About Nan Price

Nan Price is an Associate Editor at Circuit Cellar. You can reach her at nprice@circuitcellar.com and @assoceditor_cc.

EMC Measurement Technology

LangerSX near-field probes enable electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) analyses of interferences emitted by electronic boards, components, and IC pins with high internal frequencies. The SX-R3-1 magnetic H-field probe is designed to detect high-frequency magnetic fields with a high geometrical resolution. The field orientation and distribution can be detected by moving the probe around conductor runs, bypass capacitors, EMC components, and within IC pin and supply system areas. The SX-E03 E-field probe detects bus structures and larger components.

The probes have a 1-to-10-GHz frequency range. Their high resolution (the SX R3-1 achieves 1 mm and the SX E03 covers up to 4 mm × 4 mm) enables them to pinpoint RF sources on densely packed boards or on IC pins. The magnetic-field probe heads are electrically shielded. The probes are connected to a spectrum analyzer input via a shielded cable and SMA connectors during measurement. High clock rates of 2 GHz, for example, may result in fifth-order harmonics of up to 10 GHz. These harmonics are coupled out by RF sources on the board (e.g., conductor-run segments, ICs, and other components). They may stimulate other structural parts of the board to oscillate and emit interferences.

Contact Langer for pricing.

Langer EMV-Technik
www.langer-emv.com

Q&A: Raspberry Pi Innovation

Orlando, FL-based web app developer and blogger Shea Silverman recently received Kickstarter funding for the latest version of PiPlay, his Raspberry Pi-based OS. Shea and I discussed his ongoing projects, his Raspberry Pi book, and what’s next for PiPlay.—Nan Price, Associate Editor

 

silverman

Shea Silverman

NAN: What is your current occupation?

SHEA: Web applications developer with the Center for Distributed Learning at the University of Central Florida (UCF).

NAN: Why and when did you decide to start your blog?

SHEA: I’ve been blogging on and off for years, but I could never keep to a schedule or really commit myself to writing. After I started working on side projects, I realized I needed a place to store tips and tricks I had figured out. I installed WordPress, posted some PhoneGap tips, and within a day got a comment from someone who had the same issue, and my tips helped them out. I have been blogging ever since. I make sure to post every Friday night.

NAN: Tell us about PiPlay, the Raspberry Pi OS. Why did you start the OS? What new developments, if any, are you working on?

piplay-case

Shea’s PiPlay Raspberry Pi OS recently reached 400% funding on Kickstarter.

SHEA: PiPlay is a gaming and emulation distribution for the Raspberry Pi single-board computer. It is built on top of the Raspbian OS, and tries to make it as easy as possible to play games on your Raspberry Pi. My blog got really popular after I started posting binaries and tutorials on how to compile different emulators to the Raspberry Pi, but I kept getting asked the same questions and saw users struggling with the same consistent issues.

I decided I would release a disk image with everything preconfigured and ready to be loaded onto an SD card. I’ve been adding new emulators, games, and tools to it ever since.

I just recently completed a Kickstarter that is funding the next release, which includes a much nicer front end, a web GUI, and a better controller configuration system.

NAN: You wrote Instant Raspberry Pi Gaming. Do you consider this book introductory or is it written for the more experienced engineer?

SHEA: Instant Raspberry Pi Gaming is written like a cookbook with recipes for doing various tasks. Some of them are very simple, and they build up to some more advanced recipes. One of the easier tasks is creating your user account on the Pi Store, while the more advanced recipes have you working with Python and using an API to interact with Minecraft.

Readers will learn how to setup a Raspberry Pi, install and use various emulators and games, a bit about the Minecraft API, and common troubleshooting tips.

pitroller

The Pitroller is a joystick and buttons hooked up to the GPIO pins of a Raspberry Pi, which can act as a controller or keyboard for various emulators.

NAN: You are a member of FamiLAB, an Orlando, FL-based community lab/hackerspace. What types of projects have you worked on at the lab?

miniarcade

Disney director Rich Moore poses with Shea’s miniature arcade machine. The machine was based on Fix It Felix Jr. from Disney’s Wreck It Ralph.

SHEA: I spend a lot of time at the lab using the laser cutter. Creating a 2-D vector in Inkscape, and then watching it be cut out on a piece of wood or acrylic is really inspiring. My favorite project was making a little arcade machine featuring Fix It Felix Jr. from Wreck It Ralph. A marketing person from Disney was able to get it into the hands of the director Rich Moore. He sent me a bunch of pictures of himself holding my little arcade machine next to the full size version.

NAN: Give us a little background information. How did you become interested in technology?

SHEA: My mom always likes to remind me that I’ve been using computers since I was 2. My parents were very interested in technology and encouraged my curiosity when it came to computers. I always liked to take something apart and see how it worked, and then try to put it back together. As the years went on, I’ve devoted more and more time to making technology a major part of my life.

NAN: Tell us about the first embedded system you designed.

SHEA: I have a lot of designs, but I don’t think I’ve ever finished one. I’ll be halfway into a project, learn about something new, then cannibalize what I was working on and repurpose it for my new idea. One of the first embedded projects I worked on was a paintball board made out of a PICAXE microcontroller. I never got it small enough to fit inside the paintball marker, but it was really cool to see everything in action. The best part was when I finally had that “ah-ha!” moment, and everything I was learning finally clicked.

NAN: What was the last electronics-design related product you purchased and what type of project did you use it with?

SHEA: At UCF, one of our teams utilizes a ticket system for dealing with requests. Our department does a hack day each semester, so my coworker and I decided to rig up a system that changes the color of the lights in the office depending on the urgency of requests in the box. We coded up an API and had a Raspberry Pi ping the API every few minutes for updates. We then hooked up two Arduinos to the Raspberry Pi and color-changing LED strips to the Arduinos. We set it up and it’s been working for the past year and a half, alerting the team with different colors when there is work to do.

NAN: Are you currently working on or planning any projects?

SHEA: My Kickstarter for PiPlay just finished at 400% funding. So right now I’m busy working on fulfilling the rewards, and writing the latest version of PiPlay.

NAN: What do you consider to be the “next big thing” in the industry?

SHEA: Wearable computing. Google Glass, the Pebble smart watch, Galaxy Gear—I think these are all great indicators of where our technology is heading. We currently have very powerful computers in our pockets with all kinds of sensors and gadgets built in, but very limited ways to physically interact with them (via the screen, or a keypad). If we can make the input devices modular, be it your watch, a heads-up display, or something else, I think that is going to spark a new revolution in user experiences.

Integrated Wi-Fi System in Package Module

EconaisThe EC19W01 is a small, smart, highly integrated 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi system in package (SiP) module. The module is well suited for home automation and smart appliances; Wi-Fi audio speakers and headphones; wireless sensors and sensor networks; wireless monitoring (audio and video); smart appliances; health care and fitness devices; wearable devices; security, authentication, and admittance control; lighting; building/energy/industrial management/control; cloud-connected devices; remote control, data acquisition, and monitoring; and machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) design.

The EC19W01’s features include an integrated 32-bit processor to support application customization, on-board flash and antenna, low power consumption, support for Serial-to-Wi-Fi and SPI-to-Wi-Fi, wireless transmit/receive rates of up to 20 Mbps, and a small 14-mm × 16-mm × 2.8-mm footprint.

Contact Econais for pricing.

Econais, Inc.
www.econais.com

Q&A: Embedded Applications Consultant and Hacker Quinn Dunki

Quinn Dunki is more than just a hacker. This Los Angeles, CA-based embedded applications consultant and software game developer enjoys working on her homebrew 8-bit computer and dreams of a future filled with hackerspace-type libraries.—Nan Price, Associate Editor

 

NAN: Tell us about your computer game company, One Girl, One Laptop Productions. How did the company begin?

Quinn Dunki

Quinn Dunki

QUINN: I had been in the AAA games industry for most of my career. I’ve been making games in my spare time since I was six years old, but the “actually-getting-paid-for-it” time started in the 1990s with the Nintendo 64.

I’ve written games on everything from the Apple II to the Playstation 3. I worked at various companies including Bungie Studios and 3DO.

My longest stint was eight good years at a small studio called Pandemic in Los Angeles, CA. In 2009, the company was in financial trouble and was sold to Electronic Arts with the intention it would keep it going. Electronic Arts opted to close the studio down shortly thereafter. We got some severance with our walking papers, and I decided to spin that money into One Girl, One Laptop Productions

This was just at the tail end of the initial gold rush on Apple’s iOS platform, and it still seemed like there was money to be made there. Unfortunately, there was subsequently a mad rush to the bottom on pricing for iPhone games. Before I could establish a presence, the space got very crowded almost overnight. Low-volume, high-quality indie games became financially unviable (though I think they’re coming back now). I still do independent game development on the side, but my primary business now is consulting and hired-gun engineering for other companies needing mobile or embedded applications.

Quinn has two workspaces. She uses this one for the “small clean stuff.”

Quinn has two workspaces. She uses this one for the “small clean stuff.”

Quinn’s other workspace is used for the “big dirty stuff.”

NAN: Describe some of the software One Girl, One Laptop Productions develops. Do you have a favorite?

QUINN: As much as I love games, my true love is engineering itself. My favorite projects always end up being the ones with the most complex challenges. I don’t think I could pick just one.

A good recent example is the Olloclip, which is a combination photography app and lens attachment for the iPhone. The main killer feature is real-time barrel distortion correction that made for some very interesting development challenges.

Much like game consoles, working on mobile devices is often about taking a well-understood algorithm and making it work on a platform so small that nobody thinks it will be possible. On AAA games, I used to try and build complex artificial intelligence (AI) systems that ran in 3 ms of frame time. Now I’m trying to cram gigabyte-scale image processing systems into devices with little memory, minimal graphics processing units (GPUs), and slow CPUs. They are similar challenges with completely different contexts. Some days it feels like you’re trying to model high-energy particle physics on a washing machine, but it’s a great when you finally do solve a problem like that. It’s the engineering of the thing that’s exciting, whatever that thing is this week.

Another favorite has been the ICEdot project. It’s a health and safety sensor system that works with your mobile device and is targeted at athletes and coaches. It’s a fun mix of mobile and embedded systems development and it has pushed my skill set into a number of new areas—in particular, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE), which is an exciting new technology. ICEdot is on the bleeding edge of that, and it’s been a big challenge to use it in the real world.

NAN: What types of projects did you work on while you were a Senior Engineer at Pandemic Studios?

QUINN: I started my tenure there on a squad tactics training simulator Pandemic was building for Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation Command (STRICOM), an experimental technology branch of the US Army. It’s a long story, but that simulator was later spun into a series of Xbox games called Full Spectrum Warrior.

The biggest project I worked on was an open-world game set in World War II called Saboteur. Unlike the usual shooter format the WWII genre is littered with, this was a third-person action-adventure game with a noir art style. Saboteur was a hugely ambitious project, and the awesome team there solved some very big challenges. We did things with physics, rendering, AI, clambering, animation, toolchains, content streaming, and game design that no game had done before. As so often happens with AAA games, the marketing budget was pulled at the last moment, so you can add it to the long list of “Greatest Games That Nobody Played.”

NAN: Your blog-style website BlondiHacks features hacking projects involving everything from development boards to two-layer PCB etching. Tell us about the types of projects you enjoy hacking.

QUINN: BlondiHacks is my outlet for whatever whim that comes to mind as far as hacking. I think hacking is more than a hobby—it’s kind of a way of life. It’s about shaping your environment to be what you think it should be. It’s about saving things from landfills and giving new life to forgotten or underappreciated artifacts. It’s part creativity, part environmentalism, part self-reliance, and all good times.

It’s fun to talk about stuff you’re doing, but most of my flights of fancy are so obscure or odd that only a select few would find them interesting. The power of the Internet is that it connects all of us oddballs to each other. Hence, BlondiHacks.

NAN: How did you become interested in technology?

QUINN: I don’t recall a time when I wasn’t interested, honestly, so that transition must have occurred before my brain was retaining memories. What age is that? Three? Four?
I may have been born with a multimeter in my hand (though my mom would probably have noted that in the medical report). My mom likes to say, the day they brought the Apple II into the house (when I was around age five) I crawled up on the stool and haven’t moved since.

To prolong her toothbrush’s life, Quinn replaced a toothbrush battery with a nickel–cadmium battery and added wires to the old battery’s PCB mount points.

To prolong her toothbrush’s life, Quinn replaced a toothbrush battery with a nickel–cadmium battery and added wires to the old battery’s PCB mount points.

NAN: What was your first project?

QUINN: That’s difficult to say, since my life is a series of endless overlapping projects. As soon as I was old enough to hold a soldering iron, I built a lot of things from the seminal Forrest Mims book RadioShack sold. You know the one: Getting Started in Electronics.
That book was my bible for many years. I remember hacking a remote-control truck to have headlights and speed control. I remember building a working guillotine for a school project about the French Revolution. It was 4’ tall and genuinely dangerous. I carried it on the bus and demonstrated it on bourgeoisie bananas in class. I don’t imagine kids would get away with that today.

More recently, my interest in hacking was probably rekindled with the simple act of replacing the “non-user-serviceable” battery in a very expensive toothbrush (see “Toothbrush Repair”). That was five years ago, and I’m still using that toothbrush today. To me, that’s the purest essence of hacking right there—fixing the one weakness in a product that would have otherwise halved its useful life.

Quinn’s homebrew computer, Veronica, includes a clock circuit and a CPU. The breadboard is shown.

Quinn’s homebrew computer, Veronica, includes a clock circuit and a CPU. The breadboard is shown.

NAN: Are you currently working on or planning any projects?

QUINN: My biggest hobby project recently has been my homebrew computer, Veronica (see “Veronica”). The Apple II I mentioned was very formative for me, and [Apple Computer founder] Steve Wozniak was a bit of a hero figure. My whole life, I wanted to know how one person could just sit down and create something like that.

A couple of years ago, with no formal training in electrical engineering, I decided to see if I could do it. Veronica is the result, and it was the fulfillment of a lifelong goal to build a functioning, usable, 8-bit computer from scratch, complete with video graphics array (VGA) bitmapped video, a keyboard, game controllers, and built-in Pong.

Today, my most active project is repairing, restoring, and modifying an early 1990s Bally/Williams pinball machine called Johnny Mnemonic (see “Johnny”). Anyone who likes hacking should be into pinball machines. They are wonderlands of mechanical systems, electronics, software, and game theory all rolled into one. They are also bottomless pits of hacking and tinkering potential (not to mention money pits and time sinks).

Another big ongoing project is our 24 Hours of LeMons race team. The short version is that it’s a (very) low-budget form of endurance auto racing that involves a whole lot of hacking of all kinds. That’s probably an entire interview unto itself, but I feel I should at least mention it, since it’s such a big part of my hacking time.

Quinn is in the process of hacking a Bally/Williams Johnny Mnemonic pinball machine. This photo shows the machine’s circuitry.

Quinn is in the process of hacking a Bally/Williams Johnny Mnemonic pinball machine. This photo shows the machine’s circuitry.

NAN: What do you consider to be the “next big thing” in the industry?

QUINN: One “big idea“ that has been put forward that I’m excited about is the notion of hackerspaces replacing public libraries. The Internet is gradually replacing the role of pure information access that libraries have served. It has been suggested that access to high-end technology creation tools is the next such area where playing field leveling is required. Anyone wanting to improve their station in life by executing their ideas in a high-tech world will need access to CNC machines, 3-D printers, machine tools, high-end computer-aided design (CAD), video production software, and so forth.

Libraries are generally well located and already equipped with things such as fire exits, sprinkler systems, and commercial-grade electrical. Converting some libraries into hackerspaces sounds to me like a terrific use of public funds. It’s a bit “pie in the sky,” but places like Edmonton in Alberta, Canada, and North Logan, UT, are already experimenting with the idea. This is like hacking democracy itself, and I love it.

8-Bit Microcontroller IP Core

DigitalCoreDesignThe DF6808 IP core is binary-compatible with the industry-standard Motorola 68HC08 8-bit microcontroller. The IP core uses sophisticated on-chip peripheral capabilities to perform 45 to 100 million instructions per second. FAST architecture implemented in DF6808 enables the 68HC08 microcontroller to run at least three times faster than the original solution.

The DF6808’s 16-bit, free-running timer system has two input-capture lines and two output-compare lines. The IP core is equipped with proprietary safety functions, including self-monitoring circuitry, which helps protect against system errors; the computer operating properly (COP) watchdog system, which protects against software failures; and an illegal opcode detection circuit, which provides a non-maskable interrupt if an illegal opcode occurs.

For power conservation, the IP core includes two software-controlled power-saving modes (Wait and Stop). These modes make the DF6808 IP core well suited for automotive and battery-driven applications.

The DF6808 includes the DoCDTM real-time hardware debugger, which provides built-in support for Digital Core Design’s hardware debug system and the debugging capability of an entire system-on-a-chip (SoC). The DoCDTM enables nonintrusive debugging of running applications. It can halt, run, step into, or skip an instruction and read/write any microcontroller contents, including all registers, user-defined peripherals, data, and program memories.

Contact Digital Core Design for pricing.

Digital Core Design
www.dcd.pl