The Future of IoT Security

By Haydn Povey

Unlimited opportunity. That’s what comes to mind when I think about the future of the Internet of Things (IoT). And, that is both a blessing and a curse.

As the IoT proliferates, billions of cloud-connected devices are expected to be designed, manufactured, and deployed over the next decade. Our increasingly connected world will become hyper-connected, transforming our lives in ways we likely never thought possible. We will see smarter cities where the commuter is automatically guided, smarter farming where livestock health is individually monitored with on-call veterinary services, smarter healthcare to reduce the spiraling costs, integration between smart white goods and utilities to manage grid loading, and the integration of smart retail and personal assistant AI to provide a “curated” shopping experience. That future is limitless and exciting. But it is also frightening. We have already seen the headlines of how attacks have impacted businesses and people with valuable data being stolen or ransomed. It is widely believed the attacks are just starting.

Devices—not often seen as likely hacking targets—now have the potential to be weaponized. No one wants a device or application that is prone to hacking or theft. Hacks, malware, and IP theft have a significant dollar cost and can destroy corporate brands and reputations. And these devices may have extended lifecycles of decades. And a “secure” connected device does not guarantee a secure system. All too often, security has been an after-thought in the development of systems.

Hardware, software, communications, and communications protocol, device commissioning, applications layers, and other systems considerations all could impact security of a device and its data. The future of IoT must see security become an integral part of the design and deployment process, not merely an after-thought or add-on.

Delivering security-orientated embedded systems is a major challenge today. It will take a strong ecosystem and the development of a “supply chain of trust” to deliver truly secure product creation, deployment, and lifecycle management for the rapidly evolving IoT marketplace.

Security needs to be architected into devices from the moment of inception. In addition, it needs to be extended across the supply chain, from security-orientated chips through to manufacturing and management for the lifecycle of the product.

To deliver secure manufacturing and ensure no malware can be injected, cold and hard cryptography principles must be relied upon to ensure solutions are secured. Security principles should be embedded in every aspect of the system from the delivery of secure foundations in the silicon device, through to the secure mastering and encryption of the OEM codebase to ensure it is protected. The programming and manufacturing stages may then freely handle the encrypted code base, but the utilization of secure appliances, which integrate high-integrity and high-availability hardware security modules, enables secure enclaves to be integrated into the process to manage and orchestrate all key material. Furthermore, the ability to encrypt applications within the development process and subsequently decrypt the images in place within the device is a critical to securing the intellectual property.

While simple in theory, there are multiple aspects of a system that must be secured, encompassing the device, the mastering of the application, the handling and sharing of the keys, and the loading of the application on to the device. The only real solution is to develop a “zero trust” approach across the supply chain to minimize vulnerabilities and continually authenticate and individualize deliverables as far as possible.

While this integrated approach cannot resolve all aspects of counterfeiting, it does mark a key rallying point for the industry, and finally enables the industry to start to draw a line under the mass counterfeiting and over-production of devices. And all stakeholders in the process—including device platform providers, OEMs, programming centers, contract manufacturers, end users, security experts, and standards bodies—must do their parts to make cyber-secure programming and manufacturing ubiquitous, easy to use, and easily adoptable.

As I said, the future of IoT holds limitless opportunity, and that will drive new solutions. There will be new business models and new ecosystems. The threats are real, and the cost of failure could be astronomical. So, for the future of IoT to be bright, it must start with security.

This article appears in Circuit Cellar 324.

Haydn Povey [Headshot - Colour]Haydn Povey is the Founder/CEO of Secure Thingz, a company focused on developing and delivering next-generation security technology into the Internet of Things (IoT) and other connected systems. He also currently sits on the Executive Steering Board of the IoT Security Foundation. Haydn has been in senior management at leading global technology companies for more than 20 years, including 10 years in senior marketing and business development roles at ARM.

13.6 GHz, Next-Generation Wideband Synthesizer

Analog Devices has launched the ADF5356, which is a 13.6 GHz next-generation wideband synthesizer with an integrated voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO). The ADF5356 is well-suited for a variety of applications, including wireless infrastructure, microwave point-to-point links, electronic test and measurement, and satellite terminals. The ADF4356 is a complementary synthesizer product that operates to 6.8 GHz and is comparable in performance.

Analog-ADF5356

The ADF5356’s and ADF4356’s features, specs, and benefits:

  • Generate RF outputs from 53.125 MHz to 13.6 GHz without gaps in frequency coverage
  • Offer superior PLL figures of merit (FOM), ultra-low VCO phase noise, very low integer-boundary and phase-detector spurs, and high phase-comparison frequency.
  • Feature VCO phase noise (–113 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz offset at 5 GHz) with integrated RMS jitter of just 97 fs (1 kHz to 20 MHz) and integer-channel noise floor of –227 dBc/Hz
  • Phase detector spurious levels are below –85 dBc (typical), and the phase detector comparison frequency can be as high as 125 MHz.
  • Fully supported by the ADIsimPLL, which is Analog Devices’s easy-to-use PLL synthesizer design and simulation tool. The synthesizers are pin-compatible with Analog Devices’s existing ADF5355 and ADF4355 devices.
  • Specified over the –40°C to 85°C range
  • Operate from nominal 3.3-V analog and digital power supplies as well as 5-V charge-pump and VCO supplies
  • Features 1.8-V logic-level compatibility

The ADF5356 costs $39.98 in 1,000-unit quantities. The ADF4356 costs $20.36 in 1,000-piece quantities. The EV-ADF5356SD1Z pre-release boards cost $450 each.

Analog Devices | www.analog.com

USB Microphone Array Serves Voice-Activated Applications

The new miniDSP UMA-8 is a high-performance yet low-cost multichannel USB microphone array built around XMOS multicore technology, designed for voice-recognition application development. Seven high-performance MEMS microphones are configured in a circular arrangement to provide high-quality voice capture for a wide range of applications. Leveraging the onboard DSP processing, the UMA-8 supports voice algorithms including beamforming, noise reduction, acoustic echo cancellation, and de-reverb.

miniDSPUMA 8BoardFlight

Developed with applications in voice-activated control, smart assistants, robotics, conferencing, and more in mind, the UMA-8 pocket-size platform targets both DIYers and the OEM market, and was engineered for flexibility in firmware, software and hardware. For advanced users, full control and configuration of the DSP array processing parameters are available with a real-time GUI. This can be used to fine tune the various algorithms: acoustic echo cancellation, noise reduction, voice activation detect, and so on, dramatically improving voice pickup.

The UMA-8 costs $95. Step-by-step application notes are available for setup and configuration of the UMA-8 with the most common smart assistants currently available, including Amazon Alexa Voice + Raspberry Pi, Microsoft Cortana, and Apple Siri. miniDSP will be expanding those application notes in the future.

miniDSP | www.minidsp.com

Protocol Analyzer Supports Bluetooth Low Energy

Saelig Co. recently announced the availability of Teledyne LeCroy’s BPA low-energy Bluetooth Protocol Analyzer. The portable, USB-powered protocol analyzer is well suited for use in both a lab and the field. The analyzer’s features, benefits, and specs:

  • Supports mandatory Bluetooth low-energy features through Bluetooth version 4.2
  • Includes Frontline software
  • Includes DecoderScript software that enables proprietary data to be fully decoded and displayed in the Frontline software along the other Bluetooth profiles and protocols
  • Compact size (3.5″ × 1.75″ × 0.71″)
  • Easy to set up and doesn’t require synchronization to devices

Saelig Teledyne bpa-analyzer

The BPA low energy Bluetooth Protocol Analyzer costs $995.

Saelig Co. | www.saelig.com

High-Performing, Intelligent Wireless Transceiver Module

The RF Solutions high-performance ZETA module was recently updated to include a simple SPI and UART interface. The ZETAPLUS module doesn’t require external components, which means a fast and effective plug-and-play setup.

ZETAPLUS

Available on 433-, 868-, and 915-MHz frequencies, the module is easy to set up and you’ll be sending and receiving data quickly. Furthermore, you’ll find it easy to create networks of ZETAPLUS modules or point-to-point links without the need for time-consuming register configuration.

With an impressive 2-km range, the ZETAPLUS is well-suited for sensor networks, sleepy nodes, and numerous other telemetry, control, and Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

RF Solutions | www.rfsolutions.co.uk

Issue 324: EQ Questions

Review these four Test Your EQ problems that appeared in Circuit Cellar 324. Test your knowledge. Answers appear in issue 325.

Problem 1: In the following circuit, pick a value for Rx that sets the quiescent voltage at the collector to Vcc/2. The hFE (current transfer ratio) of the transistor is 100, and you can use the approximation that the internal emitter resistance re = 25 mV / Ic.

eq0690_fig1


Problem 2: What determines the low-frequency (high-pass) cutoff frequency of this circuit?


Problem 3: What is the high-pass cutoff frequency?


Problem 4: What is the best way to lower the cutoff frequency while at the same time reducing the loading on the signal source?

Graphene Revolution

The Wonderful Material That Will Change
the World of Electronics

The amazing properties of graphene have researchers, students, and inventors dreaming about exciting new applications, from unbreakable touchscreens to fast-charging batteries.

By Wisse Hettinga

Prosthetic hand with graphene electrodes

Prosthetic hand with graphene electrodes

Graphene gained popularity because of the way it is produced—the “Scotch tape method.” In fact, two scientists, Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov, received a Nobel Prize in 2004 for their work with the material. Their approach is straightforward. Using Scotch tape, they repeatedly removed small layers of graphite (indeed, the black stuff found in pencils) until there was only one 2-D layer of atoms left—graphene. Up to that point, many scientists understood the promise of this wonderful material, but no one had been able to get obtain a single layer of atoms. After the breakthrough, many universities started looking for graphene-related applications.

Innovative graphene-related research is underway all over the world. Today, many European institutes and universities work together under the Graphene Flagship initiative (http://graphene-flagship.eu), which was launched by the European Union in 2009. The initiative’s aim is to exchange knowledge and collaborate on research projects.

Graphene was a hot topic at the 2017 Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, Spain. This article covers a select number of applications talked about at the show. But for the complete coverage, check out the video here:

WEARABLE SENSORS FOR PROSTHETICS

The Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT) in Genova, Italy, recently developed a sensor from a cellulose and graphene composite. The sensor can be made in the form of a bracelet that fits around the arm in order to pick up the small signals associated with muscle movement. The signals are processed and used to drive a robotic prosthetic hand. Once the comfortable bracelet is placed on the wrist, it transduces the movement of the hand into electrical signals that are used to move the artificial hand in a spectacular way. More information: www.iit.it

GRAPHENE & CONVENTIONAL CMOS TECHNOLOGIES

The Scotch tape method used by the Nobel Prize winners inspired a lot of companies around the world to start producing graphene. Today, a wide variety of methods can be used depending on the actual application of the material. Graphenea (San Sebastian, Spain) is using different processes for the production of graphene products. One of them is Chemical Vapor Deposition. With this method, it is possible to create graphene on thin foil, silicon based or in form of oxide. They source many universities and research institutes that do R&D for new components such as supercapacitors, solar, batteries, and many more applications. The big challenge is to develop an industrial process that will combine graphene material with the conventional CMOS technology. In this way, the characteristics of graphene can enhance today’s components to make them useful for new applications. A good example is optical datatransfer. More information: www.graphenea.com

Transfer graphene on top of a silicon device to add more functionality

Transfer graphene on top of a silicon device to add more functionality

T5G DATA COMMUNICATION

High-speed data communication comes in all sizes and infrastructures. But on the small scale, there are many challenges. Graphene enables new optical communication on the chip level. A consortium of CNIT, Ericsson, Nokia, and IMEC have developed graphene photonics integration for high-speed transmission systems. At MWC, they showcased a packaged graphene-based modulator operating over several optical telecommunications bands. I saw the first package transmitters with optical modulators based on graphene. The modulator is only one-tenth of a millimeter. The transfer capacity is 10 Gbps, but the aim is to bring that to 100 Gbps in a year’s time. The applications will be able to play a key role in the development of 5G technology. More information: www.cnit.it/en/.

Optical modulator based on graphene technology

Optical modulator based on graphene technology

THE ART OF HEATING

FGV Cambridge Nanosystems recently developed a novel “spray-on” graphene heating system that provides uniform, large-area heating. The material can be applied to paintings or walls and turned into a ‘heating’ area that can be wirelessly controlled via a mobile app. The same methodology can also double as a temperature sensor, where you can control light intensity by sensing body temperature. More information: www.cambridgenanosystems.com

Graphene-based heater

Graphene-based heater

FOAM SENSOR FOR SHOES

Atheletes can benefit from light, strong, sensor-based shoes that that can monitor their status. To make this happen, the University of Cambridge developed a 3-D printed shoe with embedded graphene foam sensors that can monitor the pressure applied. They combine complicated structural design with accurate sensing function. The graphene foam sensor can be used for measuring the number of steps and the weight of the person. More information: www.cam.ac.uk

Graphene pressure sensors embedded in shoes

Graphene pressure sensors embedded in shoes

FLEXIBLE WI-FI RECEIVER

More wireless fidelity can be expected when graphene-based receivers come into play. The receivers based on graphene are small and flexible and can be used for integration into clothes and other textile applications. AMO GmbH and RWTH Aachen University are developing the first flexible Wi-Fi receiver. The underlying graphene MMIC process enables the fabrication of the Wi-Fi receiver on both flexible and rigid substrates. This flexible Wi-Fi receiver is the first graphene-based front-end receiver for any type of modulated signal. The research shows that this technology can be used up to 90 GHz, which opens it up to new applications in IoT and mobile phones. More information: www.amo.de

Using graphene in flexible Wi-Fi receiver

Using graphene in flexible Wi-Fi receiver

5″ DISPLAY WITH UP TO 12K RESOLUTION

Santiago Cartamil-Bueno, a PhD student at TU Delft, was the first to observe a change in colors of small graphene “balloons.” These balloons appear when pressure is applied in a double layer of graphene. When this graphene is placed over silicon with small indents, the balloons can move in and out the silicon dents. If the graphene layer is closer to the silicon, they turn blue. If it is farther away from the silicon, they will turn red. Santiago observed this effect first and is researching the possibilities to turn this effect into high-resolution display. It uses the light from the environment and turns it into a very low-power consumption process. The resolution is very high; a typical 5″ display would be able to show images with 8K to 12K resolution. More information:
www.delta.tudelft.nl/artikel/ballooning-graphene-may-be-used-as-pixel/32619

Single-Chip, Multi-Protocol Switch for Intelligent Apps

Analog Devices recently introduced a real-time Ethernet, multi-protocol (REM) switch chip Ethernet connectivity solution for intelligent factory applications. Well suited for a variety of connected motion applications, you can use the “TSN-ready” (time sensitive networking) fido5000 with any processor, any protocol, and any stack.

The fido5000 two-port embedded Ethernet switch’s features, specs, and benefits include:

  • Reduces board size and power consumption while improving Ethernet performance at the node under any network load condition.
  • Attaches to Analog’s ADSP-SC58x, ADSP-2158x, and ADSP-CM40x motion control processors
  • Supports PROFINET RT/IRT, EtherNet/IP with beacon-based DLR, ModbusTCP, EtherCAT, SERCOS, and POWERLINK.
  • Achieves cycle times below 125 µs
  • Includes drivers for simple integration with any Industrial Ethernet protocol stack

The fido5100 is scheduled for full production in September 2017 and will cost $6 each in 1,000-piece quantities. The fido5200 (EtherCAT Capable) is also scheduled for full production in September 2017 and will cost $8 each in 1,000-piece quantities.

Analog Devices | www.analog.com

Expansion Connector Sample Kits Target Makers

Samtec has announced the release of four unique Expansion Connector Sample Kits for Makers. These new kits allow continued growth and stacking of the most popular electronics platforms using standard 0.100″ (2.54mm) centerline IDC cables, sockets and headers. Rapid prototyping of innovative projects using open-source electronic platforms typically requires basic connectors and cable assemblies.

Samtec RasberryPi3Kit

Samtec has developed Expansion Connector Sample Kits for four of the most popular platforms:

  • Arduino Uno R3 Expansion Connector Sample Kit
  • BeagleBone Black Expansion Connector Sample Kit
  • ARM mbed Application Board Expansion Connector Sample Kit
  • Raspberry Pi 3 Expansion Connector Sample Kit

Samtec | www.samtec.com

Small Antenna Covers Bands for LPWAN, IoT and Smart Cities

Antenova has announce a new antenna, Grandis, part number SR42I010. It is an SMD antenna that is physically smaller yet provides enhanced performance in the 863-870 MHz and 902-928MHz bands. It directly targets the growing number of M2M and IoT applications using the LPWAN protocols. With Grandis, Antenova has reduced the footprint of the LPWAN antenna to 12.0 x 11.0 x 1.6mm, while also enhancing the antenna’s performance. Grandis is a low-profile antenna which uses a ground plane to radiate, and is designed to be placed in the corner of the PCB.

Antenova Grandis SR42I010

Antenova endeavours to give PCB designers the benefit of flexibility in the positioning of the antenna within a design, so the Grandis antenna is supplied is two versions, Left and Right, to give designers a choice of locations for the antenna on a PCB. LPWAN is an increasingly popular choice for IoT and smart city applications because it uses less power, which means that the batteries within individual devices will have an extended life. Antenova’s Grandis antenna covers the newer LPWAN standards for connected devices in IoT and smart cities: LoRa, SigFox and Weightless-P. Grandis is suitable for all applications in the 863-870 MHz and 902-928MHz bands, so it could be used in industrial, scientific and medical applications, smart metering, network devices, manufacturing automation, agricultural and environmental monitoring and consumer tracking, worldwide.

 Antenova | www.antenova-m2m.com

FCC-Certified AMB2621 Bluetooth Smart Module

AMBER Wireless’s AMB2621 Bluetooth Smart module is certified for the United States and Canadian markets (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47, Telecommunication Part 15 – Radio Frequency Devices). Manufacturers that use the wireless module in their products can gain time and cost benefits as a result because they don’t have to have them specifically certified with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Amber Wireless

The certifications for the AMB2621 module demonstrate the following: personal safety isn’t at risk, there’s good immunity against electromagnetic interference, and the radio spectrum is used efficiently. As a result, manufacturers can bring their devices to market quicker and without their own FCC certification. A simple reference on the device label is sufficient (i.e., FCC-ID R7TAMB2621 is integrated).

The AMB2621’s features, specs, and benefits:

  • 2.4 GHz BLE radio module
  • 11 × 8 × 1.8 mm size
  • Compliant with the Bluetooth Smart 4.2 Standard
  • Offered with or without an integrated antenna
  • Expands existing products with a BLE interface without having to be adapted in advance..

AMBER Wireless | www.amber-wireless.de

Simplified Interfacing to High-Speed Infotainment In-Vehicle Networks

Microchip Technology recently announced a new high-speed network solution for in-vehicle infotainment with device control over Internet Protocol (IP). Unified Centralized Software Stack (UNICENS) is a free software module for anyone using Intelligent Network Interface Controllers (INIC), such as the OS81118, OS81119, and any future INICs. It enables you to focus on application development rather than network management.

Microchip UNICENS
With UNICENS, you can choose your preferred device control method including Media Oriented Systems Transport (MOST) technology’s FBlock, Ethernet IP and customer-specific methods. It also supports the configuration and control of all network participants from one central node. Furthermore, you don’t need microcontrollers in all the other nodes in the network. UNICENS is currently available as open-source software for Microchip customers.

Microchip Technology | www.microchip.com

Creativity Lives Here

An Interview with Jean Noel Lefebvre

With the proliferation of affordable ‘Net-connected technologies during the last decade, the nontechnical members of society have come to realize that electrical engineering is an exceedingly creative endeavor. Outside-the-box innovators like Jean Noel Lefebvre are literally reinventing how we interact with the world around us.

By Wisse Hettinga

Lefebvre-P1

Jean Noel Lefebvre is an electronics engineer with a strong interest in how people interact with the electronic systems. A true outside-the-box thinker, started his company, Ootsidebox (www.ootsidebox.fr), right in the middle of the YouFactory fab lab in Lyon, France. He knows where creativity lives and is willing to show it to you. Meet Jean Noel Lefebvre.

HETTINGA: Why do you have your office in the middle of the fab lab?

LEFEBVRE: The fab lab here is a wonderful place where people can come to do some 3-D printing, laser cutting, or to work with electronics. But perhaps more importantly, it is a place where you can meet other people, where you can learn new skills and find new ideas and inspiration.

HETTINGA: That is important for you—the interaction between technology and others?

LEFEBVRE: Yes, that has always been part of my projects. My first invention was the Ootside box. It was a touch application and it allowed you to control a computer or a system just by pointing or with gestures. We tried raising enough funds on Indigogo to continue developing it, but unfortunately, we did not reach our targets. After that, I decided to name my company after this project. Through this project, I also discovered the Arduino ecosystem and the enormously inspiring world of makers and fab labs. I always was interested in electronics, but when you are very young, you have no idea what you are doing and all my radios and sound equipment failed. That is what I learn here—how to help people, sometimes young people, understand how electronics works.

Lefebvre-P2

HETTINGA: And what do they need to learn?

LEFEBVRE: Good soldering! If you learn good soldering, you are already halfway to a successful project. I sometimes do soldering classes in schools. I bring some easy soldering projects and some equipment, and it is very rewarding to see how the kids are able to make their first electronic project.

HETTINGA: You are a big fan of Arduino.

LEFEBVRE: Indeed. The Arduino platform and ecosystem is important because of its low threshold to the world of electronics. Arduino is even so important and valuable that I decided to make a real gold version, the Golduino. I have it here, and it is still work in progress, but for people who want to have something special and valuable, it will be a great thing to have or to give to others.

Lefebvre-P3

HETTINGA: Again, I see you have a special take on electronics. And again, this refers to a special interaction between people and electronics.

LEFEBVRE: I feel that is very important. The world of technology can make people alone and isolated with very little room for emotions. Take the IoT developments as an example. You can see it as a world of sensors, actuators, and huge amounts of data. You can easily get lost. To find a response to that, I am doing a special project called “Color the World.” It will be a Wi-Fi-connected lamp that will take the color of everything you hold in front of it. In the back, there will be a world map where you can “share” you color with others and color the world. On Earth Day you can all decide to color the world green, make your part of the world yellow if the sun shines, or blue if the world is “blue.”

HETTINGA: And you found a way to keep playing your old EP records?

LEFEBVRE: Ha, yes. If you are like me, you will still have your old EP vinyl records, but no easy way to play them anymore. With my Floating Disc Player, you will be able to use the cover of the EP to play your favorite music again. Inside the EP cover, there is an RFID tag, and the moment you insert the EP in the player, it will recognize the song in the playlist and start the music. It is a great player for home parties!

Lefebvre-P4

HETTINGA: What more are you working on?

LEFEBVRE: Again, it is interaction, I am afraid. I am making an interface for the Airbar. The Airbar is an infrared sensor bar that originally was developed to turn your laptop screen into a touch screen. With my interface, it will be possible to turn everything like desks, whiteboards, displays, and windows into interactive areas. You can draw a piano keyboard on a piece of paper, launch the application, and you can start playing by just touching the paper. The resolution is good enough to recognize your writing on plain paper, turn that into a digital pattern, and display that in an application.
HETTINGA: This will all be available for others?

LEFEBVRE: Yes, it will be available on my website www.ootsidebox.fr. It will be all open source, so everyone who is interested can continue developing the product.

HETTINGA: You know where creativity lives?

LEFEBVRE: Yes, that’s easy. It lives where open-minded people come together and want to share their ideas with others. That is why fab labs, tech shops, and makerspaces are important—open places where people can walk in, have a coffee and a chat, and go away with new ideas.

TeraFire Hard Cryptographic Microprocessor

Microsemi Corp. recently added Athena’s TeraFire cryptographic microprocessor to its new PolarFire field programmable gate array (FPGA) “S class” family. The TeraFire hard core provides Microsemi customers access to advanced security capabilities with high performance and low power consumption.

Microsemi
Features, benefits, and specs:

  • Supports additional algorithms and key sizes commonly used in commercial
  • Internet communications protocols such as TLS, IPSec, MACSec and KeySec.
  • The Athena TeraFire EXP-5200B DPA-resistant cryptographic microprocessor capable of nearly 200 MHz operation.
  • Enables high-speed DPA-resistant cryptographic protocols at speeds well over 100 Mbps
  • Integrated true random number generator for generating keys on-chip and for protecting cryptographic protocols
  • The TeraFire crypto microprocessor is extensible with additional object code licensed from Athena or with accelerators attached via the PolarFire FPGA fabric

Microsemi’s PolarFire “S class” FPGAs with Athena’s TeraFire cryptographic microprocessor will be available in Q2 2017. A soft version of the core is available for Microsemi’s SmartFusion2 SoC FPGAs.

Microsemi | www.microsemi.com

Radar Module for Makers

OmniPreSense Corp.’s recently unveiled radar module is capable of detecting objects 5 to 10 m away and giving electronic systems enhanced information about the world around them. Intended for the “maker” community, the $169 OPS241-A module is capable of making any Android phone supporting USB On-the-Go (OTG) into a radar gun.

OmniPreSense
The 53 mm × 59 mm OSP241-A short-range radar is capable of reporting motion, speed, and direction of objects detected in its wide field of view. You can plug it into a Raspberry Pi’s USB port to enable a variety of useful applications. An API provides direct control of the OPS241-A and allows for changes to reported units (e.g., meters/second and miles/hour), transmitted power, and other settings. Compared to PIR or ultrasonic sensors, the OPS241-A provides increased range, a wider coverage area, and immunity to noise and light, while providing enhanced information about the detected object.
Potential applications range from security motion detection to a radar gun. You can plug the OPS241-A directly into an Android phone or tablet running USB OTG and terminal program to turn them into a radar gun. When mounted on a drone, the OPS241-A can detect objects 5 to 10 m away for collision avoidance.

OmniPreSense Corp. | omnipresense.com