guarantee performance across the spectrum. The following are typically used: 100 pF, 1 nF, 10 nF, 0.1 μF, and 1 μF.

In safety-critical systems such as aircraft comprising two or more subsystems enclosed in metal cabinets, such as shown in Figure 2, only currents from lightning or other interference suppressed by the EMC blocks is allowed to be returned to the chassis.

Figure 2: Connecting subsystems to avoid ground loops

Figure 2: Connecting subsystems to avoid ground loops

Power needs to be delivered by twisted pairs and all the returns connected to the chassis at a single point. If the signal grounds of the electronics are not allowed to be connected to the chassis, which depends on the system architecture, a combination of diodes, a capacitor, and a resistor as shown needs to be used to prevent ground loops as well as parasitic feedbacks between the electronics and the metal cabinet.

The subsystem enclosures shown with dotted lines connect to the chassis by mounting screws or straps. Most of today’s avionic equipment uses isolated power supplies. There is no galvanic connection between the power return and the internal signal ground to eliminate ground loops, yet the enclosures need to be connected to the internal grounds to eliminate parasitic feedbacks through capacitive coupling; but then they would create ground loops. Some system architectures require signals working with their own ground, isolated from the chassis, to prevent ground loops. To compensate for the parasitic capacitances existing due to the proximity of the metal enclosure to the components and the EMI/lightning protection, the resistor, capacitor, diode combination (as mentioned above) is used, with typical values of resistor about 10 kΩ and capacitance less than 10 μF. The capacitance is again a parallel combination of smaller capacitors to suppress the desired frequency spectrum.—George Novacek, “My Analog World: The Significance of Grounding,” Circuit Cellar 244, 2010.