About Circuit Cellar Staff

Circuit Cellar's editorial team comprises professional engineers, technical editors, and digital media specialists. You can reach the Editorial Department at editorial@circuitcellar.com, @circuitcellar, and facebook.com/circuitcellar

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The Most Technical

Input Voltage

–Jeff Child, Editor-in-Chief

JeffHeadShotIt is truly a thrill and an honor for me to be joining the Circuit Cellar team as the magazine’s new Editor-in-Chief. And in this—my first editorial in my new role—I want to seize the opportunity to talk about Circuit Cellar. A lot of factors attracted me to this publication. But in a nutshell its position in the marketplace is compelling. It intersects with two converging trends happening in technology today.

First, there’s the phenomenon of the rich set of tools, chips, and information resources available today. They put more power into the hands of makers and electronics DIY experts than ever before. You’ve got hardware such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi. Open source software ranging from Linux to Eclipse make integrating and developing software easier than ever. And porting back and forth between open source software and commercial embedded software is no longer prohibitive now that commercial software vendors are in a “join them, not beat them” phase of their thinking. Easy access has even reached processors thanks to the emergence of RISC-V for example (see p.39 in August issue). Meanwhile, powerful FPGA chips enable developers to use one chip where an entire board or box was previously required.

The second big trend is how system-level chip technologies—like SoC-style processors and the FPGAs I just mentioned—are enabling some of the most game-changing applications driving today’s markets: including commercial drones, driverless cars, Internet-of-Things (IoT), robotics, mobile devices and more. This means that exciting and interesting new markets are attracting not just big corporations looking for high volume play, but also small start-up vendors looking to find their own niche within those market areas. And there are a lot of compelling opportunities in those spaces. Ideas that start as small embedded systems projects can—and are—blossoming into lucrative new enterprises.

What’s so exciting is that Circuit Cellar readers are at the center of both those two trends. There’s a particular character this magazine has that separates it from other technology magazines. There are a variety of long-established publications that cover electronics and whose stated missions are to serve engineers. I’ve worked for some of them, and they all have their strengths. But you can tell just by looking at the features and columns of Circuit Cellar that we don’t hold back or curtail our stories when it comes to technical depth. We get right down to the bits and bytes and lines code. Our readers are engineers and academics who want to know not only the rich details of a microcontroller’s on-board peripherals, but also how other like-minded geeks applied that technology to their DIY or commercial project. They want to know if the DC-DC converter they are considering has a wide enough input voltage to serve their needs.

Another cool thing for me about Circuit Cellar is the magazine’s origin story. Back when I was in high school and in my early days studying Computer Science in college, Steve Ciarcia had a popular column called Circuit Cellar in BYTE magazine. I was a huge fan of BYTE. I would take my issue and bring it to a coffee shop and read it intently. (Mind you this was pre-Internet. Coffee shops didn’t have Wi-Fi.) What I appreciated most about BYTE was that it had far more technical depth than the likes of PC World and PC Computing. I felt like it was aimed at a person with a technical bent like myself. When Steve later went on to found this magazine—nearly 30 years ago—he gave it the Circuit Cellar name but he also maintained that unique level of technical depth that entices engineers.

With all that in mind, I plan to uphold the stature and legacy in the electronics industry that I and all of you have long admired about Circuit Cellar. We will work to continue being the Most Technical information resource for professional engineers, academics, and other electronics specialists world-wide. Meanwhile, you can look forward to expanded coverage of those exciting market-spaces I discussed earlier. Those new applications really exemplify how embedded computing technology is changing the world. Let’s have some fun.

Bluetooth SIG Adds Mesh Networking to BLE Ecosystem

The Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) announced that the wireless connectivity global standard now supports mesh networking. This enables many-to-many (m:m) device communications and is optimized for creating large-scale device networks, ideally suited for building automation, sensor networks and smart home solutions where tens, hundreds, or thousands of devices need to reliably and securely communicate with one another.

According to the Bluetooth SIG, Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) enables short-burst wireless connections and supports multiple network topologies, now including a mesh topology for establishing many-to-many (m:m) device communications. This is an important evolution for Bluetooth technology, and one of the most anticipated features envisaged by the Bluetooth SIG promoters, anticipating Bluetooth 5 practical implementations.

With this update the typical point-to-point, star-based network topology evolves directly to a true mesh networking topology, paving the way for a wide range of applications that span from personal area network solutions all the way to an expanded range of connected devices, theoretically without physical limits.

One of the main benefits will be precisely in the area where until now only standard 802.11 Wi-Fi solutions were available, which is the smart home and smart buildings. With the combination of Bluetooth 5 and mesh networking technology, manufacturers will be able to surpass worries about coverage range, without compromising on the low-power requirements that are mandatory in battery operated devices. This enables the creation of “blanket” Bluetooth networking coverage, with devices connecting between themselves without the need for a central router. This allows effectively the creation of autonomous Bluetooth Wireless Local Area Networks, allowing devices to communicate locally. For example, sensors will be able to send messages to main devices, allowing the music to start playing in the living room, as soon as the user moves out of the room.

As the Bluetooth SIG highlights, mesh networking doesn’t require any special controllers or hub equipment, there is no single point of failure, and any Bluetooth control device will be able to remote control any point of the network. All this, with assured interoperability and without complexity, allowing users to acquire and add devices from any vendor that adopted the standard.

The potential of mesh networking also allows more complex commercial and industrial scenarios. Bluetooth mesh is optimized for creating large-scale device networks and is ideally suited for building automation, sensor network, asset tracking solutions. New control and automation systems, from lighting to heating/cooling to security, wireless sensor networks (WSN) for industrial applications, are some obvious candidates for  Bluetooth mesh networking technology.

Capable of supporting broadcast topology, Bluetooth LE became an attractive alternative for asset tracking over active RFID. The addition of mesh networking lifs Bluetooth LE range limitations and establishes the adoption of Bluetooth asset tracking solutions for use in larger and more complex building environments.

20170719164724_BluetoothMesh03Web

A unique full-stack approach that defines the low-level radio up to the high-level application layer, ensuring all aspects of the technology are fully specified for the updated specification. Comprehensive, multi-vendor interoperability testing is conducted during the specification development process, not after specification release, and Bluetooth SIG members can benefit of all the qualification tools and processes needed to ensure global, multi-vendor interoperability.

The Bluetooth mesh specification is now available to all members, allowing manufacturers to start prototyping products. The Bluetooth mesh networking specifications, as well as the tools required to qualify Bluetooth products with mesh networking support, are now available at the Bluetooth website. Bluetooth mesh networking operates on Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) and is compatible with core specification version 4.0 and higher.

Bluetooth SIG | www.bluetooth.com

Triple-Output Power Supplies Feature Modern Interfaces

Keysight Technologies has announced the introduction of the E36300 Series triple-output programmable DC power supplies. With a large color display, intuitive user interface, modern device connections via LAN (LXI, USB and optional GPIB), the E36300 matches the performance of more expensive system power supplies. The E36300 Series’ low “normal mode” noise specifications assure quality power for precision circuitry applications, enabling engineers to power their designs with confidence. In addition, the power supplies are acoustically quiet. Each model provides excellent line/load regulation of 0.01 percent, fast transient response time of less than 50 ms, low-range current measurement, and over-voltage, over-current and over-temperature protection to prevent damage to the device under test.

Keysight Technologies-E36300

Keysight’s BenchVue software supports the E36300 Series, enabling control of power supplies to set parameters and status alerts, visualize power output, and log changing voltage and current over time. The included Test Flow capabilities let users quickly automate power-supply setups and measurements into test sequences. The E36300 Series is available to order now. The list price starts at $1,100.

Keysight Technologies | www.keysight.com

Tiny Module Combines LTE Cat M1 and Cat NB1 for IoT Applications

u-blox has announced the SARA-R410M-02B, a configurable LTE Cat M1/NB1 multi-mode module with worldwide coverage. According to u-blox, it is the industry’s smallest module available in the market today to offer both LTE Cat M1 and Cat NB1 in a single hardware package. Measuring just 16 mm x 26 mm, the until provides software-based configurability for all deployed bands. The SARA-R410M-02B multi-mode global module supports ultra-low power consumption and cost-optimized solutions making it ideal for the development of LPWA IoT applications.

uBlox SARA-R410M

SARA-R410M-02B lets IoT system developers use a single hardware version globally. This provides enormous efficiencies in logistics and SKU management. Developers can easily respond to changes in business or market conditions, since supported frequencies and operator configuration decisions can now be made at “zero hour” or even later in the field. The flexibility extends further with the ability to select modes dynamically between Cat M1and Cat NB1 as either single or preferred connection.

Critical firmware updates can be delivered with u‑blox proprietary uFOTA (firmware over the air) client/server solution that uses LWM2M, a light and compact protocol that is ideal for IoT applications. This enables customers to continue using the same hardware for future enhancements to features, functionalities or operator certifications, making it well‑suited for crucial applications running on devices that may be deployed in the field over long periods of time.

Another benefit of SARA‑R410M‑02B is the hardware readiness for future support of voice functionality via VoLTE over Cat M1, which can be used for applications requiring a level of human interaction, as is the case for security applications such as alarm panels.  Thanks to u‑blox nested design, migration to SARA‑R4 Series from other u‑blox 2G, 3G and 4G modules is made easy.

Low Power Consumption and Extended range

SARA‑R410M‑02B provides an extended temperature range of -40 to +85°C, and supports Power Save Mode (PSM) and Extended Discontinuous Reception (e‑DRX), which can extend battery lifetime up to 10 years. 3GPP Coverage Enhancement permits the module’s connectivity to reach deeper into buildings and basements, and even underground when compared to other air interface technologies such as GSM or Cat 1.

The SARA‑R4 Series covers applications in many areas, such as gas / water / electricity metering, city street lighting, building automation, HVAC, industrial monitoring and control, telematics, insurance, asset & vehicle tracking, security systems, alarm panels, outpatient monitoring and many consumer wearables. Product samples are available on request.

u-blox | www.u-blox.com

Web/Mobile Apps from PTC Target Industrial IoT Manufacturing

PTC has announced  the launch of new ThingWorx manufacturing apps. The new role-based manufacturing apps are fast to deploy and provide industrial companies with real-time operational intelligence to make more proactive and faster decisions. The apps are built on the ThingWorx platform, a purpose-built Industrial IoT platform that includes technologies and tools that enable companies to rapidly develop, deploy and extend apps and augmented reality experiences.

Controls-Advisor1

The ThingWorx manufacturing apps are part of a new generation of Industrial IoT web/mobile applications, which include the successful ThingWorx Navigate app. The manufacturing apps unify data from enterprise business systems and the sensored physical world, and deliver user information and real-time insight incontext for individual roles. The apps help simplify digital transformation, are fast to deploy, and allow for codeless app extensibility for ongoing rapid innovation. The ThingWorx manufacturing starter apps will be available via a free download and can be deployed in production in under one hour.

The new ThingWorx manufacturing apps include:

ThingWorx Controls Advisor (shown in photo above)— gives controls engineers the ability to rapidly connect to and remotely visualize data from virtually any Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), IoT Gateway or connected asset. It enables them to monitor and troubleshoot machine connectivity and provides instant notification of data communication errors that may cause the loss of critical production data. With proactive issue identification and rapid trending and troubleshooting, manufacturers can improve data quality and reliability and reduce unplanned downtime.

ThingWorx Asset Advisor — provides real-time visibility into the health and status of critical assets. The app alerts maintenance/service technicians to potential problems that may impact unplanned downtime and optimize maintenance execution, while delivering simple, easy-to-use capabilities to trend and troubleshoot issues. It remotely monitors and detects anomalies across various assets and allows users to understand asset performance and minimize unplanned downtime. Maintenance and service technicians can make better informed, faster decisions with unified real-time connectivity across critical production assets and take corrective action before problems impact production.

ThingWorx Production Advisor — rapidly unifies disparate sources of operational and business data. With the ThingWorx Production Advisor app, production managers have real-time visibility into production status and critical KPIs such as availability, performance, quality and Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE). The app also enables plant managers to monitor the real-time operational performance of the factory— all lines, all assets, with up-to-the-minute production status and performance KPIs. By having real-time machine and business data available in a contextualized format, the app delivers actionable intelligence to enable proactive and faster decision making to prevent problems and drive continuous improvement.

PTC | www.ptc.com  www.thingworx.com

Firms Team to Craft Single-Chip for Next-Gen IoT Networks

GlobalFoundries and VeriSilicon have inked a deal to deliver the industry’s first single-chip IoT solution for next-generation Low Power Wide Area (LPWA) networks. Leveraging GF’s 22FDX FD-SOI technology, the companies plan to develop IP that could enable a complete cellular modem module on a single chip, including integrated baseband, power management, RF radio and front-end module combining both Narrowband IoT (NB-IoT) and LTE-M capabilities.

Global Foundries Picture4

GF and VeriSilicon are developing a suite of IP to enable customers to create single chip cost- and power-optimized solutions for worldwide deployment, based on a dual-mode carrier-grade baseband modem with integrated RF front-end module. The design will be fabricated using GF’s 22FDX process, which leverages a 22nm FD-SOI technology platform. The technology provides cost-effective scaling and power reduction for IoT applications. According to GlobalFoundries, 22FDX is the only technology that allows efficient single-chip integration of RF, transceiver, baseband, processor, and power management components. This integration is expected to deliver more than an 80 percent improvement in both power and die size compared to today’s 40nm technologies.

GF and VeriSilicon expect to tape out a test chip based on the integrated solution, with silicon validation in Q4 2017. The companies plan to pursue carrier certification in mid-2018.

GlobalFoundries | www.globalfoundries.com

Semtech’s LoRa Technology Enables Rural IoT Network for Farmers

Semtech has announced its collaboration with National Narrowband Network Communications (NNNCo) to build a nationwide rural IoT network to bring high-tech agriculture solutions to Australian farmers. The LoRaWAN open standard developed by the LoRa Alliance is expected to help transform Australia’s farms, giving farmers real-time data on soil moisture, rainfall, crops, water levels, and livestock through a network of in situ low-cost wireless sensors. One of the key comptabilities of a LoRaWAN is that it enables users to communicate bi-directionally with sensors on an individual or group level.

LoRa-NNNCo-PR-graphic-press

The sensors use limited power and can operate ‘in the field’ for years without the need for intervention. The farmer will be able to make intelligent, sound decisions to drive multiple functions, including irrigation, livestock feed stations, water pumps, and emergency signals. The LoRaWAN network will immediately cover one million acres of farmland across rural New South Wales (NSW) which will encompass dry land crops, horticulture and livestock and a number of rural towns. Within 18 months, the plan is to extend broadly across Australia.

Semtech’s LoRa wireless RF technology is a widely adopted long-range, low-power solution for IoT that gives telecom companies, IoT application makers and system integrators the feature set necessary to deploy low-cost, interoperable IoT networks, gateways, sensors, module products, and IoT services worldwide. IoT networks based on the LoRaWAN specification have been deployed in over 50 countries.

Semtech | www.semtech.com

Galdi Taps Eurotech’s IoT Gateway for Food Packaging Market

Eurotech has announced a design win with Galdi, a leading producer of packaging machines for the food market. Galdi chose Eurotech’s Multi-Service IoT Gateway ReliaGATE 10-20 to communicate with its production machines for valuable data collection, management and remote monitoring through Eurotech IoT Integration Platform Everyware Cloud.

ReliaGATE-10-20angle

Galdi selected Eurotech gateway because of its globally-compliant Wi-Fi and cellular certifications. Implementing this IoT technology will enable Galdi to remotely manage its plants and its customers by providing greater access to valuable data.

The ReliaGATE 10-20 is an industrial grade smart IoT gateway that provides communications, computation power and a simplified application framework for IoT platform integration and services applications. The gateway offers a variety of communication interfaces including cellular, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth enabling connectivity to a wide range of sensors and edge devices essential in M2M/IoT applications. It also includes interfaces for wired connectivity such as Dual Gigabit Ethernet, CANBus, up to four serial ports and three USB ports. ReliaGATE 10-20 is simple to manage and delivers out-of-the-box connectivity and intuitive configuration of the routing parameters thanks to a web GUI and over-the-air options.

Eurotech | www.eurotech.com

Philips Lighting and Google Join Board of Bluetooth SIG

The Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) has appointed representatives from Philips Lighting and Google to its board of directors. Ruud von Bokhorst and Martin Turon began serving their two-year board terms on July 1, 2017. The Bluetooth SIG Board of Directors is responsible for the management of the Bluetooth SIG, and has played a vital role in growing Bluetooth technology into the global wireless standard for simple, secure connectivity, shipping more the 3 billion products each year.

Bluetoothjpg

Ruud van Bokhorst manages the Wireless Networks Program within Philips Lighting – Standards & Regulations, and is responsible for the wireless network standardization roadmap within the Philips Lighting Innovation sector. Over the course of his career, van Bokhorst has had the opportunity to lead change processes, negotiate Philips’ interests with competitors, steer teams of experts, and build bridges between various disciplines, nationalities, and cultures. In addition to his new role within the Bluetooth SIG, van Bokhorst serves in leadership positions in Lighting and Building Automation Standardization organizations, including Secretary General of the Fairhair Alliance and General Manager of the new organization for DÃLI technology (DiiA).

Martin Turon is a Wireless Architect at Google and Nest Labs focusing on Internet of Things platforms and embedded low-power wireless products. Martin has more than 13 years of experience in the development of wireless sensor network products and standards, and has pioneered commercialization of the technology in the asset tracking, environmental monitoring, structural monitoring, and smart home verticals.

With these new appointments, the Bluetooth SIG board now consists of the following member companies; Apple, AwoX, Ericsson, Google, Intel, Lenovo, Microsoft, Nokia, Philips Lighting, Polar, and Toshiba.

Bluetooth SIG | www.bluetooth.com

Don’t Miss CC’s Newsletter: IoT Technology Watch

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) phenomenon is rich with opportunity. Circuit Cellar’s IoT Technology Focus themed newsletter is coming to your inbox tomorrow. The newsletter will update you on the latest news and trends including IoT gateways, IoT device security, IoT wireless connectivity and IoT cloud implementations.

Already a Circuit Cellar Newsletter subscriber? Great!
You’ll get your “IoT Technology Focus” themed newsletter issue tomorrow.

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Don’t be left out! Sign up now:

Remember, our new enhanced weekly CC Newsletter will switch its theme each week, so look for these in upcoming weeks:

Embedded Boards. This content looks at embedded board-level computers. The focus here is on modules (e.g., Arduino, Raspberry Pi, COM Express, and other small-form-factor modules) that ease prototyping efforts and let you smoothly scale up production volumes.

Analog & Power. This newsletter content zeros in on the latest developments in analog and power technologies including DC-DC converters, AD-DC converters, power supplies, op-amps, batteries, and more.

Microcontroller Watch. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on latest microcontroller news. In this section, we examine the microcontrollers along with their associated tools and support products.

BLE Module Boasts Integrated MEMS Sensors

Telit has announced BlueMod+S42M, a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) 4.2, standalone, single-mode module with embedded 3-axis accelerometer, temperature and humidity sensors. The cost-effective component is optimized for efficiency and simplicity in end-device design and manufacturing, delivering reliable Bluetooth Low Energy functionality with robust endpoint security, motion and environmental sensors and essential features that reduce development costs, bill of materials, and time to market.

Telit BlueMod S42 FrontDynamic RGB

Ideal for large scale projects, the BlueMod+S42M seamlessly expedites device design across a wide range of industrial and consumer applications areas. The embedded sensors are necessary for high-value, fragile asset tracking, and time- or temperature-sensitive applications such as cold chain monitoring in the pharmaceutical and agriculture industries.

Telit | www.telit.com

NXP and Widex Team for Wireless Audio Streaming Hearing Aids

NXP Semiconductors and Widex announced that they have collaborated to develop, test and integrate NXP’s NxH2003 Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) audio streaming SoC into Widex BEYOND hearing aids. The two companies worked closely together throughout the product development cycle, merging the best of hearing aid engineering and wireless audio streaming semiconductor technology, to deliver hearing aid devices that can stream wireless audio from an iOS device, consuming only 2.8 mA current at 1.2 Volts, which is best in industry. This allows end users to enjoy music directly from their personal devices for prolonged periods of time.

iphone

NXP’s state-of-the-art BLE 4.1 certified solution measures only 7.25mm2 and has industry-lowest receive and transmit power levels of 4mW and 7mW respectively. The NxH2003 forms a total solution for ultra-low power wireless audio streaming as it embeds both an M0 microcontroller (running the protocol stack and application), as well as an embedded CoolFlux DSP (running all of the required audio processing including sample rate conversion and audio [de]compression). Furthermore, this advanced IC is highly integrated and can run directly from a Zinc-Air battery as typically used in hearing aids, which minimizes the number of external components and consequently reduces the volume of the end product.

Technologies and solutions for hearing aids and consumer hearables are converging as both markets share closely related use cases while at the same time facing similar end-user requirements and technology barriers. Both markets strive to design smaller and more comfortable end devices exhibiting longer battery life. Additionally, both hearing aid and consumer hearables companies recognize that users desire more functionality from their devices, ranging from the ability to sync with their phones, for calls, music, and games to biometric measurements for health monitoring.

NXP offers solutions for both markets. NXP has been providing proprietary NFMI (Near Field Magnetic Induction) technology to the hearing instrument industry for nearly a decade. And at CES earlier this year, the company debuted its NFMI-based MiGLO solutions with several OEMs in smart consumer hearables. The NXP MiGLO platform is designed to enable long battery life, exceptional audio quality and reliable wireless experiences while enabling the development of smarter, smaller and comfortable truly wireless earbuds or hearables.

NXP Semiconductors | www.nxp.com

August Circuit Cellar: A Sneak Preview

The August (325) issue of Circuit Cellar magazine is jammed packed with useful technical information and inspiring, intriguing embedded electronics design stories.

Not a Circuit Cellar subscriber?  Don’t be left out! Sign up today:

 

Here’s a sneak preview of August Circuit Cellar:

FUN WITH GUITAR AMPLIFIERS!

Digital Guitar Amplifier/ Effects Processor—Part 2
Brian Millier details the digital guitar amplifier/effects unit he built using two Teensy Arduino modules.

A Range of Power Supplies for Hollow-State Guitar Amplifiers
Richard Honeycutt compares several different power supplies used for hollow-state guitar amplifiers.

MICROCONTROLLERS & PROCESSORS!

Firmware Upgrade with the PIC32
Nick Sicalides delves into performing firmware upgrades using a bootloader on the Microchip PIC32

Getting Started with PSoC Microcontrollers (Part 2): Putting PSoC to Work
Nishant Mittal goes even deeper on the Cypress PSoC providing some useful design examples.

Moore’s Law and the Chip Industry’s Perfect Storm
In this Interview Q&A Krste Asanovic explains RISC-V and the open sourcing of processor architecture.

SECURITY & RELIABILITY & ENCRYPTION!

Power Analysis of a Software DES Encryption Routine
Columnist Colin O’Flynn examines how to break a software implementation of the DES security routine.

Reliability and Failure Prediction: A New Take
Craig Armenti and Dave Wiens discuss a better way to simulate PCB vibration and acceleration.

Preventing Unwanted Entry
Columnist Jeff Bachiochi takes us inside his exploration of electronic lock systems, getting down to the fine details.

Future of Embedded Security: Wi-Fi to the Danger Zone
This guest essay by Adam Cecchetti, CEO of Deja vu Security, explains how memory leaks in your embedded system could have life or death consequences.

AND MORE FROM OUR EXPERT COLUMNISTS:

Automatic Control (Part 4) The Implementation
George Novacek describes the PID temperature controller he built for a meat smoker.

Fully Differential Amplifiers
Robert Lacoste sings the praises of fully differential amplifiers and presents a few designs using them.

Build an Embedded Systems Consulting Company (Part 5) Axiom Wrap-Up
Bob Japenga shares more insights on running a successful embedded design firm built to last.

Qseven Module Sports Apollo Lake Processor

Axiomtek has released the Q7M311, a new Qseven module with Intel Apollo Lake processor, dual display interfaces, 32 Gbytes of eMMC memory, and wide operating temperature supported. The Q7M311 has adopted the 14nm Intel Pentium N4200 and Celeron N3350 quad-core/dual-core processors (codename: Apollo Lake). The extremely small embedded module supports 4 Gbytes (or optionally up to 8 Gbytes) of DDR3L memory onboard. With a seismic design and for industrial-grade temperatures, both the CPU and the DDR3L RAM are soldered to deliver reliable and excellent computing performance. With rich features embedded in all the components built in a small form factor, the industrial-grade computer-on-module is aimed for industrial IoT applications, including industrial control, medical imaging, digital signage, gaming machines, military, and networking.

Axiomtek q7m311

Advanced connectivity includes four PCIe x1 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, four USB 3.0 ports, one Gigabit Ethernet (built-in Intel Ethernet controller i211AT), two SATA-600 interfaces, and eight inputs/outputs of general purpose for peripheral devices and data transfer. Also, the LPC bus is available for easy connection of legacy I/O interfaces. This powerful Qseven embedded board runs well with Windows 10 and Linux operating system and supports Axiomtek AXView 2.0 intelligent remote management software.

Axiomtek | www.axiomtek.com