About Circuit Cellar Staff

Circuit Cellar's editorial team comprises professional engineers, technical editors, and digital media specialists. You can reach the Editorial Department at editorial@circuitcellar.com, @circuitcellar, and facebook.com/circuitcellar

IoT Innovation: Show Off Your W5500 Project (Sponsored Post)

The WIZnet Connect the Magic Challenge offers you a variety of opportunities to show off your engineering skills and present your Internet of Things (IoT) designs to the world. It’s your shot to win a share of $15,000 in prizes, gain international recognition as innovator, and more.

Elektor/Circuit Cellar is the challenge administrator for the WIZnet Connect the Magic 2014 Design Challenge

Elektor/Circuit Cellar is the challenge administrator

Don’t delay! The submission deadline is ​August​ 3, 2014. All Entries must be received on or before 12:00 PM EDT on ​August 3​, 201​4​.

To Enter, simply upload your Entry via the Entry Dropbox.

OTHER OPPORTUNITIES
Didn’t finish your project? You can still participate.

If the deadline approaches and your entry is not complete, we still encourage you to submit your project or submit a project after the deadline. While only these on-time files are submitted to the judges, consider that there are many more opportunities for contest success, such as Elektor/Circuit Cellar’s “Distinctive Excellence” awards.

While Elektor/Circuit Cellar must follow the Sponsor’s rules about submission and judging when it comes to the contest’s official prizes, Elektor/Circuit Cellar is able to include its own award program that takes into account design skills that may otherwise go unrecognized.

By submitting even an unfinished project by the deadline for official judging, you qualify for a Distinctive Excellence review. If there is merit and the project warrants further consideration, those projects that may be offered a Distinctive Excellence award may be updated by the entrant after the contest deadline.

Historically, there have been some really fascinating Distinctive Excellence projects for previous Elektor/Circuit Cellar design contests. Those who win this designation see their projects posted online similar to the official winners and enjoy much of the same exposure. Many are offered separate print magazine publishing deals through Elektor/Circuit Cellar. The benefits of having Elektor/Circuit Cellar recognize and publicize your work in a high profile campaign like this should not be underestimated.\

Plus … Due to Elektor and Circuit Cellar’s international reach, you’ll get even more exposure than ever before! Imagine getting a Distinctive Excellence award—or getting your article published—and being recognized by readers throughout the world! That could lead any number of positive outcomes. Job opportunities? Design deals? The sky is the limit!

THE CHALLENGE

You are challenged to design and build an innovative project that uses least one WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or W5500 chip. You can use any other MCU and/or module along with the WIZ550io Ethernet module.

W5500

W5500

WIZnet PARTS

Your project must use at least one WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or WIZnet W5500 chip. You can use any other MCU and other module along with the WIZ550io Ethernet module or W5500 chip. Visit the Eligible Parts page for more information.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE

Participation is simple. First, read the Rules. Second, build and thoroughly document a project featuring a WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet Controller module or W5500 chip. Next, Register for the Challenge and obtain a Project Registration Number. Lastly, Submit a complete project Entry.

JUDGING 

The goal of the Challenge is to showcase the functionality of the WIZnet WIZ550io module. All Challenge entries will be judged by a panel of judges on the following: technical merit 30%, originality 30%, usefulness 20%, cost-effectiveness 10%, and design optimization 10%. It would be smart to highlight these achievements in your documentation. Call attention to your project’s special features.

RN4020 Bluetooth Smart Module

Microchip Technology recently announced its first Bluetooth 4.1 Low Energy module, the RN4020, which carries both worldwide regulatory certifications and is Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) certified. The integrated Bluetooth Low Energy (BTLE) stack and on-board support for the common SIG low-energy profiles speeds time to market while ensuring Bluetooth compatibility, eliminating expensive certification costs and reducing development risks. The module comes preloaded with the Microchip Low-energy Data Profile (MLDP), which enables designers to easily stream any type of data across the BTLE link. MicrochipRN4020

The RN4020 is a stack-on-board module, so it can connect to any microcontroller with a UART interface, including hundreds of PIC MCUs, or it can operate standalone without an MCU for basic data collection and communication, such as a beacon or sensor. Standalone operation is facilitated by Microchip’s unique no-compile scripting, which allows module configuration via a simple ASCII command interface—no tools or compiling are required.

The RN4020 Bluetooth Low Energy Module is available for $6.78 each in 1,000-unit quantities.

[Via Microchip Technology]

WIZnet Challenge Entry Tips (Sponsored Post)

The WIZnet Connect the Magic Challenge deadline is ​August​ 3, 2014. Let’s go over the challenge and cover some tips for entering.WIZnetconnect_logo_horweb_550x

What is the Challenge?

You are challenged to design and build an innovative project that uses least one WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or W5500 chip. You can use any other MCU and/or module along with the WIZ550io Ethernet module.

What devices must I use with my project?
Your project must use at least one WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet controller module or WIZnet W5500 chip. You can use any other MCU and other module along with the WIZ550io Ethernet module or W5500 chip. Visit the Eligible Parts page for more information.

WIZnet's WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

WIZnet’s WIZ550io auto configurable Ethernet controller module includes a W5500, transformer, & RJ-45.

How do I participate?

Participation is simple. First, read the Rules. Second, build and thoroughly document a project featuring a WIZnet WIZ550io Ethernet Controller module or W5500 chip. Next, Register for the Challenge and obtain a Project Registration Number. Lastly, Submit a complete project Entry.

​​May I submit multiple entries?
Yes. You may submit as many entries as you want. Each Entry must have its own Project Registration Number. Complete a Project Registration Form for each Entry you intend to submit.
What types of projects win design contests?
The goal of the Challenge is to showcase the functionality of the WIZnet WIZ550io module. All Challenge entries will be judged by a panel of judges on the following: technical merit 30%, originality 30%, usefulness 20%, cost-effectiveness 10%, and design optimization 10%. It would be smart to highlight these achievements in your documentation. Call attention to your project’s special features.

New JANSR+ 100krad Transistors for Radiative Environments

STMicroelectronics recently announced it is bringing into the JANS system the innovation released last year within the European Space Components Coordination (ESCC) program. Called JANSR+, the innovation consists of a series of 100krad JANSR high-dose-rate bipolar transistors with an additional 100krad low-dose-rate (100 mrad/s) test performed on each wafer.rad_hard_bipolar_trans

Furthermore, ST has announced it will complete its JANSR+ offer with data from very-low-dose-rate (10 mrad/s) tests, demonstrating the outstanding robustness to radiation effect of its technology.

As a result, ST’s JANSR+ series gives access to products with superior performance in radiative environments, with complete test data to support the claim. These products can be used without any up-screen cost and lead time, thus dramatically raising the bar in the industry.

All parts are housed in advanced hermetic UB packages and are available in sample and volume quantities.

[Via STMicroelectronics]

Q&A with Arduino-Based Skube Codesigner

The Arduino-based Skube

The Arduino-based Skube

Andrew Spitz is a Copenhagen, Denmark-based sound designer, interaction designer, and programmer. Among his various innovative projects is the Arduino-based Skube music player, which is an innovative design that enables users to find and share music.

Spitz worked on the design with Andrew Nip, Ruben van der Vleuten, and Malthe Borch. Check out the video to see the Skube in action. On his blog SoundPlusDesign.com, Spitz writes: “It is a fully working prototype through the combination of using ArduinoMax/MSP and an XBee wireless network. We access the Last.fm API to populate the Skube with tracks and scrobble, and using their algorithms to find similar music when in Discover mode.”

Skube – A Last.fm & Spotify Radio from Andrew Nip on Vimeo.

The following is an abridged  version of an interview that appears in the December 2012 issue of audioXpress magazine, a sister publication of Circuit Cellar magazine..

SHANNON BECKER: Tell us a little about your background and where you live.

Andrew Spitz: I’m half French, half South African. I grew up in France, but my parents are South African so when I was 17, I moved to South Africa. Last year, I decided to go back to school, and I’m now based in Copenhagen, Denmark where I’m earning a master’s degree at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design (CID).

SHANNON: How did you become interested in sound design? Tell us about some of your initial projects.

Andrew: From the age of 16, I was a skydiving cameraman and I was obsessed with filming. So when it was time to do my undergraduate work, I decided to study film. I went to film school thinking that I would be doing cinematography, but I’m color blind and it turned out to be a bigger problem than I had hoped. At the same time, we had a lecturer in sound design named Jahn Beukes who was incredibly inspiring, and I discovered a passion for sound that has stayed with me.

Shannon: What do your interaction design studies at CIID entail? What do you plan to do with the additional education?

Andrew: CIID is focused on a user-centered approach to design, which involves finding intuitive solutions for products, software, and services using mostly technology as our medium. What this means in reality is that we spend a lot of time playing, hacking, prototyping, and basically building interactive things and experiences of some sort.

I’ve really committed to the shift from sound design to interaction design and it’s now my main focus. That said, I feel like I look at design from the lens of a sound designer as this is my background and what has formed me. Many designers around me are very visual, and I feel like my background gives me not only a different approach to the work but also enables me to see opportunities using sound as the catalyst for interactive experiences. Lots of my recent projects have been set in the intersection among technology, sound, and people.

SHANNON: You have worked as a sound effects recordist and editor, location recordist and sound designer for commercials, feature films, and documentaries. Tell us about some of these experiences?

ANDREW: I love all aspects of sound for different reasons. Because I do a lot of things and don’t focus on one, I end up having more of a general set of skills than going deep with one—this fits my personality very well. By doing different jobs within sound, I was able to have lots of different experiences, which I loved! nLocation recording enabled me to see really interesting things—from blowing up armored vehicles with rocket-propelled grenades (RPGs) to interviewing famous artists and presidents. And, documentaries enabled me to travel to amazing places such as Rwanda, Liberia, Mexico, and Nigeria. As a sound effects recordist on Jock of the Bushvelt, a 3-D animation, I recorded animals such as lions, baboons, and leopards in the South African bush. With Bakgat 2, I spent my time recording and editing rugby sounds to create a sound effects library. This time in my life has been a huge highlight, but I couldn’t see myself doing this forever. I love technology and design, which is why I made the move...

SHANNON: Where did the idea for Skube originate?

Andrew: Skube came out of the Tangible User Interface (TUI) class at CIID where we were tasked to rethink audio in the home context. So understanding how and where people share music was the jumping-off point for creating Skube.

We realized that as we move more toward a digital and online music listening experience, current portable music players are not adapted for this environment. Sharing mSkube Videousic in communal spaces is neither convenient nor easy, especially when we all have such different taste in music.

The result of our exploration was Skube. It is a music player that enables you to discover and share music and facilitates the decision process of picking tracks when in a communal setting.

audioXpress is an Elektor International Media publication.